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Garden State (Or: Seven the Hard Way)

walker3.jpg

Weird happenings involving Cubs second baseman Todd Walker during Friday’s Cubs/Cardinals game. He was wearing his usual No. 7 when he doubled in the bottom of the 4th, and he was also wearing No. 7 during the top of the 5th (that’s him in the lower-right corner of this shot — it’s tough to see, but trust me, that’s a 7 on his back). But he apparently changed his jersey during the bottom of the 5th, because he took the field at the start of the 6th inning wearing No. 13. When this was brought to his attention, the game was delayed while he went back into the clubhouse to switch jerseys. All of which led to some interesting chatter between Cardinals announcers Al Hrabosky and Dan McLaughlin:

Hrabosky: There’s a little delay, as Todd Walker — I’m not sure what happened, but they said something about Todd Walker wearing number 13. That’s [Neifi] Perez’s number. I don’t know if he accidentally put on the wrong uniform, but I saw him motioning, something about his jersey, came in, and took it off. [Walker emerges from the dugout and trots out onto the field.] Now he’s got number 7 on. That’s his number, number 7. Sometimes, y’know, your locker — I mean, your jersey maybe gets misplaced, and you change it midway through the game, and you put on the wrong one. I guess if you’re wearing lucky 7, 13 wouldn’t be very lucky.

McLaughlin [adopting patronizing mock-serious tone]: Now what would happen? Would that be a violation? Ejection?

Hrabosky: Well, I heard the announcement here in the press box, they said Walker was wearing number 13. You know, they took the numbers off — er, the names off. So if you weren’t paying attention and just saw the big “C” [Cubs logo] on the front…

McLaughlin [somewhat derisively]: I wouldn’t have known. I bet 40,000 others wouldn’t have realized it either.

Hrabosky: No. It happens a lot of times during batting practice. Guys’ll accidentally put on the wrong number and nobody tells ’em. That happened to Chris Duncan the other day — he had on [Braden] Looper’s number. They were lockerin’ next to each other.

McLaughlin: I remember when we went to Philadelphia a couple of years ago, and on purpose the Cardinals wore J.D. Drew jerseys. It was J.D.’s first visit to Philly after rejecting their efforts to sign him, and of course he wound up in St. Louis.

Hrabosky: I saw a similar thing for Dick Allen’s first return to Connie Mack Stadium. During a rain delay, Leron Lee — Derrek Lee’s uncle — put on Dick Allen’s jersey, and a helmet and some glasses [Allen’s standard look, even when he wasn’t batting], and stood out there just to receive all the boos.

McLaughlin’s snide tone notwithstanding, this uni commentary could’ve been a lot worse. The same can’t be said, alas, for what was going on in the Cubs’ radio booth, where Walker’s jersey snafu led to an utterly surreal exchange between play-by-play man Pat Hughes and the perpetually befuddled Ron Santo:

Santo: So — oh, uh… Here’s what’s happened — oh, I see. They’re giving him a break, because — Walker wore the number 3, 13, jersey, and then had to come back out, change his jersey. Maybe give, uh, [Cubs pitcher Carlos] Marmol a little rest or something? I don’t know. I have no idea. He just came and, uh…

Hughes: Changed.

Santo: He’s changed. But I think, uh, the rules are you can’t change jerseys in the middle of a game. I just made that up.

Hughes: Made sense to me, Ron. I bought every bit of it. You, of course, wore number 10 your entire Cubs career.

Santo: Yup.

Hughes: Because at that time, when Ron was a young man, a lot of the women said, “Ronnie, you are a 10!” And he said to himself, “You know, that’s a pretty good number for me.”

Santo [giggling]: Well, I wore 29 in high school.

Hughes: Wow, you must have been good-looking!

Santo [laughing his head off]: I wore 29 as a quarterback, and 34 as a ballplayer. Can you imagine that?

Hughes: Now you’re 10. You’re just 10 to me, Ron.

Santo [regaining some semblance of composure]: Thanks, Patrick. And you have gone beyond, uh, my wildest dreams as far as being average. You are now above average.

Hughes: I’m above average?

Santo: You are above average. You look great today. The women out there in the stands are going, “Ooo-la-la!”

Hughes: First time I’ve ever heard that.

I know we’re all supposed to feel sorry for Santo, what with the diabetes and the amputations (insert pants/stirrups joke here), along with the Hall of Fame snub. But seriously, is there a bigger embarrassment on the airwaves than this guy? Has there ever been? Can’t even imagine what it must be like to have to listen to this hokum on a daily basis.

(Vertically arched thanks to Alex Seiver, who provided the two shots of Walker wearing No. 13.)

Pedro Update: As several readers have noted, sightings of Pedro Martinez wearing hiked-up pants began almost immediately after I sent him this check and this letter. That trend continued on Friday night, when Pedro made his first start in a month and, sure enough, was showing plenty of sock. No sign yet of the canceled check, however. Stay tuned.

Uni Watch News Ticker: Fans of Japanese baseball will definitely want to check out this link, which features video clips from the 1980s (with thanks to Jeremy Whiting) … According to this article (forwarded by Scott Tande), Johan Santana “draws smiley faces and balloons under the bill of his cap.” … In a related item, a trusted source with a National League team checks in with the following very disturbing news: “During spring training I hard from a New Era rep that everyone was going to black underbills for gamers next season, and BP caps and jerseys were changing. The new cap next year might be called ‘slick fit’ — not sure about that, I heard it from the gift shop when I asked why their stock was so low.” If this turns out to be true, it could spell the end of the underbrim inscription as we know it. … As reported here last week, Juan Pierre’s been told to stop wearing his blue camouflage undershirt — and now appears to be going out of his way to demonstrate his compliance. … There’s a new member of the non-switch-hitting double-earflap club: Sin-Soo Choo, who had a cup of coffee earlier this season with the Mariners and is now playing in Cleveland. … The Lowell Spinners — a Red Sox minor league affiliate — honored Bosox third baseman Mike Lowell last Friday by renaming themselves the Mike Lowell Spinners for a day — just in time, coincidentally, for Keith Foulke’s rehab stint. … UCLA is changing the blue stripes and numerals on its road jersey from navy to powder blue, to match the school’s home jersey. Fans are already complaining about black outlining on the numerals, especially since there’s no corresponding outlining on the shoulder stripes. … Great video here about how Edgerrin James got the Cardinals to switch to black shoes. … Good observation by longtime Uni Watch contributor Ross Yoshida, who writes: “Check out this pic of David Cone. It appears that he’s wearing traditional stirrups OVER a 2-in-1 sewn-in faux stirrup sock! Talk about overkill.” … The 49ers are unretiring John Brodie’s No. 12 for Trent Dilfer — an odd move, since Dilfer isn’t even at top of the team’s QB depth chart.

 

114 comments to Garden State (Or: Seven the Hard Way)

  • Matt | July 31, 2006 at 9:33 am |

    Boo! Ripping on Santo is the oldest and easiest journalism trick in the book. Shame on you, Uniwatch. I thought you were above such nonsense! Stick to the unis and leave the broadcast criticism to the players! And no, we’re not supposed to feel sorry for Ronny. shesh. *head shake*

  • whiteshark17 | July 31, 2006 at 9:37 am |

    I am normally opposed to powder blue (or baby blue or sky blue or whatever it is going to get called next week) because there is nothing tough about it. It’s a color you put up in a babys room. However, UCLA has had it forever and it is classic, so I applaud this move.

  • Brooks Reuter | July 31, 2006 at 9:42 am |

    Here is an interesting note for UniWatch, it is my first ever controbution with the prospect of getting my name mentioned. Dontrelle Willis, former teamate of Juan Pierre, is also wearing a camo shirt under his jersey. I noticed Dontrelle displaying this in the first game of the Phillies Marlins double header yesterday.

  • casey shaeffer | July 31, 2006 at 9:55 am |

    I happened to catch a glimpse of the national pro fastpitch leacgue while flipping channels this weekend. In the game I was watching, both teams were sporting this monochrome pant/sock look….

    Look at those socks

  • The Dude | July 31, 2006 at 9:59 am |

    Yesterday during the Pirates – Giants game in the Burgh. In the 10th inning, Ronny Paulino had to switch from his grey away facemask to his black home facemask because of a malfunction to his straps. After switching to the black mask, the Pirates announcers discussed how Ronny’s mask does not match his chest protector and shin pads.
    I dont think there was a problem with the straps, I just think Ronny made a mistake and put his grey which is his away mask on accidentally.
    He faked a malfunction, so he could run over to the dugout and switch masks.
    Examples of mask colors:

    http://sports.yahoo....

    http://sports.yahoo....

  • Jim | July 31, 2006 at 10:06 am |

    Is that really black on the outlines of the UCLA numbers? I thought it was navy blue, since the helmet logo is navy blue. I know there are some versions of the UCLA logo that contain black, and some of the other sports wear black, but I’ve only seen navy blue used for the football team.

  • The Dude | July 31, 2006 at 10:53 am |

    Thing I noticed that only Uni Watch readers would notice. I was watching “The Rookie” (what a great movie) and I saw that there was a mistake in the movie. The mistake was that character named Brooks who was Jimmy Morris’ teammate with the Durham Bulls stole a base in one of the scenes wearing a black helmet, which is not a team color. That is not the kicker, the kicker is that Brooks was wearing a one ear flapped helmet. And we all know minor league baseball players all wear double ear flap helmets.

    Baby blue in the UCLA jersey, awesome, I have to hope that the number outline is not black but navy blue.

    Even though I hate the reference, I heard the reason Willis and Juan wear the camo is because they feel that they have to go to war to win a baseball game. (enter Kellen Winslow joke here)

  • Lee | July 31, 2006 at 10:56 am |

    As far as Trent Dilfer using John Brodie’s number 12 this year, it’s because there is some sort of pre-existing relationship between the two. It’s not as if Brodie let just ANYONE use his number (although if Trent Dilfer doesn’t qualify as a “just anyone”…), but because they were buddies already, Brodie made the exception.

    Lee

  • Lincoln | July 31, 2006 at 11:10 am |

    I am a lifelong Cub fan. I love Ron Santo for what he stands for and what he has accomplished in his life despite many obstacles. But, come on, he is probably the worst announcer out there. More than half the time, as indicated in today’s blog, he sounds like they woke him up from the nursing home and took him to the game. I assume they return him to the nursing home after every game. As for having to listen to him, it is part of being a Cub fan, part of the misery that is being a Cub fan and always having to wait for next year. Pat Hughes, however, is a great broadcaster and makes up, to a certain extent, for Santo’s lack of ability in the booth. I think Santo’s favorite saying the booth is: “Ahhh, geeeez!!!”, whenever the Cubs make a mistake.
    Despite Santo, the Cubs radio team is not even the worst in the city. Try listening to Hawk and DJ on Sox TV or Ed Farmer and Chris Singleton on Sox radio. They are bad.

  • JTH | July 31, 2006 at 11:12 am |

    [quote comment=”3683″]Boo! Ripping on Santo is the oldest and easiest journalism trick in the book. Shame on you, Uniwatch. I thought you were above such nonsense! Stick to the unis and leave the broadcast criticism to the players! And no, we’re not supposed to feel sorry for Ronny. shesh. *head shake*[/quote]
    I love Ron Santo, but Paul’s absolutely right — his broadcasting skills are atrocious. Cubs’ radio broadcasts are virtually unlistenable unless Dave Otto’s filling in for Santo.

  • JTH | July 31, 2006 at 11:19 am |

    [quote comment=”3692″]Despite Santo, the Cubs radio team is not even the worst in the city. Try listening to Hawk and DJ on Sox TV or Ed Farmer and Chris Singleton on Sox radio. They are bad.[/quote]
    You’re talking shades of gray here. All four teams suck and both organizations should be embarassed that in the nation’s third largest market, they’re subjecting the fans to this crap on a daily basis.

    The margin between best and worst is extremely slim, but for the record, I’d rate Hughes/Santo as the worst and Farmer/Singleton as the best, with Kasper/Brenly and Harrelson/Jackson duking it out for second place.

  • Micah | July 31, 2006 at 11:31 am |

    Oh no, more Cub-bashing, as if a 4-game sweep against the Cards isn’t good enough!! Ok, nevermind, I realize how frustrated Cubs fans are because I’m one too and the Chicago-area commentators aren’t that good, that is for sure. But hey, someone forgot to mention Atlanta, Tampa Bay, and Florida commentators suck just as bad, ‘specially the Braves. They just make me want to go to sleep!

  • J-Rob | July 31, 2006 at 11:45 am |

    Not only are Braves/Cubs announcers bad, but so are the camera shots. So many cuts to the fans, then back to the player. Seems like any chance they get, gotta show the crowd.

    Sad to see Ronnie Belliard and his crooked hat leave.

    crooked hat

  • Mr. Met | July 31, 2006 at 12:03 pm |

    [quote comment=”3690″]As far as Trent Dilfer using John Brodie’s number 12 this year, it’s because there is some sort of pre-existing relationship between the two. It’s not as if Brodie let just ANYONE use his number (although if Trent Dilfer doesn’t qualify as a “just anyone”…), but because they were buddies already, Brodie made the exception.

    Lee[/quote]
    I think the more disturbing trend is that NFL teams are allowing numbers to become “un-retired”. First it was the Seahawks with Steve Largent’s #80. Now granted, it was being used by Jerry Rice, bu we’re not talking the Jerry Rice of the Monatana-Young era, we’re talking about a Jerry Rice who was washed-up and didn’t want to face the obvious. Now a nobody like Trent Dilfer (and before anyone chimes in with “but he’s a Super Bowl winner”, I think if you mentioned that to Ray Lewis and the Raven defense from 2000 they would set you straight on who won that title that season) can have a jersey un-retired because he’s friends with the player. The NFL needs to step in and put a stop to this. Once retired, always retired, no matter what.

  • nybatt | July 31, 2006 at 12:04 pm |

    wanted to chime in with a seldom-discussed uni detail… buy hey, that’s what we’re all about here!!!

    studying photos/video from “my” football giants training camp I noticed a small alteration in their helmets this year… the front, mid-portion, above the fore-head area of the helmet that usually features the word “RIDDELL” has changed.. (by the way, is there an official name for this “tab” area??!!??)

    the giants (since 2000) were one of the only teams that predominantly left the tab blank… I always thought it was a tip of the cap to the throwback helmet/uni theme.. and a time when there was no “RIDDELL”, “BIKE”, or any other manufacturer name… for the record, a small number of giant helmets did have the RIDDELL, but only a handful…

    anyhow.. this season the giants, on the blank-tabbed helmets, have added a small “ny” logo in blue… while I think it looks phenomenal.. I kinda liked the uniqueness of the blank look… most players are sporting the new addition.. while some retain the RIDDELL….

  • Pete_The_Retailer | July 31, 2006 at 12:04 pm |

    In that video of the Japanese game, did anybody notice that the Buffaloes’ catcher’s helmet is a brimless model, but it’s painted to look like a backwards batting helmet (panels and simulated brim and all)?

  • Chris In CA | July 31, 2006 at 12:11 pm |

    [quote comment=”3683″]Boo! Ripping on Santo is the oldest and easiest journalism trick in the book. Shame on you, Uniwatch. I thought you were above such nonsense! Stick to the unis and leave the broadcast criticism to the players! And no, we’re not supposed to feel sorry for Ronny. shesh. *head shake*[/quote]

    I’ve heard Santo a few times and it’s time for him to hang em up…the guy is brutal. We have a similar situation here in San Diego. Long time Padres announcer Jerry Coleman is getting senile and just doesn’t have it anymore. Too bad Ted Leitner (aka Ron Burgundy) is waiting in the wings. But I have to say our TV guys, Matt Vasgersian, Mark Grant, and Tony Gwynn are the best. Sounds like you guys in Chicago have it rough.

  • JTH | July 31, 2006 at 12:21 pm |

    [quote comment=”3698″]The NFL needs to step in and put a stop to this. Once retired, always retired, no matter what.[/quote]
    But number retirements are team decisions. The league has no real say in the matter. The only time I’ve ever heard of the league getting involved in a number retirement situation is a few years ago when they asked the Bears to STOP retiring numbers.

    If the NFL had its way, they’d probably prefer that teams not retire numbers at all because of the strict position-specific numbering policy.

  • john | July 31, 2006 at 12:23 pm |

    UCLA use to have great uniforms before they started “modernizing” them. They need to revert to the “swirly” numbers they had until about 9 or 10 years ago. And, outlines are always a bad idea.

  • Kyle | July 31, 2006 at 12:25 pm |

    Class move from UCLA for putting the baby blue on the uniform. Classic stuff there. Unfortunately, that black number outline makes them look like the Jacksonville Jaguars. Hopefully that will change.

    On a side note: with the big MLB trade deadline coming up (or gone already, if you’re reading this after 4 ET), what would you folks say is the WORST uni-related trade ever in any sport? For instance, if someone went from a beautiful classic jersey (Yankees, for instance) to a terrible abomination of aesthetics (say, original Devil Rays uni).

  • Jaret | July 31, 2006 at 12:39 pm |

    I listen to Pat and Ron on a regular basis and listening to Ron is a lot like how you had to listen to Harry Carey. It is about their pure love of the Cubs. Santo lives and dies on every pitch. Over the last couple months when the Cubs have been playing poorly, Santo has been truly miserable in the box. He relates to Cubs fans better than anybody and that’s why we love him.

  • Mark in Shiga | July 31, 2006 at 12:49 pm |

    [quote comment=”3705″]what would you folks say is the WORST uni-related trade ever in any sport? For instance, if someone went from a beautiful classic jersey (Yankees, for instance) to a terrible abomination of aesthetics (say, original Devil Rays uni).[/quote]

    If the Maddux-to-San-Diego rumors are true, there’ll be a candidate today!

    Looking at Todd Walker in the #13 Neifi jersey reminds me of a logo-creep problem that’s been bothering me for a while now. Ever since MLB started putting its logo on the back collars of the jerseys, the names and numbers on the backs seem to have been moving downward a few inches, to the point where there’s more white space above the numbers than there is below it.

    It looks fine if the player is a huge guy like Derrek Lee, but for most of the guys it looks terrible.

    Does anyone know if the guidelines on positioning the numbers changed from “X inches below the collar” to “X inches below the bottom of the MLB logo”?

    The Neifi jersey is bad enough; check out Mike Lieberthal, the red Astros jerseys, and this WBC entry from Cuba.

    Dump the collar logo and move the guy’s number up two inches!

  • Beau | July 31, 2006 at 1:18 pm |

    [quote comment=”3701″][quote comment=”3683″]Boo! Ripping on Santo is the oldest and easiest journalism trick in the book. Shame on you, Uniwatch. I thought you were above such nonsense! Stick to the unis and leave the broadcast criticism to the players! And no, we’re not supposed to feel sorry for Ronny. shesh. *head shake*[/quote]

    I’ve heard Santo a few times and it’s time for him to hang em up…the guy is brutal. We have a similar situation here in San Diego. Long time Padres announcer Jerry Coleman is getting senile and just doesn’t have it anymore. Too bad Ted Leitner (aka Ron Burgundy) is waiting in the wings. But I have to say our TV guys, Matt Vasgersian, Mark Grant, and Tony Gwynn are the best. Sounds like you guys in Chicago have it rough.[/quote]

    B’ah! This is one Brewer fan still upset you guys stole Vasgersian from us. That guy is great!

    And Paul… no mention of the Brewers wearing Cerveceros jerseys this past Saturday? This was the first time they’ve ever done such a thing!

  • JTH | July 31, 2006 at 1:19 pm |

    [quote comment=”3706″]I listen to Pat and Ron on a regular basis and listening to Ron is a lot like how you had to listen to Harry Carey.[/quote]
    Maybe so, but Harry Caray had a Hall of Fame career. He was a terrific broadcaster in his prime. By the time he got the Cubs gig, his best days were well behind him, but on his good days he still could function as an above average play-by-play man. The same can not be said of Ron Santo as an analyst.

    If the Cubs went to a 3-man booth with a qualified color man, I’d happily listen to Ronnie spin his yarns.

  • Jeff | July 31, 2006 at 1:37 pm |

    The restaurant I was at had the softball on and the first thing I noticed about the uniforms was the half-moon stripes under the armpits that looked like colored sweat stains. Not sure if its all the teams, but the two that were on (Akron and Philly) both had them.

  • Brett | July 31, 2006 at 1:52 pm |

    [quote comment=”3699″]wanted to chime in with a seldom-discussed uni detail… buy hey, that’s what we’re all about here!!!

    studying photos/video from “my” football giants training camp I noticed a small alteration in their helmets this year… the front, mid-portion, above the fore-head area of the helmet that usually features the word “RIDDELL” has changed.. (by the way, is there an official name for this “tab” area??!!??)

    the giants (since 2000) were one of the only teams that predominantly left the tab blank… I always thought it was a tip of the cap to the throwback helmet/uni theme.. and a time when there was no “RIDDELL”, “BIKE”, or any other manufacturer name… for the record, a small number of giant helmets did have the RIDDELL, but only a handful…

    anyhow.. this season the giants, on the blank-tabbed helmets, have added a small “ny” logo in blue… while I think it looks phenomenal.. I kinda liked the uniqueness of the blank look… most players are sporting the new addition.. while some retain the RIDDELL….[/quote]
    Riddell has the licensing rights to the NFL Helmets. So for that reason if a player chooses to wear another Helmet (Schutt or Adams) they must blockout the Brand with either a blank space or team name. Players wearing Riddell are strongly urged to keep the Riddell logo visible. The area in question is called a Nose Bumper.

  • Matthew | July 31, 2006 at 2:05 pm |

    [quote comment=”3689″]Thing I noticed that only Uni Watch readers would notice. I was watching “The Rookie” (what a great movie) and I saw that there was a mistake in the movie. The mistake was that character named Brooks who was Jimmy Morris’ teammate with the Durham Bulls stole a base in one of the scenes wearing a black helmet, which is not a team color. That is not the kicker, the kicker is that Brooks was wearing a one ear flapped helmet. And we all know minor league baseball players all wear double ear flap helmets.

    Baby blue in the UCLA jersey, awesome, I have to hope that the number outline is not black but navy blue.

    Even though I hate the reference, I heard the reason Willis and Juan wear the camo is because they feel that they have to go to war to win a baseball game. (enter Kellen Winslow joke here)[/quote]

    They probably gave minor league players single flag helmets in that movie (despite the rule requiring all minor league players to wear two flap helmets) so that you can better see the faces of the actors.

    In Bull Durham, Kevin Costner’s character Crash Davis is, I believe, the only batter in the movie who wears a single flag helmet (someone correct me on that if I’m wrong) because they had several close ups of him in the batters box and it is easier to see the star of the movie’s face in the single ear flap helmet.

    Bull Durham is, by the way, the best baseball movie ever. I put Field of Dreams in a close second.

  • Soda | July 31, 2006 at 2:17 pm |

    I can understand the Santo bashing. I found him unlistenable when I first moved here. However, they certainly grow on you. Pat Hughes is not only one of the most quick witted guys on the air, but he has an amazing ability to both put up with Santo and poke fun at him without being mean. Both the audience and Santo are in on the joke, but Santo doesn’t mind it. Many in Chicago tune in to Cubs games for the pure comedy gold, especially in lopsided games (a conversation about the Kenny Rogers song “The Gambler” during a Reds shelling of the Cubs in May comes to mind.)

    Hughes is a solid play-by-play man, but when teamed with Ron Santo they make for one of the most entertaining pairings in sports. Maybe not the most skilled, but certainly entertaining.

  • The Dude | July 31, 2006 at 2:25 pm |

    I agree with the ear flapp face shot cameo in the movies. You can also reference all three Mighty Ducks movies, when the players don’t have chin straps on their helmets/facemasks.

  • Greg | July 31, 2006 at 2:35 pm |

    As the MLB uni-trade deadline approaches, we need to salute the Cincinnati Reds. The Austin Kearns/Felipe Lopez for Royce Clayton/Gary Majewski/Bill Bray trade was pure uni-genious. Kearns and Lopez were wearers of pajama pants. Trading Kearns opened up a roster spot for Chris Denorfia from the minors allowing the Reds to have three players on the field, Denorfia, Clayton, and Bray, all sporting this look.

    Royce Clayton
    http://us.news2.yimg...

  • Paul | July 31, 2006 at 2:41 pm |

    [quote comment=”3689″]Thing I noticed that only Uni Watch readers would notice. I was watching “The Rookie” (what a great movie) and I saw that there was a mistake in the movie. The mistake was that character named Brooks who was Jimmy Morris’ teammate with the Durham Bulls stole a base in one of the scenes wearing a black helmet, which is not a team color. That is not the kicker, the kicker is that Brooks was wearing a one ear flapped helmet. And we all know minor league baseball players all wear double ear flap helmets.[/quote]

    If I am not mistaken, there were more errors in “The Rookie.” When Morris fist gets called up, he is shown wearing the Rays current uniform, instead of the old design Morris actually wore. However, the uniform in the school’s trophy case is the correct design.

    As far as I’m concerned this is an OK form of artistic license. Sacrificing accuracy was necessary to protect us from those uniforms; they were horrendous.

  • Mr. Met | July 31, 2006 at 2:46 pm |

    The New York Mets have a similar situation to the Santo-thing with Ralph Kiner, but handle it the way the Cubs SHOULD do it. Kiner, who it is safe to say has his best days WAY behind him, usually makes appearances on the Friday telecasts for a couple of innings, an does his usual schtick where he talks about the old-timers he faced, how things were back in the day, etc. His interaction with Gary Cohen, Keith Hernandez and Ron Darling is acutally a highlight of the telecasts, and I think SNY’s approach of “Ralph-in-moderation” works perfectly. Because as much respect as I have for all that Mr. Kiner has done, both in the field and on the mic, there’s NO WAY that having Kiner would work for 9 innings, day-in-and day-out.

  • Anthony Memme | July 31, 2006 at 2:49 pm |

    Seven the Hard Way > Garden State

  • Chris | July 31, 2006 at 2:56 pm |

    [quote]Once retired, always retired, no matter what.[/quote]
    Can we add the caveat that a retired player un-retiring can have their old number back? The travesty of MJ wearing 45 was awful. Can you imagine if Mario Lemieux wasn’t wearing 66? I don’t think I could stomache it.

  • Ian K | July 31, 2006 at 3:05 pm |

    [quote comment=”3705″]
    On a side note: with the big MLB trade deadline coming up (or gone already, if you’re reading this after 4 ET), what would you folks say is the WORST uni-related trade ever in any sport? For instance, if someone went from a beautiful classic jersey (Yankees, for instance) to a terrible abomination of aesthetics (say, original Devil Rays uni).[/quote]

    If you go to MLB.com front page, check out the photo for Sean Casey, traded today to the Tigers. The horrid dot matrix Nike undershirt is displayed prominently in the photo (2nd Flash slide after Utley). I like the Pirates classic “P” hats and the color scheme, but the yellow-on-black is the worst of the dot matrix sleeves I’ve seen. Casey lucked out by being traded to the Tigers – classy unis, ML-best record.

    On the subject of worst announcers, I submit Josh Lewin, play-by-play for the Rangers and Fox’s Joe Buck-in-training, as Lewin has been doing the Fox Saturday national afternoon broadcast. Ugh – as if the Texas heat isn’t bad enough, I get Lewin. Take me home to L.A. to the melodious voice of Sir Vin Scully.

  • EugeneCoug | July 31, 2006 at 3:10 pm |

    UCLA uses navy blue as an accent color, not black.

  • Mr. Met | July 31, 2006 at 3:16 pm |

    [quote comment=”3722″]Can we add the caveat that a retired player un-retiring can have their old number back? The travesty of MJ wearing 45 was awful. Can you imagine if Mario Lemieux wasn’t wearing 66? I don’t think I could stomache it.[/quote]

    That makes SO much sense. And I don’t have a problem with retirements of numbers or what have you; the only problem I have is when someone (like Jerry Rice) decides he’s bigger than the other team’s tradition and decides that he wants a number to be un-retired so he can use it. It put Steve Largent in a difficult situation; after all, if he says no, he looks petty. The way it went down actually worked out to his advantage, because I remember the scribes chastising Rice for his selfishness and attitude that he was bigger than the game (or tradition, be that as it may). And in the end Rice wound up doing nothing with Seattle anyway. I wouldn’t be surprised if, when he went to the Broncos, he walked up to Rod Smith and asked him to peel the number 80 off his jersey. I also happen to think it’s silly that John Brodie would ask the 49ers to un-retire his number. I mean, suppose that the Dolphins (and they will do so eventually) retire Marino’s #13. How dumb would it look for someone who’s a second or third-stringer and friends with Marinohas Marino ask the Fins to un-retire his number? That would be ridiculous. There are certain numbers that are recognizable with a player, and even if the NFL has nothing to do with number retiremenets and would prefer that the individual teams not retire numbers, there’s no way that anyone should be using numbers like 8, 22 or 88 in Dallas, 4 in Green Bay (once he retires), 56 in Big Blue, 13 in Miami, or even 12 in San Francisco. Even a fan who is not familiar with other teams’ players probably would recognize all those numbers as belonging to Aikman, Smith, Irvin, Favre, Taylor, Marino and Brodie. The other thing I don’t get is, hasn’t Dilfer always been #8 in the pros? Why the switch to #12 suddenly?

    But you’re right, Jordan in 45 or Lemieux in anything other than 66 was, and would be, would be a travesty.

  • Matthew | July 31, 2006 at 4:04 pm |

    Are you suggesting he take Steve Young’s number? Granted it’s not retired (yet), but it will be someday and just like the other numbers you mentioned, there’s no reason that anyone else in a 49ers uniform should wear that number because it is so associated with a particular player.

    That being said, I agree with you 100% on everything else.

  • Chris In CA | July 31, 2006 at 4:18 pm |

    Can we call this the Uni Watch hex? All this Todd Walker talk and now he’s a member of the Padres!

    Great move Kevin Towers (note sarcasm). This is the huge transaction that will for sure put us over the top!

  • Brooks Reuter | July 31, 2006 at 4:23 pm |

    Dilfer actually wore 12 in college, and with the Bucs both old and new. He also wore number 4 with the Seahawks.

  • Brooks Reuter | July 31, 2006 at 4:27 pm |

    It also appears a Baltimore fan had a little fun at the expense of Mr. Dilfer.

  • Mr. Met | July 31, 2006 at 4:34 pm |

    [quote comment=”3728″]Are you suggesting he take Steve Young’s number? Granted it’s not retired (yet), but it will be someday and just like the other numbers you mentioned, there’s no reason that anyone else in a 49ers uniform should wear that number because it is so associated with a particular player.

    That being said, I agree with you 100% on everything else.[/quote]
    Absolutely not! I totally agree with you that a number tha thas been associated with a great player (like #8 in San Francisco) should not just be handed out willy-nilly to any scrub that requests it. My whole point was (and I believe you picked up on it) that retired numbers should stay retired. But in the scenario you mentioned above, I don’t think the 49ers would let Dilfer use #8 anyway.

  • Matthew | July 31, 2006 at 4:45 pm |

    [quote comment=”3735″][quote comment=”3728″]Are you suggesting he take Steve Young’s number? Granted it’s not retired (yet), but it will be someday and just like the other numbers you mentioned, there’s no reason that anyone else in a 49ers uniform should wear that number because it is so associated with a particular player.

    That being said, I agree with you 100% on everything else.[/quote]
    Absolutely not! I totally agree with you that a number tha thas been associated with a great player (like #8 in San Francisco) should not just be handed out willy-nilly to any scrub that requests it. My whole point was (and I believe you picked up on it) that retired numbers should stay retired. But in the scenario you mentioned above, I don’t think the 49ers would let Dilfer use #8 anyway.[/quote]

    Wasn’t quite sure if you had thought about Steve Young, so I just wanted to throw that out there. We are in complete agreement.

    I would hope that the 49ers wouldn’t let anyone (especially someone like Dilfer) use Steve Young’s number, but then again they are letting him use Brodie’s #12 (albeit with Brodie’s ‘consent’…sounds fishy to me).

    Once a number is retired, it’s done with. Unless the original player comes back to the game (i.e. pulls an MJ), then no one else has any business wearing that player’s number on his respective team. Otherwise, why retire numbers at all?

  • matt1977 | July 31, 2006 at 4:49 pm |

    Trent Dilfer can wear whatever number he wants…He’ll still be Trent Dilfer.

  • Matthew | July 31, 2006 at 4:52 pm |

    [quote comment=”3737″]Trent Dilfer can wear whatever number he wants…He’ll still be Trent Dilfer.[/quote]

    Touché.

  • chris | July 31, 2006 at 5:36 pm |

    [quote comment=”3738″][quote comment=”3737″]Trent Dilfer can wear whatever number he wants…He’ll still be Trent Dilfer.[/quote]

    Touché.[/quote]

    ” I dont believe you used that correctly, you haven’t made a point yet.”
    Sincerly,
    The Apple Guy

  • Matthew | July 31, 2006 at 5:39 pm |

    Dear Apple Guy,

    Read all of the above back forth comments on Trent Dilfer (and his utter uselessness as an NFL QB), many points were made.

    Paul, have you addressed retired numbers in the past? An article has practically been outlined for you in the comments today.

  • Zach | July 31, 2006 at 5:52 pm |

    check this out… the Ichiro jersey sold in the ESPN.com “ESPN Shop” has a serious issue… the picture shows a white home jersey, but the name and number font is from the dark alternates. i don’t know if that’s how it ships or if it’s just an image mistake on the website, but it’s interesting either way.

    ESPN Shop

  • Mr. Met | July 31, 2006 at 6:36 pm |

    [quote comment=”3740″]Dear Apple Guy,

    Read all of the above back forth comments on Trent Dilfer (and his utter uselessness as an NFL QB), many points were made.

    Paul, have you addressed retired numbers in the past? An article has practically been outlined for you in the comments today.[/quote]
    Actually I don’t know if you’ve seen it, but that’s from a commercial for Apple Macs. Pretty ingenious to use that line if you ask me.

    And an article on retired numbers sounds ripe for the pickins to me too.

  • Mr. Met | July 31, 2006 at 6:40 pm |

    [quote comment=”3741″]check this out… the Ichiro jersey sold in the ESPN.com “ESPN Shop” has a serious issue… the picture shows a white home jersey, but the name and number font is from the dark alternates. i don’t know if that’s how it ships or if it’s just an image mistake on the website, but it’s interesting either way.[/quote]It’s probably just a mock-up for the website. The NFL shop has similar mistakes on its website (i.e. the Cleveland jerseys don’t have the “Browns” under the neckline) but the jerseys are made by whoever does the official team uniforms and come with the correct numbers, logos, etc. I ordered a Dolphins jersey once and the “Dolphins” was missing from the chest in the picture on the website, but the finished product was done corectly.

  • DP | July 31, 2006 at 7:16 pm |

    For as long as I remember, I have despised UCLA. Football. Basketball. Anything. Well, maybe not the ladies. Anyway, I have to admit, the uni change is a good move on their part. Especially if that is blue outline, and not black.

    This is coming from a lifelong Oregon Duck fan. Someday the UO will realize the value of creating tradition and class. Someday…

  • Jersey Mark | July 31, 2006 at 9:05 pm |

    Uni Watch Police Beware!
    During the ESPN broadcast of the Red Sox /Indians game, the announcer(not sure who) were talking about Manny’s uniform and his tendency to borrow pieces from his teamates,
    The one announcer says, “here is a good shot of Manny”(at the plate),, “always in fashion” and then, bam! A close-up shot of the Manny pajama pants, very discouraging!

  • Timeout | July 31, 2006 at 9:08 pm |

    Being a long time Trent Dilfer fan, and a fellow Fresno State Alum and Niner fan, I think it is great to see Trent wearing 12 with the Niners. There was a big article on Trent coming “home” to the Niners, his favorite team as a kid, a few weeks ago in the Fresno Bee. It also talked about him and Brodie becoming friends through recent charity work in the Bay Area and it being Brodie’s idea. I remember in the article Trent saying something about how he hopes to bring more attention to Brodie and help him get in the Hall of Fame. Guess it has sort of worked, seems like a lot of people are talking about it

  • Mr. Met | July 31, 2006 at 10:22 pm |

    [quote comment=”3748″]Uni Watch Police Beware!
    During the ESPN broadcast of the Red Sox /Indians game, the announcer(not sure who) were talking about Manny’s uniform and his tendency to borrow pieces from his teamates,
    The one announcer says, “here is a good shot of Manny”(at the plate),, “always in fashion” and then, bam! A close-up shot of the Manny pajama pants, very discouraging![/quote]
    Stuff like that is just wretched. It would be nice if the NFL had a set uniform protoccol like the NFL. Remember last year when Clinton Portis wore the wrong socks and cleats? While the black cleats looked sharp, the NFL did the right thing by coming down on him for altering his uniform. Oh to have MLB make it a rule that stirrups must be shown and fine the hell out of anyone who violates it!

  • Mr. Met | July 31, 2006 at 10:25 pm |

    I meant to say if MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL had a set uniform policy like the NFL. On a side note, wasn’t that one of Buck Showalter’s rules when he took over the Arizona Diamondbacks? If I’m not mistaken the team rules stated that players had to wear their uniform pants a certain number of inches above the ankle and show the logo on the stirrup. Obviously that is no longer in effect (one of Bob Brenly’s first acts as D-Backs manager was to trash Showalter and his rules), but does anyone know if the D-Backs even have a logo on their stirrups anymore?

  • Nolan | July 31, 2006 at 11:32 pm |

    [quote comment=”3709″][quote comment=”3701″][quote comment=”3683″]Boo! Ripping on Santo is the oldest and easiest journalism trick in the book. Shame on you, Uniwatch. I thought you were above such nonsense! Stick to the unis and leave the broadcast criticism to the players! And no, we’re not supposed to feel sorry for Ronny. shesh. *head shake*[/quote]

    I’ve heard Santo a few times and it’s time for him to hang em up…the guy is brutal. We have a similar situation here in San Diego. Long time Padres announcer Jerry Coleman is getting senile and just doesn’t have it anymore. Too bad Ted Leitner (aka Ron Burgundy) is waiting in the wings. But I have to say our TV guys, Matt Vasgersian, Mark Grant, and Tony Gwynn are the best. Sounds like you guys in Chicago have it rough.[/quote]

    B’ah! This is one Brewer fan still upset you guys stole Vasgersian from us. That guy is great!

    And Paul… no mention of the Brewers wearing Cerveceros jerseys this past Saturday? This was the first time they’ve ever done such a thing![/quote]

    That pic has Kevin Mench, who also wore the horrible Texas Rangers Los Rangers
    So, is he the only player in MLB history to wear two different spanish spelling jerseys in the same season?

  • Jack H. | August 1, 2006 at 12:10 am |

    [quote comment=”3683″]Boo! Ripping on Santo is the oldest and easiest journalism trick in the book. Shame on you, Uniwatch. I thought you were above such nonsense! Stick to the unis and leave the broadcast criticism to the players! And no, we’re not supposed to feel sorry for Ronny. shesh. *head shake*[/quote]

    Even if it is easy, you have to admit he still sucks.

  • Lane | August 1, 2006 at 12:18 am |

    [quote comment=”3701″][quote comment=”3683″]Boo! Ripping on Santo is the oldest and easiest journalism trick in the book. Shame on you, Uniwatch. I thought you were above such nonsense! Stick to the unis and leave the broadcast criticism to the players! And no, we’re not supposed to feel sorry for Ronny. shesh. *head shake*[/quote]

    I’ve heard Santo a few times and it’s time for him to hang em up…the guy is brutal. We have a similar situation here in San Diego. Long time Padres announcer Jerry Coleman is getting senile and just doesn’t have it anymore. Too bad Ted Leitner (aka Ron Burgundy) is waiting in the wings. But I have to say our TV guys, Matt Vasgersian, Mark Grant, and Tony Gwynn are the best. Sounds like you guys in Chicago have it rough.[/quote]

    Dude, I’ve heard Vasgersian only once, so maybe I caught him on the wrong day, but what I heard was flat out awful. You know how Keith Jackson can make a hail mary game winner sound like an off-tackle run for 2 yards? Well Vasgersian is the opposite extreme. The guy gets way, way too excited over absolutely everything. The game I watched was on MLB.tv against the Cardinals, and I thought he was going to rupture his spleen when the Padres went back to back. It was like the 3rd inning, chill…

  • Tako | August 1, 2006 at 12:23 am |

    absolutely nothing uni-related to say today, other than the giants’ gigantes jerseys are the best jerseys en espanol in the the league, but one name we have forgotten to mention in the worst broadcaster chase is tim mccarver, who nearly made me watch giants games on mute until enough listeners complained and he got the boot midway through the second half. he has to be the dumbest member of any broadcast team, and i dont think he’s old enough to blame it on senility.

  • Tako | August 1, 2006 at 12:26 am |
  • Dan Maratto | August 1, 2006 at 12:36 am |

    Dear Mr. Lukas,

    I love your column and your website.

    But why the undue harshness toward Ron Santo?

    Cubs fans love him, which should be enough.

    Even people who don’t like him still regard him as kind of a harmless old guy who’s funny to listen to.

    But an “embarrassment”?

    The biggest embarrassment in the history of sports broadcasting?

    Is that necessary?

    This guy has poured his heart out for his team since 1960. That, I think, is what defines loyalty, and is a very admirable quality in athletes, and in people in general. From your writing, it would have seemed to me that you would agree with that assessment.

    You can say that I am a delusional Cubs fan, or a sentimentalist, or whatever else you like, but the fact is, I turn the TV down and the radio up whenever the Cubbies are playing, because I’d much rather listen to Pat & Ron, even when they make no sense, than to the kind of bland, forced-friendly, fake enthusiastic banter which currently dominates most media coverage of sports.

    Whatever else he is, Ron Santo is not bland, and he is not fake. He is, to me, what a baseball player, and a baseball fan, should be: excited, passionate, eternally optimistic. To listen to him on a daily basis is quite enjoyable, contrary to what you may think based on a 30-second clip you downloaded off the internet for the purpose of banging out your latest blog entry.

    Finally, and perhaps most importantly, we are most definitely NOT supposed to feel sorry for him. He has never felt sorry for himself, and he would not want anyone else to, either.

  • Steve-O | August 1, 2006 at 1:34 am |

    I was watching the simpsons on sunday and it showed a shot of some baseball players from the springfield isotopes. and they were wearing stirrups!!! hooray whoever drew that scene.

  • Mr. Met | August 1, 2006 at 2:01 am |

    [quote comment=”3757″]The biggest embarrassment in the history of sports broadcasting?[/quote]

    Ron Santo is not even close. That would have to be John Sterling. At least with Santo you can just blame him being atrocious because of his age. And he probably makes up for it with some interesting anecdotes when the Cubbies are getting pounded. Sterling has absolutely NO redeeming factors whatsoever. When he was partnered with Michael Kay (another gem that one) and Charlie Steiner (ditto), it was enough to make your ears literally spew blood. And since Steiner and Sterling didn’t really care for each other, a typical Steiner and Sterling coverage of a game involved one-upmanship and each one trying to out-yell the other with his home-run call. It was horrid.

    On the other side of New York, you could probably throw Fran Healy into the mix as well. He was BRUTAL on Mets telecasts until Team Wilpoin wised-up and cut him loose when they opened up shop with SNY.

  • Scott W | August 1, 2006 at 4:12 am |

    [quote comment=”3758″]I was watching the simpsons on sunday and it showed a shot of some baseball players from the springfield isotopes. and they were wearing stirrups!!! hooray whoever drew that scene.[/quote]

    Good call Steve-O! I was going to mention that, but I see you beat me to it.

  • a arauz | August 1, 2006 at 10:17 am |

    [quote comment=”3740″]Dear Apple Guy,

    Read all of the above back forth comments on Trent Dilfer (and his utter uselessness as an NFL QB), many points were made.

    Paul, have you addressed retired numbers in the past? An article has practically been outlined for you in the comments today.[/quote]

    Whooooooooooooosh !!!!!!!

  • Matt | August 1, 2006 at 10:20 am |

    [quote comment=”3757″]Dear Mr. Lukas,

    I love your column and your website.

    But why the undue harshness toward Ron Santo?

    Cubs fans love him, which should be enough.

    Even people who don’t like him still regard him as kind of a harmless old guy who’s funny to listen to.

    But an “embarrassment”?

    The biggest embarrassment in the history of sports broadcasting?

    Is that necessary?

    This guy has poured his heart out for his team since 1960. That, I think, is what defines loyalty, and is a very admirable quality in athletes, and in people in general. From your writing, it would have seemed to me that you would agree with that assessment.

    You can say that I am a delusional Cubs fan, or a sentimentalist, or whatever else you like, but the fact is, I turn the TV down and the radio up whenever the Cubbies are playing, because I’d much rather listen to Pat & Ron, even when they make no sense, than to the kind of bland, forced-friendly, fake enthusiastic banter which currently dominates most media coverage of sports.

    Whatever else he is, Ron Santo is not bland, and he is not fake. He is, to me, what a baseball player, and a baseball fan, should be: excited, passionate, eternally optimistic. To listen to him on a daily basis is quite enjoyable, contrary to what you may think based on a 30-second clip you downloaded off the internet for the purpose of banging out your latest blog entry.

    Finally, and perhaps most importantly, we are most definitely NOT supposed to feel sorry for him. He has never felt sorry for himself, and he would not want anyone else to, either.[/quote]

    Bravo Dan! *standing and aplauding* You have stated so well what my original intentions were at the very beginning of this post. Well said!

  • Bill | August 1, 2006 at 11:15 am |

    [quote comment=”3698″][quote comment=”3690″]As far as Trent Dilfer using John Brodie’s number 12 this year, it’s because there is some sort of pre-existing relationship between the two. It’s not as if Brodie let just ANYONE use his number (although if Trent Dilfer doesn’t qualify as a “just anyone”…), but because they were buddies already, Brodie made the exception.

    Lee[/quote]
    I think the more disturbing trend is that NFL teams are allowing numbers to become “un-retired”. First it was the Seahawks with Steve Largent’s #80. Now granted, it was being used by Jerry Rice, bu we’re not talking the Jerry Rice of the Monatana-Young era, we’re talking about a Jerry Rice who was washed-up and didn’t want to face the obvious. Now a nobody like Trent Dilfer (and before anyone chimes in with “but he’s a Super Bowl winner”, I think if you mentioned that to Ray Lewis and the Raven defense from 2000 they would set you straight on who won that title that season) can have a jersey un-retired because he’s friends with the player. The NFL needs to step in and put a stop to this. Once retired, always retired, no matter what.[/quote]

    Unfortunately, numbers are retired by TEAMS, not the league – unless the league does a Wayne Gretzky or a Jackie Robinson and retires a number league-wide. I never liked the fact that MLB allowed people to “grandfather” and keep 42 if they had it already – I can see Mariano Rivera wearing it – his accomplishments would retire that number as a Yanjee anyway (and this is coming from a Mets fan!), but to see no talent hacks like Butch Huskey continue to wear 42 after it was retired was disgusting.

  • Bill | August 1, 2006 at 11:17 am |

    [quote comment=”3701″][quote comment=”3683″]Boo! Ripping on Santo is the oldest and easiest journalism trick in the book. Shame on you, Uniwatch. I thought you were above such nonsense! Stick to the unis and leave the broadcast criticism to the players! And no, we’re not supposed to feel sorry for Ronny. shesh. *head shake*[/quote]

    I’ve heard Santo a few times and it’s time for him to hang em up…the guy is brutal. We have a similar situation here in San Diego. Long time Padres announcer Jerry Coleman is getting senile and just doesn’t have it anymore. Too bad Ted Leitner (aka Ron Burgundy) is waiting in the wings. But I have to say our TV guys, Matt Vasgersian, Mark Grant, and Tony Gwynn are the best. Sounds like you guys in Chicago have it rough.[/quote]

    I am very lucky – I had Bob Murphy for the Mets for all those years (RIP Murph) and Gary Cohen is outstanding as well – on the radio now we get Howie Rose, who is very good, and TV gives us Keith Hernandez (take or leave), but also Ron Darling, who has been an excellent analyst.

  • Bill | August 1, 2006 at 11:24 am |

    [quote comment=”3724″][quote comment=”3705″]
    On a side note: with the big MLB trade deadline coming up (or gone already, if you’re reading this after 4 ET), what would you folks say is the WORST uni-related trade ever in any sport? For instance, if someone went from a beautiful classic jersey (Yankees, for instance) to a terrible abomination of aesthetics (say, original Devil Rays uni).[/quote]

    If you go to MLB.com front page, check out the photo for Sean Casey, traded today to the Tigers. The horrid dot matrix Nike undershirt is displayed prominently in the photo (2nd Flash slide after Utley). I like the Pirates classic “P” hats and the color scheme, but the yellow-on-black is the worst of the dot matrix sleeves I’ve seen. Casey lucked out by being traded to the Tigers – classy unis, ML-best record.

    On the subject of worst announcers, I submit Josh Lewin, play-by-play for the Rangers and Fox’s Joe Buck-in-training, as Lewin has been doing the Fox Saturday national afternoon broadcast. Ugh – as if the Texas heat isn’t bad enough, I get Lewin. Take me home to L.A. to the melodious voice of Sir Vin Scully.[/quote]

    My wife asked me about Josh Lewin by simply saying “Isn’t it kind of weird that a guy doing announcing on a national broadcast has a speech impediment?” I couldn’t have said it better myself.

  • Bill | August 1, 2006 at 11:39 am |

    [quote comment=”3759″][quote comment=”3757″]The biggest embarrassment in the history of sports broadcasting?[/quote]

    Ron Santo is not even close. That would have to be John Sterling. At least with Santo you can just blame him being atrocious because of his age. And he probably makes up for it with some interesting anecdotes when the Cubbies are getting pounded. Sterling has absolutely NO redeeming factors whatsoever. When he was partnered with Michael Kay (another gem that one) and Charlie Steiner (ditto), it was enough to make your ears literally spew blood. And since Steiner and Sterling didn’t really care for each other, a typical Steiner and Sterling coverage of a game involved one-upmanship and each one trying to out-yell the other with his home-run call. It was horrid.

    On the other side of New York, you could probably throw Fran Healy into the mix as well. He was BRUTAL on Mets telecasts until Team Wilpoin wised-up and cut him loose when they opened up shop with SNY.[/quote]

    AMEN! John Sterling is the absolute worst broadcaster in the long and storied history of broadcasting – no matter who he’s with. His homer calls are wretched “The Giam-bino!(shouldn’t that be the Giam-BALCO?)Jorgie Juiced One! (in the steroid era – nice touch!) An A-Bomb from A-Rod! (Most Yankee fans would like to bomb HIM) and that God-awful “The-uh-uh-uh-uh-uh-uh Yankees WIN!” (Sounds like some of the sounds you hear in the movies that you keep under your bed!)

  • Ian K | August 1, 2006 at 12:36 pm |

    [quote comment=”3752″]
    Bill said,

    That pic has Kevin Mench, who also wore the horrible Texas Rangers Los Rangers
    So, is he the only player in MLB history to wear two different spanish spelling jerseys in the same season?[/quote]

    What about Akinori Otsuka, who wore “Los Rangers” this season and “Padres” last season? Haha, I could go on about players who wore Gigantes/Cerveceros/Los Rangers in addition to the Padres, but you get the point.

    What if they did this for all the teams? Bravos? Nacionales? Calcetines Rojos?

    Bill- nice call on Lewin’s speech impediment. I wonder the same thing.

  • Mr. Met | August 1, 2006 at 12:49 pm |

    [quote comment=”3791″]AMEN! John Sterling is the absolute worst broadcaster in the long and storied history of broadcasting – no matter who he’s with. His homer calls are wretched “The Giam-bino!(shouldn’t that be the Giam-BALCO?)Jorgie Juiced One! (in the steroid era – nice touch!) An A-Bomb from A-Rod! (Most Yankee fans would like to bomb HIM) and that God-awful “The-uh-uh-uh-uh-uh-uh Yankees WIN!” (Sounds like some of the sounds you hear in the movies that you keep under your bed!)[/quote]
    Sterling sounds like a WWE wrestling announcer.

    The contrast is amazing. On the one hand you have guys like Vin Sully or Bob Murphy, understated masters of their craft with the ability to paint a picture through words, and on the other hand you have buffoons like Sterling, who acts like his home-run calls are the reason people tune into his broadcasts, a guy who couldn’t hold Scully or Murphy’s jock.

    On the other hand, I recall the Yankee anouncers on MSG, Al Trautwig, Dewayne Staats and Tony Kubek. Back in the days before King George controlled the airwaves, Kubek was Public Enemy #1 in the Yankee offices because he absolutely MURDERED Steinbrener and his personnel moves on the air. Keep in mind this was in the 80’s and early 90’s, before the Yankees went through their current renaissance. Eventually his outspokenness got him fired, but while he was on it was great listening to a guy who refused to sugarcoat anything. It was a marked departure from the bootlickers they have in the booth now (save for Jim Kaat).

  • Bill | August 1, 2006 at 3:02 pm |

    [quote comment=”3800″][quote comment=”3791″]AMEN! John Sterling is the absolute worst broadcaster in the long and storied history of broadcasting – no matter who he’s with. His homer calls are wretched “The Giam-bino!(shouldn’t that be the Giam-BALCO?)Jorgie Juiced One! (in the steroid era – nice touch!) An A-Bomb from A-Rod! (Most Yankee fans would like to bomb HIM) and that God-awful “The-uh-uh-uh-uh-uh-uh Yankees WIN!” (Sounds like some of the sounds you hear in the movies that you keep under your bed!)[/quote]
    Sterling sounds like a WWE wrestling announcer.

    The contrast is amazing. On the one hand you have guys like Vin Sully or Bob Murphy, understated masters of their craft with the ability to paint a picture through words, and on the other hand you have buffoons like Sterling, who acts like his home-run calls are the reason people tune into his broadcasts, a guy who couldn’t hold Scully or Murphy’s jock.

    On the other hand, I recall the Yankee anouncers on MSG, Al Trautwig, Dewayne Staats and Tony Kubek. Back in the days before King George controlled the airwaves, Kubek was Public Enemy #1 in the Yankee offices because he absolutely MURDERED Steinbrener and his personnel moves on the air. Keep in mind this was in the 80’s and early 90’s, before the Yankees went through their current renaissance. Eventually his outspokenness got him fired, but while he was on it was great listening to a guy who refused to sugarcoat anything. It was a marked departure from the bootlickers they have in the booth now (save for Jim Kaat).[/quote]

    Mr. Met – by the way, how DO you fit that giant baseball head through a doorway – you and I are cut from the same cloth. Favorite Bob Murphy-isms “Puffy white cumulous clouds…Pat Zachry, the lanky righthander from Waco, TX…The Mets win the damn thing 9-8…We’ll be back with the happy recap.” If Bob Sheppard is the voice of God, and I LOVE Bob Sheppard – then Bob Murphy’s voice was like perfectly blended hot chocolate on a cold winter night. I would watch the game and listen to the radio call back when we had to put up with Tim McCarver.

  • Nicole | August 1, 2006 at 3:27 pm |

    Black underbrims won’t end underbrim writing, we’ll just get underbrim writing in a multitude of pretty colors with Paint Pens

    Also, I’ll be forever grateful for the Ueck himself as our radio man here in Milwaukee. He’s on his way to senility, evidenced the other day when he called nearly every player the wrong name one inning (Billy Clark – a new “super Brewer” combo of Bill Hall and Brady Clark?) But he’s still damn good!

  • Nicole | August 1, 2006 at 3:29 pm |

    Oh, and I LONG for the day Boston wears Calcetines Rojos jerseys. Hilarious!

  • Mr. Met | August 1, 2006 at 5:05 pm |

    [quote comment=”3813″]Mr. Met – by the way, how DO you fit that giant baseball head through a doorway – you and I are cut from the same cloth. Favorite Bob Murphy-isms “Puffy white cumulous clouds…Pat Zachry, the lanky righthander from Waco, TX…The Mets win the damn thing 9-8…We’ll be back with the happy recap.” If Bob Sheppard is the voice of God, and I LOVE Bob Sheppard – then Bob Murphy’s voice was like perfectly blended hot chocolate on a cold winter night. I would watch the game and listen to the radio call back when we had to put up with Tim McCarver.[/quote]
    Aside from the “Mets win the damn thing” quote, my absolute favorite has to be his call in Game 6 of the ’86 World Series when Ray Knight scored the improbable winning run. “The Mets will win the ball game…. the Mets win…. THEY WIN!!!!” I’m a guy who prefers the detached analytical style to the rah-rah homer style, but Murph’s emotion when he called that was so heartfelt, I prefer that call over Vin Scully’s any day.

  • Mr. Met | August 1, 2006 at 5:22 pm |

    [quote comment=”3817″]Also, I’ll be forever grateful for the Ueck himself as our radio man here in Milwaukee. He’s on his way to senility, evidenced the other day when he called nearly every player the wrong name one inning (Billy Clark – a new “super Brewer” combo of Bill Hall and Brady Clark?) But he’s still damn good![/quote]
    When they start losing it is when you get some classic moments. I recall a Met game (and we’re going back a ways here) where Tim McCarver and Ralph Kiner were discussing Joe Sambito taking #7 when he joined the Mets (his old number from his previous team was unavailable at the time). McCarver goes into this spiel about how #7 in New York is a great number and how New York fans should recognize the #7 and how much history and home runs go with it. Now most fans at this point are thinking “Mickey Mantle”, but Ralph busts out “Ol’ Eddie Kranepool”, an old Miracle Met. McCarver tries to nudge him in the right direction by pointing ou that he was referring to Mickey Mantle. Ralph says “oh yeah, he was pretty good too!” That had me in stitches the whole ballgame.

  • Elmo | August 2, 2006 at 1:02 am |

    You really ought to be embarassed to make the cheap shot about Santo. I trust you are a praying man. You have a lot to get right whenever you are compelled to pray again.

    [This is where Goat Riders started to mobilize the troops, as you can probably tell from the colorful language from here on. -webmaster ed.]

  • Cheri | August 2, 2006 at 1:31 am |

    uniwatch, you’re a jerk. If you actually listened to all of Ron’s broadcasts instead of snippets, you’d find Ron knows the game and has insightful comments in the middle of the silliness and joking. Cubs fans NEED some levity, don’t you get it? And making fun of the amputations(insert pants/stirrups joke here)? How low can you go? No, we don’t feel sorry for Ronnie because he’s had amputations. We respect him because he doesn’t feel sorry for himself. We respect him because he’s out there every day putting his heart and soul into his beloved “Cubbies” no matter how they disappoint him. We respect him because he’s done tremendous work for juvenile diabetics (wanna make fun of kids with diabetes while you’re at it?) and if you really want to learn about Ron, why not try watching “This Old Cub”. If you don’t feel ashamed of what you’ve written after watching it, well, you’ve got no soul.

  • Kevin M. | August 2, 2006 at 1:31 am |

    Wow. Taking cheap shots at Ron Santo. It’s one thing to mock his broadcasting style, but to pick on him because he lost his legs? That’s despicable. You’re an idiot.

  • Cheri | August 2, 2006 at 1:35 am |

    [quote comment=”3780″][quote comment=”3757″]Dear Mr. Lukas,

    I love your column and your website.

    But why the undue harshness toward Ron Santo?

    Cubs fans love him, which should be enough.

    Even people who don’t like him still regard him as kind of a harmless old guy who’s funny to listen to.

    But an “embarrassment”?

    The biggest embarrassment in the history of sports broadcasting?

    Is that necessary?

    This guy has poured his heart out for his team since 1960. That, I think, is what defines loyalty, and is a very admirable quality in athletes, and in people in general. From your writing, it would have seemed to me that you would agree with that assessment.

    You can say that I am a delusional Cubs fan, or a sentimentalist, or whatever else you like, but the fact is, I turn the TV down and the radio up whenever the Cubbies are playing, because I’d much rather listen to Pat & Ron, even when they make no sense, than to the kind of bland, forced-friendly, fake enthusiastic banter which currently dominates most media coverage of sports.

    Whatever else he is, Ron Santo is not bland, and he is not fake. He is, to me, what a baseball player, and a baseball fan, should be: excited, passionate, eternally optimistic. To listen to him on a daily basis is quite enjoyable, contrary to what you may think based on a 30-second clip you downloaded off the internet for the purpose of banging out your latest blog entry.

    Finally, and perhaps most importantly, we are most definitely NOT supposed to feel sorry for him. He has never felt sorry for himself, and he would not want anyone else to, either.[/quote]

    Bravo Dan! *standing and aplauding* You have stated so well what my original intentions were at the very beginning of this post. Well said![/quote]
    Joining the standing applause for Dan!!

  • Old Number 7 | August 2, 2006 at 8:13 am |

    You’re a real MR’er and a big-time c-sucker not to mention a classless A-hole for making an off-color remark about a man like Ron Santo.

  • Craig | August 2, 2006 at 8:46 am |

    But seriously, is there a bigger embarrassment on the airwaves than this guy?

    Well, once somebody is stupid enough to let you on the air, then you’ll outdo everybody by a wide mile.

    Pat and Ron are about the only thing that makes the Cubs worth watching/listening to.

    The only thing you’ve done is shown what a dickhead you are.

  • Blizzardlane | August 2, 2006 at 9:21 am |

    Stick with the fashion writing, maybe even the broadcast criticism, dude. But Ron Santo is a bigger, better and more beloved man, even with the ravages of his disease, than you’ll ever be.

  • Bill | August 2, 2006 at 11:00 am |

    I’ve never heard Ron Santo do a game – I would imagine it’s a lot like Kiner, who also came back from illness. I’ll have to listen on MLB.com to a Cubs game to see and make my own opinion.

  • R.U. Serious | August 2, 2006 at 11:22 am |

    VERY classy to undermine someone’s lifelong struggle with a debilitating illness. I guess you’re off to the VA hospital to ridicule the cripples next. YOU are the one whom I pity, not Ron Santo. Study his life and you’ll uncover some much-needed examples on how to be a man.

  • Matt H | August 2, 2006 at 11:31 am |

    You are a douche bag. I am a huge Cubs fan and don’t like Santo that much but were do you get off ragging on him for having diabetes. You are a low life son of a bitch and I hope you fail in everything you do in life. Be considerite there are other people out there with diabetes. You are just a washed up nobody who needs to inslut someone to make themselves fell better about yousrself.

  • Jason | August 2, 2006 at 11:46 am |

    Get a life. Theres only one embarrassment in sports writing/broadcasting, and it wasn’t the subject of your insensitive remarks about Ron Santo. Heres a hint: Find a mirror. I just know listening to Cubs games would be sooo much better with boring, Cubs hating ESPN braodcasters. Stick to your uniforms and leave Cubs Legends alone.

  • T.S | August 2, 2006 at 12:21 pm |

    You sadden me. I feel sorry I have share the same air with you…. Do you like making fun of people with diseases or are you just an incompetent writer who can’t write s good column? Embracement? Why don’t you write about the work he has done for JDRF.. What you don’t know what that means you say JDRF is Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. Mr. Santo raises a lot of money for them but I Guess we should not feel sorry for those kids. Has you would put they are an embracement!!!!

  • john | August 2, 2006 at 12:48 pm |

    Ok admitting that Santo’s not a well polished announcer, and based on purely his announcing he is not very good. But, the reason he is so beloved by cubs fans, myself included is because (1) he was a great cub both with his play and his attitude, (2) he work w/ the JDF alone is hall worthy, which by the way the take actions off the feild into account when its a negative shouldn’t positive contributions count as well towards the hall, and (3) Ronny lives and dies with the each cubs play, mostly the later this year, and as such he represents the people bleeding Cubbie to who do the same, what he says on air I feel. And by the way a former “homer” announcer by the name of Harry Carry was also beloved and was even satired on SNL which was done with much more class and humor than you comments. By the way I beleive the special olympics is comming up soon to. I plan on you ripping those athletes as well.

  • sam | August 2, 2006 at 12:55 pm |

    Apparently you’ve never listened to Mike Shannon or 80% of the other radio broadcasters. Or Jon Miller and Joe Morgan. Or Ron Santo’s replacement, Dave Otto. Santo’s amputeed legs both have more class than you ever will.

    Most Cubs fans love Santo, and his endearing qualities are part of what makes listening to him fun. You don’t have to like it, and I totally understand why most non-Cubs fans don’t.

    So, turn your dial back to Dr. Phil, Strictly Sex with Dr. Drew, or whatever you need to listen to.

    Or use it for what you really need to—taking a plunge into your bathtub.

  • southernilcubfan | August 2, 2006 at 1:00 pm |

    I have never read this blog before, and it is a safe bet now I never will again. Your comments regarding Ron Santo were tasteless and totally uncalled for. At least Ron is a genuine fan who cares about the team he works for and not a New York-Boston loving ESPN cronie. Leave your idiotic musings to uniforms.

  • Lou | August 2, 2006 at 1:11 pm |

    The biggest embarrassment on the airwaves occurs the second you ever speak into a mic. Ron Santo has raised millions of dollars for JDRF research…and what did you do today? Put on a dress and log on the internet from your local library?

    Take a note from half the players that ever put on a uniform and issue a dull apology for saying something stupid about a subject you have very little comprehension of.

    Lou

  • ben | August 2, 2006 at 1:58 pm |

    I don’t feel sorry for Ron–I feel sorry for you, a “journalist” so insecure he feels the need to knock a great guy who, admittedly, is a much better third baseman than announcer (and if you haven’t figured it out, it’s not his broadcasting skills that keep him in the job), for his disease. Make fun of his “Awww, geez…” all you want, you’ll never be half the man he is.

  • Dave | August 2, 2006 at 3:53 pm |

    [quote comment=”3889″]But seriously, is there a bigger embarrassment on the airwaves than this guy?

    Well, once somebody is stupid enough to let you on the air, then you’ll outdo everybody by a wide mile.

    Pat and Ron are about the only thing that makes the Cubs worth watching/listening to.

    The only thing you’ve done is shown what a dickhead you are.[/quote]

    Right on….

  • Brian | August 2, 2006 at 4:30 pm |

    Actually its quite enjoyable listening to the ‘hokum’ everyday you moron.

  • John | August 2, 2006 at 4:32 pm |

    Nice work Paul, it’s because of idiotic commentary like this that bloggs have such a poor reputation with “mainstream media”. Now that you’ve taken on a great guy that does wonders for this world, maybe you could take on the volunteers at homeless shelters and food kitchens throughout the nation too.

  • Curtis | August 2, 2006 at 4:44 pm |

    Find a ledge on a tall building and jump off. Nobody will miss you. I can’t say the same thing, however for the millions of people who will miss Ron Santo when he passes.

  • Adam | August 2, 2006 at 5:12 pm |

    The Santo comment was low class. You should be ashamed.

  • kevin | August 2, 2006 at 5:33 pm |

    I can’t believe that you just said that about Santo. Ron Santo is the biggest and most dedicated Chicago Cubs fan ever. Sometimes his skills at radio broadcasting vanish from time to time, but taking a shot at the fact that diabetes took away his legs. Perhaps one day you can leave your computer screen long enough to come down to 1060 West Addison and tell Ronnie to his face what a Hokum he is. Watch out for that prostetic leg, i hear they can do some real damage to the babymakers.

  • cubsfan | August 2, 2006 at 5:57 pm |

    You’re a prick. I hope you die a painful death you douche.

  • Mike | August 2, 2006 at 6:34 pm |

    You sir, are a complete f#cking moron. Hopefully someone runs you over and pisses Cubbie blue on you.

  • Jason | August 2, 2006 at 6:35 pm |

    Anyone who has listened to more than one Cubs radio broadcast would know that the back and forth between Ron and Pat about one another’s looks is a running gag. Pat always tells Ron how good he looks and Ron tells Pat how average he looks.

    In any case, the comments about Santo’s disabilities are classless.

  • Joe | August 2, 2006 at 7:14 pm |

    You Suck, asshole

  • Tom | August 2, 2006 at 7:48 pm |

    You are so classless to make comments like that. Santo is so respectful of other people and players and you come out with some low blows like that? Santo is in the booth because he is a die hard fan and is pissed when cubs fans are pissed, happy when we are happy and heartbroken when we are. Do us a favor Paul and stick to reviewing unis. The man was a living legend in his time and is beloved by cubs fans. Also my father grew up watching Santo play and also has diabetes, and looks up to Santo for his strength to get over the loss of his legs. When he read your jokes about Santo being legless he wanted to punch you in the face. You may two more legs than Santo, but Ron has two more balls than you have Paul

  • Patrick | August 2, 2006 at 8:21 pm |

    Paul,

    Your comments just weren’t very funny. I don’t care whether you appreciate Santo or his broadcasting skills or not… You’ll notice you’re getting a lot of reactions as if you were ripping on someone’s amputee grandpa… The Cubs and their fans love the guy… so do I.

    However, to wish harm on you or ill will is fairly lame… If anyone reallllly wants to show their distaste for your comments, they’ll just go read another blog or not read your articles on ESPN…. or better yet, step up and make a donation in Ron’s name:

    Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation

    Considering Ron’s character and nature, I think that would be the best service to his name. Paul, maybe one day you will see how that character has made so many people react the way they did to your off-handed and callow comments.

  • David Arnott | August 2, 2006 at 8:43 pm |

    Hey Paul, don’t let these people get you down. You know, the ones who can’t separate different aspects of a person’s life and feel that just because someone was a great ballplayer, his broadcasting is above reproach.

    From the most mature response I’ve seen, because the juvenile comments don’t deserve response: “Whatever else he is, Ron Santo is not bland, and he is not fake. He is, to me, what a baseball player, and a baseball fan, should be: excited, passionate, eternally optimistic.”

    That’s not what a broadcaster’s main duty is. Mike Krukow lives and dies for the Giants, and people still accuse him of homerism, but first and foremost HE TELLS THE TRUTH. I’ve heard Cubs broadcasts, and Santo’s schtick has nothing to do with telling the truth. It’s tired. It’s pandering. If you are eternally optimistic, you might not be telling the truth. I’m sorry. That’s the way it is. If the Cubs suck, someone needs to say it in so many words. Here’s something to chew on, Cubs fans, which I’m actually kind of afraid to post on the Goat Riders site, because there are apparently a bunch of fourteen-year-olds there, but would Santo be so tolerated if he wasn’t stricken with diabetes? I don’t know if this is what Paul’s getting at, but he clearly separates the diabetes from the criticism. Argue all you want about the joke’s tastelessness, but hurling epithets because Paul thinks your announcer is a joke is itself a joke.

  • Chris | August 2, 2006 at 9:30 pm |

    I’m sure you’ve gotten enough of these already.
    Calling Ron Santo an embarrassment?
    As if your site wasn’t?

    Then, to low-blow him with comment about diabetes and amputations?
    The man is a survivor.
    He’s battled diabetes all his life (without a complaint), dealt with the hardships of becoming an amputee, and even worse, the hardships of being a Cubs fan.

    Given the circumstances, I’d say he’s doing pretty darn well. Give it a rest.

  • Noah | August 2, 2006 at 9:38 pm |

    Wow. I thought you just sucked as a writer. It turns out you pretty much suck as a human being, too.

  • jackson | August 2, 2006 at 9:43 pm |

    (insert crappy-writer-with-no-redeeming-qualities joke here)

  • pulling | August 2, 2006 at 9:46 pm |

    If you really wanted to give the full picture of Ron Santo as it relates to your purported topic, you’d have mentioned (and maybe even posted pictures of) the prosthetic he had painted to look like his uniform pant leg.

    But then, that’s not nearly as much fun as joking about his need for the prosthetic, right?

  • Cheri | August 3, 2006 at 12:40 am |

    Now Mr. Uniwatch, I’m sure you’re a Real Man, despite all that underwear watching.
    We all respect your right to voice your opinions. You can do that by showing up at Wrigley Field (please let us know when and where you’ll be sitting) and let all the fans in on your thoughts about Ron and his disabilities. Try and get a bleacher seat.
    Oh, and while you’re at it, let the Cubs organization know you’re coming. They may invite you down into the locker room to, you know, sign some autographs for you. I bet Zambrano might even give you his own special greeting.
    Scared???

  • Kobes | August 3, 2006 at 2:18 am |

    Ron Santo comments on a game. A game in which he announces with the same enthusiasm and passion as he once played. He speaks for the fans as one of the greatest Cubs fans. True fans appreciate the candor of the games he calls with Pat, and the banter they share.
    Thank you to the Goatriders who alerted patrons to this travesty of a column from Uni Watch, a truly tactless and academic piece.
    David, who is afraid to post on Goatriders, hit the nail right on the head. Santo is only employable because he is an amputee and WGN pities him. Good call.
    Ron Santo was seen by many as a hero on the field many years ago, a status he has exponentially emulated as a champion for diabetes. If only all teams could have a true fan-at-heart announcer in the booth. Thanks Ron.
    Go Cubs!

  • Charles | August 5, 2006 at 3:13 am |

    As a die hard Cubs fan, listening to Ron Santo is one of my favorite things. I have nothing but respect for the guy. He is sometimes a bit off, but I love the emotion he shows on air. He gets me excited about the game. Try listening to the Sox or the Cards, their radio broadcasters can put you to sleep. Pat and Ron are always interesting and exciting. Go Cubs!