Court Date

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Arguably the greatest individual performance in the annals of team sports took place 50 years ago today — March 2, 1962. That was when Wilt Chamberlain scored 100 points in a single game, leading the Philadelphia Warriors to a 169-147 victory over the New York Knicks.

That game didn’t actually take place in Philly, though. It was at the Hershey Sports Arena. The 76ers recently purchased the court from that game (it had been in storage) and are parceling it out in various ways. Part of it will go the Basketball Hall of Fame. Another part will be incorporated into the new practice facility that the Sixers plan to build within the next few years. And another part was cut up into 20,000 two-inch-square pieces, which will be given away to all fans attending tonight’s Philly/Golden State game. (Golden State, of course, is the same franchise Wilt was playing for 50 years ago. Very cool that they’re the Sixers’ opponent for this game, and kudos to the NBA schedulers for slating this match-up on the golden anniversary of Wilt’s 100-point night.)

When I first heard about this, I was a little leery. Cutting up a piece of history? Yikes. But then the Sixers sent me a piece of the court (shown above), and I have to admit that it’s a very nifty little thing to have, especially since they’re giving it away instead of selling it. And besides, it’s not like the court was doing anyone any good stowed away in a warehouse. (’Course, it helps that I got a green piece — favorite color and all, don’tcha know.)

I’m off to see my Mom today, and Phil is busy with jury duty, so everyone play nice, okay? Okay.

Shown below: the underside of my piece of the court.

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Pretty ballsy: You probably know that each college basketball team gets to use the ball of its choice at home. So one team may use a Nike ball, another may use an Adidas ball, and so on. But have you ever thought about whether the different balls present challenges for the road team? I hadn’t, until I read this super-interesting article. Did you know, for example, that Wisconsin — and only Wisconsin, at least among the six major conferences — uses balls made by a small company called Sterling? I’d never even heard of that brand before. Anyway, the article is a fascinating read (translation: Wish I’d written it myself). Highly recommended.

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Uni Watch News Ticker: Very sad story about how my alma mater sold its soul and is now paying the price. … Odd uni match-up the other night, as LSU hoops chose to wear gold at home, and Tennessee wore white. … Alex Giobbi notes that Catholic University has some pretty rad warm-up gear for a D3 school. … New roadside logo — in three different fonts — for the Milwaukee airport (from David Eric Boll). … A.J. Frey notes that the Mets are wearing their Gary Carter memorial patch on their BP jerseys. … Ole Miss has a pitcher named Mike Mayers (pronounced MY-urs), so — well, you can probably guess (from Michael Martin). … Here’s the best Pirates logo timeline you’ll ever see. … Two high school baseball teams in Arkansas are going to play a game while wearing boots, as part of a promotion to raise funds for veterans. “I’ll try to get you some pictures after they play the game,” says Joey Potts. … You know this was coming: a Jeremy Lin infographic (from Brad Eckensberger). … Here’s the official soccer ball for the 2012 Olympics (from Kenny Loo). … North Dakota has reached the point of cutting off its nose to spite its face over this “Fighting Sioux” thing (thanks, Brinke). … Awesome sweaters in this 1908 Cubs team portrait (from BSmile). … The Magic did the “el basketball-o” thing. As usual, I got a few e-mails saying, more or less, “It should be La Magia, not El Magic,” and apparently SportsCenter had something similar to say. But as I’ve explained many times, the NBA’s market research shows that most Hispanic fans really do refer to the teams as “El Magic” and “Los Bulls” and so on. … The might Fleer Sticker Project has come up with a bunch of new (to me) photos of the Orioles in solid orange. … Here’s a pretty good video showing Jose Bautista talking gloves with a Wilson rep (from Marc Bauche). … While looking for something else, I came across some veeeery interesting photos. First, check out the uniforms on these sanitation works at Yankee Stadium, circa 1942. Second, here’s a rare shot of the Astrodome with grass. And here’s the real prize: a 1963 shot of Hammerin’ Hank with massive NOB lettering — including a first initial! That’s because his brother Tommie was also on the team. … Really interesting article on the history of athletes who change their names. … Check it out: the world’s largest curling rock! Details here (from William Scheibler). … “I wouldn’t mind having this Notre Dame hoops jersey,” says Dan Cichalski. It’s an odd design — why put the number off-center, like on a baseball jersey? And what’s with the tapering insignia? Fun but weird. … Here are this year’s kits for the K-League (i.e., Korean soccer). One of the teams — Gwangju FC — is going with THOB (Twitter handle on back). Further details on that here (all this from Dan, who didn’t give his last name). … Steve Mandich wonders if anyone knows the story behind this photo of Ichiro in soccer jersey. … You have to like a catalog whose cover is emblazoned with “The Right Uniform at the Right Price,” even if they’re talking about gas station uniforms. … Oregon State wore their turquoise uniforms last night. … When my parents got married, they chose Feb. 22 as their wedding day because it was Washington’s Birthday. “That way, we figured our anniversary would always be a holiday,” my father once explained to me. Then the Uniform Monday Holiday Act came along, effectively creating Presidents’ Day, which scuttled my parents’ plans. Now there’s a legislative initiative to restore Washington’s Birthday. Too bad my father isn’t around to see it — he’d be pleased.

 

161 comments to Court Date

  • Bas | March 2, 2012 at 7:43 am |

    is that Roger Craig pitching to Hammerin Hank? Sweet

    • Ricko | March 2, 2012 at 8:18 am |

      re: “H.AARON”. Musta been when Hank’s brother Tommie was with the Braves.

      We do realize that the most prolific home run hitting brother duo in baseball history is Hank and Tommie Aaron, right?

      Hank had 755, Tommie had 13.

    • Dan Theman | March 2, 2012 at 8:53 am |

      That’s like saying Wayne and Brent Gretzky hold the NHL record for most combined points by two brothers.

      (2857 for Wayne and 4 for Brent)

      • Ricko | March 2, 2012 at 9:11 am |

        Nevertheless…

        Also, Christy Mathewson’s brother Henry was 0-1 lifetime

        Still, between them they won 373 games, didn’t they.

        • Ricko | March 2, 2012 at 9:16 am |

          Eclipsed at least by the Perrys (Jim and Gaylord), who combined for over 500 wins.

        • Chance Michaels | March 2, 2012 at 10:18 am |

          Robin Yount and his brother Larry played in 2,857 games (2,856 & 1, respectively).

        • mike 2 | March 2, 2012 at 11:41 am |

          The Perrys are also eclipsed by the Niekros

    • pushbutton | March 2, 2012 at 11:10 am |

      I have an unnatural love for behind-the-plate photos taken at the Polo Grounds; the clubhouse windows in the distant background, a couple of them propped open…the P.A. speaker horns above….

      Mets jersey w/ no number on front…huge Milwaukee NOB, which is rare enough to see anytime….

      You pushed all of pushbutton’s buttons with that.

      • Tom V. | March 2, 2012 at 11:45 am |

        Not sure if you’re familiar with a show called “Pawn Stars”, some guy had one of the PA horns from the Polo Grounds and was trying to sell it.

        • pushbutton | March 2, 2012 at 4:09 pm |

          I’d like to have seen that! I’d like to know the whole history of it; if it was used or just went into storage, etc. Fascinating.

      • Michael Emody | March 2, 2012 at 5:07 pm |

        I think when baseball teams first began using NOB’s, some teams tended to go with bigger letters, and smaller numbers. I guess they figured people wouldn’t be able to read them from high in the stands… who knows. The White Sox were the first, and they’re NOB were just as huge thru 71 (though maybe a bit thinner- there might be a second color outline on the Brave’s Aaron lettering.) I know the Reds and Tigers were also had big NOB’s, along with smaller numbers. The Reds kept the style into the 80’s.

        I’m sure some other teams in the 60’s did, too. “MLB Game Worn Jerseys of the Double-Knit Era” is great for so many things, but starts in the early 70’s – most of the NOB experimentation was with 60’s flannels. The A’s has some strange combo’s.

        • Donald Pittman | March 3, 2012 at 1:51 am |

          Mitchell and Ness have re-created Hank Arron’s ’63 Braves Uni with the NOB, there is a navy blue outline around the name and number. It’s available here >>> http://www.mitchella...

    • John English | March 2, 2012 at 11:23 am |

      Jeez, he looked 100 years old even when he was playing.

  • The Jeff | March 2, 2012 at 7:43 am |

    If I ran North Dakota’s athletic program, I’d go ahead and remove the native imagery and call the teams the “Fighting Su”.

    • Phil Hecken | March 2, 2012 at 7:50 am |

      which is why you’re not running north dakota’s athletic program

    • Chris Holder | March 2, 2012 at 9:17 am |

      Could they use Johnny Cash as a mascot, and use “A Boy Named Sue” as their new fight song?

      • Chris Holder | March 2, 2012 at 9:19 am |

        Note to self: read ALL replies before posting…

        • Arr Scott | March 2, 2012 at 6:15 pm |

          No, the fail’s on me for screwing up my reply so it didn’t attach to the relevant comment.

  • Arr Scott | March 2, 2012 at 7:56 am |

    Or the Fighting Sues:

    http://www.youtube.c...

    • Ricko | March 2, 2012 at 8:08 am |

      Someone suggested ND take its name from railroad that was a big part of the area’s history, The Soo Line.

      Change logo to a locomotive and be the…
      North Dakota Fighting Soo.

      Works for me.

      • Ricko | March 2, 2012 at 8:53 am |

        Check the map. The Soo Line served that part of the country…
        http://en.wikipedia....

        My second wife’s grandfather lived out that way, worked his entire life for the Soo Line Railroad.

        • Ricko | March 2, 2012 at 9:01 am |

          And “Soo” isn’t some derogatory spin on Sioux.

          It’s from “sault”, which is French for a waterfall or rapids (Sault St. Marie, for example, often is called “The Soo”).

  • Dumb Guy | March 2, 2012 at 7:59 am |

    Can’t….stop….myself. ….Must….say…..it…:

    LINFOGRAPHIC!

    • Tom V. | March 2, 2012 at 9:39 am |

      Good one. Although it says Lin scored 134 in his first 5 games, linfographic shows 135 widgets.

  • Anthony Verna | March 2, 2012 at 8:04 am |

    How Spanish speakers do not translate NBA teams reminds me that Francophones do not translate NHL teams. “Ce sont Les Flyers.”

    That was strange to me when my pen pal from Quebec back in high school referred to them, but the team name is a proper name – even if in baseball it is not as consistent. That’s language.

    C’est une exception!

    • Jason M (DC) | March 2, 2012 at 9:54 am |

      It’s funny how language and culture chooses to translate names.
      The Spanish-speaking world takes the time to translate the names of American figures, like Jorge Washington.
      Normally, I want the NBA to switch the names to La Magia, etc. But I understand them keeping it and the Spanish-speaking fans referring to them as El Magic. Since it’s the name of the team.

    • Whirling Darvish | March 2, 2012 at 10:32 am |

      Nobody translates ‘Real Madrid’ to ‘Royal Madrid’ when speaking about them in English. However people do use the English names of the cities when referring to soccer teams, hence ‘Bayern Munich’ rather than Bavaria Munich (all English) or Bayern München (all German).

      So in the NBA we have Los Bulls and El Magic but when displaying a city name the Knicks put Nueva York on their jerseys.

      • Ricardo Leonor | March 2, 2012 at 12:49 pm |

        Even though it would not be grammatically correct. We native spanish speakers, when speaking amongst ourselves would refer to them as “Los Magic”. Just like we would say “Los Red Sox” instead of Las Medias Rojas. We really don’t translate the team names….but then again we would never add the “Los” to a team uniform.

      • Jason M (DC) | March 2, 2012 at 1:37 pm |

        I always wondered what Bayern meant.

        Also, it’s notable that the Spanish-speaking world tends to translate American or English city names. But we don’t translate Spanish cities to English. It’s one thing for an old city like London to be called “Londres.” And it’s another for New York to be “Nueva York.” Ok, maybe someone can correct me, but I’ve heard Salt Lake City referred to as Lago Salado. Maybe it was just the circles that I ran in. Not 100%.

        But we certainly don’t call it Yellow, Texas. (Amarillo.)

        • Ricardo Leonor | March 2, 2012 at 10:58 pm |

          To be honest the only American City that we when speaking spanish we translate is New York…even we native New Yorkers will call it Nueva York. But we never ever say Nueva Jersey!! Also we will spell Filadelfia…but sides that and Nuevo Mexico, we really treat them as proper nouns….

    • apk3000 | March 2, 2012 at 2:50 pm |

      Well, I think the difference that Latinos may say “Los Bulls” because it’s a proper name and NBA is taking the easy way out of “that’s how they refer to the team”. Whereas the Brewers went the extra distance of “what if we were a Latino nation, what would we call the team?”

      • Michael Emody | March 2, 2012 at 4:43 pm |

        I believe there’s a “Cerveceria’s” in the Mexican Baseball League, so it made sense fro Milwaukee to use a name that’s familiar to Mexican fan’s and means the same thing.

  • Dumb Guy | March 2, 2012 at 8:05 am |

    That ’08 Cubs photo is the epitome of uniformity.

    • Mark in Shiga | March 2, 2012 at 11:33 am |

      I really want one of those sweaters. What color are they? Gray? Beige?

      Powder blue?

      • Phil Hecken | March 2, 2012 at 1:19 pm |

        pink

        apparently they got beat up a lot

        • Mark in Shiga | March 2, 2012 at 2:07 pm |

          Phil, in most other years you could get away with saying that, but back when Frank Chance and Mordecai Brown were in charge, the Cubs were the ones handing out the beatings!

      • Michael Emody | March 2, 2012 at 5:09 pm |

        Probably grey or beige. The Cubs caps and logo were black that year.

    • Adam R. W. | March 2, 2012 at 3:43 pm |

      Anybody else notice the guy 5th from the right is missing his Cubs logo?

  • lose remerswaal | March 2, 2012 at 8:06 am |

    those Orioles uniforms look gray to me.

    Anyone else?

    ;)

  • JamesP. | March 2, 2012 at 8:10 am |

    Happy Stirrup Friday, comrades! http://i313.photobuc...

    • Ricko | March 2, 2012 at 8:20 am |

      It’s Max Alvis!

      • Ricko | March 2, 2012 at 8:23 am |

        No, wait. Could be Minnie Minoso.

        • JamesP. | March 2, 2012 at 9:07 am |

          Ha! Actually they are game worn Tampa Rays stirrups from last seasion’s 1951 Tampa Smokers throwback game.

          I’m still not happy that the red bled into the white as I can’t get that pink out!

        • Ricko | March 2, 2012 at 9:12 am |

          Ohdarn.

          I was so enjoying the Rocky Colavito flashbacks.

        • JamesP. | March 2, 2012 at 9:41 am |

          Ricko, I never noticed how close the 1951 Smokers stirrups and the 1959 Indans stirrups were: http://www.grandstan...

    • jdreyfuss | March 2, 2012 at 9:53 am |

      I don’t have any stirrups. :(
      The Collective will be pleased that I am putting forth the entirety of the effort I am capable of. I’m wearing striped socks.

      • Phil Hecken | March 2, 2012 at 1:22 pm |

        “I don’t have any stirrups. :(“

        ~~~

        collective requires you to surrender membership card at once

        • JamesP. | March 2, 2012 at 2:44 pm |

          Paging Comrade Marshall, Comrade Robert Marshall…

          jdreyfuss – look here: http://robertmarshal...

  • Jeremy Brahm | March 2, 2012 at 8:19 am |

    Ichiro is wearing a Vissel Kobe uniform from the J-League. Ichiro is still a god in Kobe because he played in the city for the Orix Blue Wave before coming to the US.

  • Mike V. | March 2, 2012 at 8:41 am |

    That Pirates logo timeline is literally adding insult to injury.

    • Simply Moono | March 2, 2012 at 9:23 am |

      ^^THIS

    • Gusto44 | March 2, 2012 at 9:59 am |

      Bucs caught a break with that injury. Burnett will be out just 2-4 weeks, could have been far worse.

      • Mike V. | March 2, 2012 at 10:14 am |

        Glad to hear that. I have been hearing 4-6 plus time to get his arm back in shape. It is also fortunate that it happened early in spring training. We have a month before the season even starts.

      • Phil Hecken | March 2, 2012 at 1:24 pm |

        “Burnett will be out just 2-4 weeks, could have been far worse.”

        ~~~

        yes, it could have just been a couple days

        • Mike V. | March 2, 2012 at 1:43 pm |

          Why Phil? Why with the salt in the wound! I’m trying to keep my hopes up through April this year.

    • Jet | March 2, 2012 at 10:54 am |

      How is it I’ve NEVER seen that 1960-1967 Pirates logo?! I started following baseball in 1965. It looks like something drawn by R.Crumb or a Mad magazine artist!

      -Jet

  • Bob | March 2, 2012 at 8:58 am |

    Amazing that all these schools are being pressured to change their Native American nicknames, but there’s a pro football team in the NATION’S CAPITAL called the REDSKINS! I’m sorry, but I do not find “Indians”, “Illini”, or “Fighting Sioux” to be derogatory. What about the Rochester Americans hockey team, should all Americans be offended? But “Redskins” is an outright slur. Didn’t ESPN just take a big hit for using the slur “Chink” in a headline re: Jeremy Lin? Time for the NFL to take their head out of the sand: “Redskins” is offensive and embarrassing.

    • a-rock | March 2, 2012 at 9:05 am |

      Oh, pretty much everything about the Redskins is offensive and embarrassing.

      • Brinke | March 2, 2012 at 6:58 pm |

        especially their owner.

    • Ricko | March 2, 2012 at 9:06 am |

      Remember in the early ’50s, upon discovering NFL football, was truly surprised such an apparently nasty nickname was used for a team in the nation’s capital.

      Me being a kid who grew up watching an endless stream of old Western movies on TV, I hardly saw “redskin” as a term of admiration.

      • Shawn S. | March 2, 2012 at 9:32 am |

        I thought UND had an agreement with the tribes to use the name like the Utes and the Seminoles do. agree with the redskins completely but if they have permission from the tribes why should the NCAA bother.

        are the Irish next?

        • D.Z. | March 2, 2012 at 10:02 am |

          IIRC there are two tribes in ND and one of them approved the name use and the other didn’t. Since they both did not approve, the NCAA is not allowing the use of the Fighting Sioux nickname. From what I understand, both Florida State University as well as Central Michigan University do have the blessings of the Seminole and Chippewa tribes to continue the use of those names so they are not being sanctioned by the NCAA.

        • Arr Scott | March 2, 2012 at 10:05 am |

          They reached agreements with one or several of the tribal governments, but could not reach an agreement with all of them.

          Part of the deal here is that North Dakota’s white community, both socially and acting through the state government, has not just a history, but an ongoing present practice of aggressive anti-Indian bigotry. A lot of people say “what’s the big deal about ‘Redskin,’ nobody uses that as a racial insult anymore,’ and they say this because they have never lived in the upper Midwest. Get a bunch of white sportsmen together in Wisconsin, Minnesota, or the Dakotas to protest against natives exercising their treaty rights to hunt or fish certain areas out of season, and you’ll hear “Redskin” used with exactly the meaning and intent as “Nigger.” I’ve personally witnessed this on several occasions.

          And if you read some of the legislative speeches by the Fighting-Sioux-at-all-costs radicals in the North Dakota statehouse, you’ll find some of the most open expressions of bigotry by elected officials anywhere in America at this time. In light of that, if I were a member of any tribal government, it wouldn’t matter what I personally thought about the use of the name Fighting Sioux. If anyone representing that culture and that government came to me asking permission for anything, my answer would be “No.” It could be a glass of water, it could be permission to use a nickname, it could be the right-of-way to build a road. Stop ginning up white against my my people, then come ask me for whatever it is I have that you want. Doesn’t work the other way around.

        • Chance Michaels | March 2, 2012 at 10:23 am |

          Exactly.

          This particular case can sidestep the whole “native names” thing; it’s a clear case of Intellectual Property.

          The NCAA allows native names as long as they can be licensed from the corresponding tribe. In this case there are two. UND failed to secure a license from both tribes, so they can’t use the name. Not a lot of gray area there.

    • Paul Lukas | March 2, 2012 at 9:18 am |

      I’m sorry, but I do not find “Indians”, “Illini”, or “Fighting Sioux” to be derogatory.

      It’s not about whether the names themselves are “derogatory”; it’s about whether a culture that stole a continent through a genocidal campaign of ethnic cleansing has any right to be appropriating the cleansed culture’s iconography. THAT’S what’s offensive — cherrypicking names and imagery from a people you more or less destroyed, and using that imagery to SELL STUFF. It’s vulgar.

      • Arr Scott | March 2, 2012 at 9:44 am |

        This. You know who should be called the Fighting Sioux? The team representing the four-year university we established for the Lakota peoples when we took their land and herded them into desolate concentration camps. Oh, right, we didn’t establish universities for them. Whoops! (And funny thing: When the Lakota established their own Oglala Lakota College, they chose the nickname Braveheart. Not Fighting Sioux with an Indian head logo. Imagine that.)

        Anyone else wants to use that name, they need to ask permission. From all Sioux tribal government. And if they don’t all grant permission, then tough. You respect that, and you find yourself another nickname for your teams, which after all are nothing more than grown adults playing children’s games for a hobby.

      • Ricko | March 2, 2012 at 9:45 am |

        Just to play devil’s advocate, if a team (in Alabama, say) opted to be the “Red Tails” to honor the Tuskegee Airmen, where would that fit into this discussion?

        (Not being contrary, honest. Just trying to figure it out, because intent, perception and reaction all definitely are involved when this subject comes up.)

        • Arr Scott | March 2, 2012 at 10:18 am |

          First: Why not ask permission from the Tuskeegee Airmen? Some are still alive, and they and their descendants have an organization. Simple rule: If you’re not willing to ask permission first, then your intentions aren’t actually honorable, are they?

          Second: The intent to honor would be pretty clear in such a case, even if permission were not asked. Everyone today regards those airmen as great heroes. The historical use of native names by white teams, conversely, dates to an era of widespread and legally enforced white supremacy. So it’s much less plausible to claim that “Fighting Sioux” or equivalents were meant to honor, rather than exploit or belittle.

          In light of the ubiquitous bigotry in the era when most of these native nicknames were adopted, we would need to see affirmative steps demonstrating rejection of exploitative bigotry, such as asking tribes for permission and permitting the admission of native students, before it would be reasonable to assume honorable intentions for any such name.

        • Ricko | March 2, 2012 at 10:53 am |

          More devil’s advocate.

          So we choose team names because we are belittling something or someone? Because we think they’re caricatures worthy of derision we minimize or marginalize them by naming our team after them? The idea is to make our team sound stupid and/or incompetent?

          Of course, the truth is that intent doesn’t matter diddly if the people involved will take offense…but the team “namers”—as misguided or insensitive as perhaps they may have been—don’t necessarily need to be taken to task for being evil or condescending. They likely thought they were doing someone an honor.

          But that doesn’t mean a name can’t be, or shouldn’t be, changed.

        • Arr Scott | March 2, 2012 at 12:27 pm |

          Ricko, I hear you, and I think we actually agree. Just to be clear that I’m speaking in-the-spirit-of-argument here. But. First off, it is naive to believe that every team nickname ever chosen was intended as an honor. Obvious examples: Pirates & Cubs. Those names were intentionally derogatory when first applied. (As was the earlier Cubs monicker Orphans – that wasn’t about saluting the nobility of orphans, it was about the team being a bunch of castoffs.) So we know that in point of actual fact, some team names were chosen with intent other than doing honor to the source of the name.

          Second, even in the event of good intentions, well, remind us again what the road to hell is paved with. A racial name used by practicing bigots must be assumed to be a reflection of the racial bigotry of the person who chooses the name. The white supremacy that was widely believed and legally enforced across the nation at the time was not such that it held that everything about all non-whites was without merit. Rather, it was an ideology that applied a twisted set of attributes, both vices and virtues, to all members of each race. Black people were mentally and socially inferior, of course, but their skill at physical labor and entertainment was unmatched even by the strongest, most talented white people, and that was to be respected. And so forth. So the supposed virtues that were intended to be honored by a native-related team name are likely to reflect racial bigotry, rather than true respect.

          This last is why the name “Redskins” is so obviously inappropriate. The guy who applied the name was one of the most notorious and unrepentant racial bigots in American business history. He was an active, practicing white supremacist for decades, including at least a decade after such attitudes and expressions came to be regarded as shameful by his own peers. If he intended earnest and actual honor to America’s first nations with the name, it would be the first and only time in his career he did such a thing without the taint of deliberate racial bigotry. Which is an absurd thing to believe. I’m confident he didn’t mean the name overtly to say “F you!” to American Indians. But a mind so twisted by the ideology of white supremacy simply cannot do actual honor in the use of racial terms even when honor is intended.

          It’s like, when a white racist tries to compliment a black person and begins with, “Some of my best friends are black, and …” what follows isn’t actually a compliment. It’s just a further expression of racism. Even if the speaker sincerely believes he’s speaking a compliment.

        • Ricko | March 2, 2012 at 12:43 pm |

          Yeah, we’re pretty much saying the same thing.

          As to “some of my best friends…”

          I know an awful lot of people who I swear, at a party or something, think things like, “Gee, I was hoping there’d be more black people here that I could be liberal with.”

      • The Jeff | March 2, 2012 at 9:52 am |

        How do you feel about San Diego State being the Aztecs? That one seems to be OK with the NCAA.

        They were a native culture that was wiped out by a campaign of genocide. It just happened to be a completely successful campaign, carried out by the Spanish a couple hundred years earlier.

        • Ricko | March 2, 2012 at 9:57 am |

          Well, it was, y’know, the Spanish…

        • a-rock | March 2, 2012 at 10:30 am |

          What about the Notre Dame? Do they have to ask permission from Ireland to be called Fighting Irish? And while America didn’t commit genocide against them, they were certainly discriminated against until fairly recently.

        • a-rock | March 2, 2012 at 10:31 am |

          Not sure why I just a called them “*the* Notre Dame”

        • a-rock | March 2, 2012 at 10:31 am |

          I’m going back to bed.

        • snowdan | March 2, 2012 at 11:37 am |

          Notre Dame has always had a high proportion of Irish people involved with the school who are very proud of the name. How many sioux people are actually involved at North Dakota? Methinks not too many.

        • DenverGregg | March 2, 2012 at 11:52 am |

          In ’79 I had a friend who attended UND who told me that there was an intramural team (hoops?) made up exclusively of Sioux who called themselves “The Fightin’ Norwegians”. We thought that was hilarious.

    • walter | March 2, 2012 at 11:10 am |

      The professional teams carrying Indian iconography have consistently taken a harder line against change than their college brethren. It probably has something to do with the equity of changing brand identity in a free market, but I’m not an expert. I used to exult in the rebel pride of teams that wouldn’t change, but I guess I’m mellowing out in my dotage. If the Cleveland Indians were my favorite team, I might use Chief Wahoo’s feather as a capital “I”, but you’re free to disagree.

    • walter | March 2, 2012 at 11:18 am |

      As far as Notre Dame is concerned, I don’t personally know a human of Irish extraction who isn’t *thrilled* about the “Fighting Irish” mascot. It has to do with the collective identity an ethnic group chooses for itself. It doesn’t take a genius to see Indians go out of their way to be seen as solemn, at the same time Irish make an effort to seem cheery. Hope this hurts nobody’s feelings; it’s a statement made from years of observation.

      • JTH | March 2, 2012 at 11:31 am |

        I’m (part) Irish and Catholic and I have this to say: Fuck Notre Dame.

        But I couldn’t care less about their nickname, mascot, logo, etc.

  • Ilana Hardesty | March 2, 2012 at 9:05 am |

    Hey Paul,
    Non uni, but I appreciated your ticker-bit about Feb 22. That is my Dad’s birthday. When the Monday Holiday thing happened, my grandmother was rumored to have said to my father, “Don’t you worry, Tommy, to me, your birthday will ALWAYS be on February 22.” We always got a kick out of that, and I think of it every Washington’s Birthday…

  • Randy Miller | March 2, 2012 at 9:08 am |

    I recall that it was not rare for basketball uniforms to place the front numerals off-center back in the ’60s and ’70s. I think a lot of the Southland Athletic jerseys used that design.

    • Andy | March 2, 2012 at 9:11 am |

      I don’t think it’s strange at all. Plenty of NBA teams have done this over the years. NCAA has a rule currently that numerals have to be centered, I believe, and you can only use the numerals 1-5, but apparently they weren’t as strict back then.

  • Andy | March 2, 2012 at 9:09 am |

    That infographic is dreadful. The whole basis of an infographic absolutely needs to be detailed, accurate research. Looking at it for about ten seconds, I found Derrick Rose misspelled ‘Derek Rose,’ and the Knicks jersey displayed with white numbers and orange trim, when it should be reversed to match the on-court garb. Details, baby.

    • Simply Moono | March 2, 2012 at 9:59 am |

      Plus, Lin doesn’t have a “Fanpage”, so over 700,000 people don’t “Like” him on Facebook, they’re “Subscribed” to his personal account. Just checked FB two hours ago, and that number almost doubled to well over 1.3 million.

  • JTM | March 2, 2012 at 9:12 am |

    Sterling basketballs are awful.

    • M.Princip | March 2, 2012 at 9:41 am |

      I was never much of a basketball player, never played on a team, although whenever messin’ around shootin’ hoops, I always preferred a ball with deeper grooves and a decent amount of tact when you sweat. That just seems like common sense, the same way most QBs use the laces to throw a better ball. Just by doing a visual comparison, I think I would prefer the Nike ball over the Sterling.

      • M.Princip | March 2, 2012 at 9:47 am |

        That’s tack, or grip; “…decent amount of tack…”

        • jdreyfuss | March 2, 2012 at 9:57 am |

          It doesn’t have to be. I enjoy polite sports equipment as much as anyone.

        • M.Princip | March 2, 2012 at 10:14 am |

          Bollocks!

  • Jared | March 2, 2012 at 9:21 am |

    That Catholic University warmup is just a ripoff of Indiana University.

    • JTH | March 2, 2012 at 11:27 am |

      Ripoff or homage?

      • Phil Hecken | March 2, 2012 at 1:30 pm |

        homage?

        hahahahahahahahaha

    • Christian | March 2, 2012 at 2:16 pm |

      Definitely an homage. The great Fran Murray, former equipment manager at CUA, was part of keeping the tradition of the candy-striped warm up pants. I think that CUA has been wearing them since the 70’s and the height of Indiana’s prominence.

      Nice to see the ol’ Duf on Uni-Watch

  • JAson | March 2, 2012 at 9:43 am |

    The fun part of the Jose Bautista video is seeing that he uses the claw grip- where you put your pinky & ring finger in the pinky slot.

    Also, the argument over the Indians nickname & Wahoo always comes up, and as a Cleveland fan, I have a dog in this fight but my biggest problem is that no one ever suggests a new nickname! I’ll just throw out the suggestion of a rename-the-Indians contest for weekend posts. Maybe the commUnity could come up with a good replacement nickname then we could have a design contest to go along with the new name? Any takers??

    • Arr Scott | March 2, 2012 at 9:54 am |

      Meant to post this on Leap Day, when the new MLB At Bat mobile app was released. In the various team-list menus within the app, almost all teams are represented by their primary cap logo. So the Orioles are represented by the cartoon bird head; the Blue Jays by the blue-jay head, the Marlins by the apostrofish M; the Cubs by a red circle-C (no “ubs”); and so forth. The only exceptions are:

      Cleveland – no Chief Wahoo; it’s the block C instead;

      Brewers – it’s the M on Wisconsin logo;

      Cardinals – the bird-on-bat cap logo instead of StL; and

      Diamondbacks – the alternate A logo replaces the primary snake-D logo.

      Something about the use of the block C for Cleveland instead of Chief Wahoo seems significant to me, as if it’s signalling a meaningful, if unstated, migration away from Chief Wahoo. Which I approve of on aesthetic grounds as much as on decency grounds; Cleveland’s block-lettering unis are simply superior in every way to the Chief Wahoo/script unis.

      • Chance Michaels | March 2, 2012 at 10:29 am |

        The A logo is the Diamondbacks’ primary; the snake-D is the alternate.

        I haven’t downloaded At Bat 12 yet, but what you describe is identical to At Bat 11, including the Indians.

        The only exception is the Orioles, who used their catastrophic logo last year. Glad to see that one gone for 2012.

        • Arr Scott | March 2, 2012 at 12:30 pm |

          But don’t the D-Backs wear the D-snake logo as their primary cap logo? That’s what I meant. But the use of the A as the primary team logo, even if it’s the alternate cap logo, would mean I was wrong to include Arizona on my list of anomalies.

        • Chance Michaels | March 2, 2012 at 12:52 pm |

          Oh, sorry. I misunderstood.

          Interesting that they should use such a mix of cap logos, primary logos and alternate logos. Especially Cleveland’s alternate.

        • Arr Scott | March 2, 2012 at 2:13 pm |

          That’s what jumped out at me: In all but a couple of cases, they use the team’s primary cap logo, not its logo logo. So the exceptions really stand out, particularly the lack of Chief Wahoo, since it’s the first exception that you see when scrolling down the list.

          In a few cases, the app’s list reverses the cap emblem’s colors; so it’s a red P on white for the Phillies. Which is good; the least attractive logo in the list is the Nats, which is a white W with a red outline on white. Too hard to see, compared to all the others.

      • Dumb Guy | March 2, 2012 at 10:34 am |

        “…when the new MLB At Bat mobile app was released.”

        I must still have some comic book geek blood in my veins. I read that as “MLB Batmobile” and got all excited.

    • Phil Hecken | March 2, 2012 at 1:31 pm |

      “I’ll just throw out the suggestion of a rename-the-Indians contest for weekend posts. Maybe the commUnity could come up with a good replacement nickname then we could have a design contest to go along with the new name? Any takers??”

      ~~~

      let me run it up the flagpole…see if anyone salutes

      • Connie | March 2, 2012 at 4:33 pm |

        Ten-hut!!

  • interlockingtc | March 2, 2012 at 9:47 am |

    The c. 1942 photo of the sanitation workers marching in Yankee Stadium is beautiful. Heartbreaking, dignified, surprising.

    Meanwhile, why is that this Cubs team photo, featuring the ivy and no advertising…

    http://shop.sportswo...

    …can’t compete with the 1908 Cubs team photo, which is rife with corporate advertising?….

    http://farm8.static....

    • Mark in Shiga | March 2, 2012 at 11:43 am |

      Because the 1908 photo is proportioned better. In the 2002 photo, the players are all bunched together in the middle, and are dominated by the empty bleacher seats and ivy above them. If you had them stand in a line like the 1908 players did, and had their bodies fill the frame of the photo a little better, it would look great.

      Alternatively, maybe the turn-of-the-last-century advertisements enhance the “period-ness” of the 1908 photo whereas the 2002 photo is timeless. Imagine the 2002 photo taken with 2002-era ads all over the place — it would look hideous.

  • TOMtiger | March 2, 2012 at 9:48 am |

    the 76’ers organization is awesome. wish i was in philly going to the game.

    i got a TAM hat at the grizzlies game the other day. but those were only for the 1st 5,000 ppl. to have something for the entire gate is impressive.

    wilt’s floor has got to be the greatest “at the gate” gift in the history of sports. let me know if i’m wrong.

  • Rob S | March 2, 2012 at 9:55 am |

    Sanitation workers? They look like an army of milkmen!

    • Paul Lukas | March 2, 2012 at 10:01 am |

      Agreed. It does seem odd that sanitation workers would wear white. Maybe they had “dress uniforms”? I’m just going by what the caption said…

      Gotta run to Long Island now. Have a good weekend, everyone!

  • Jason M (DC) | March 2, 2012 at 10:01 am |

    Not to get all political (but I guess I am), but I think Wolf needs to shut up about Washington’s birthday. Leave it as it is. We don’t need a federal holiday floating around Tue, Wed, Thu. And it’s not like advertising is ignoring him and opting to use Millard Fillmore and Grover Cleveland. Washington and Lincoln are by far the two presidents most used in America’s sales advertisements.

    • The Jeff | March 2, 2012 at 10:09 am |

      Uh, X-mas floats. Independence Day floats. What’s the difference?

      Oh, wah, you don’t get a guaranteed 3-day weekend. So? Plenty of people don’t get those regardless.

  • Chance Michaels | March 2, 2012 at 10:33 am |

    I really dislike the increasing use of airport codes as shorthand, but this one works for me, being actually at the airport.

    • interlockingtc | March 2, 2012 at 8:39 pm |

      I just think it’s a really cool looking scupture.

      A big letter, standing alone, popping out of a ditch along a freeway. Nice!

  • Jory | March 2, 2012 at 10:36 am |

    I grew up playing with Sterling basketballs and never knew they were more of a niche company.

    Then again, I did grow up in Wisconsin…

  • K.C. Watt | March 2, 2012 at 10:44 am |

    Shorter Paul Lukas:

    “Cutting up a piece of history? Yikes, how appalling. Cutting up a piece of history and sending it to me? YESSIR!!!!”

    Oh, and you have the strangest definition of “turquoise” I’ve ever seen.

    • Paul Lukas | March 2, 2012 at 10:54 am |

      Yeah, nobody else would ever call them turquoise:
      https://www.google.c...

      • JTH | March 2, 2012 at 11:09 am |

        Yeah, I can’t understand that, either.

        • Ricko | March 2, 2012 at 11:59 am |

          Is turquoise the new lime green?

        • Arr Scott | March 2, 2012 at 1:27 pm |

          Let’s hope it never comes to TFTS.

          Not that I’d complain; I love the color turquoise. It’s on the short list of colors I wish some team in big-league baseball would wear.

        • walter | March 2, 2012 at 1:38 pm |

          Too close to teal. In fact, to pro sports, turquoise/teal/aqua/aquamarine are synonyms. In college sports, however, it would be novel.

        • Arr Scott | March 2, 2012 at 4:31 pm |

          Nah. To earn the name turquoise, it’s gotta be a lot more saturated than any fabric color that goes by the name “teal.”

  • Chance Michaels | March 2, 2012 at 10:49 am |

    Love that Times article on athlete name changes. I don’t know why I didn’t know about Roger Maris – always thought this was one of those “so obscure they can’t even spell his name right” moments.

  • JTH | March 2, 2012 at 11:06 am |

    Pretty rad? Is that a another way of saying awfully familiar-looking?

    • Phil Hecken | March 2, 2012 at 1:34 pm |

      perhaps it’s an homage

      • JTH | March 2, 2012 at 2:13 pm |

        You know what they say about stealing vs. paying homage.

        Hacks pay homage. Geniuses steal. So I’ll give them the benefit of the doubt and say they stole it.

  • pushbutton | March 2, 2012 at 11:18 am |

    Love the Astrodome w/ grass photo. Have yet to see an Astrodome w/ dead grass photo; there must be some.

    • Simply Moono | March 2, 2012 at 1:22 pm |

      Maybe this? Probably not dead, but that’s all I could find.

      • pushbutton | March 2, 2012 at 4:07 pm |

        Thanks for that! I don’t know why, but I feel a tinge of nostalgia for the Astrodome. Odd because the only place my Cubs were slaughtered in more was Three Rivers….which I also miss!

  • JJD | March 2, 2012 at 11:56 am |

    Sterling Athletics has been one of my company’s customers for a long time. They do custom basket/volley/soccer balls and they also do uniforms. According to their website Cal Poly and Eastern Washington also use Sterling basketballs…with both coaches having started using them at smaller schools like Bo Ryan did.

    I’ve been to their warehouse several times and they had what seemed like a large variety of high school and smaller school uniforms that they supplied.

  • Coach C | March 2, 2012 at 1:46 pm |

    I love the content on the site, but the one thing I can’t stand is American-hating Americans. I don’t feel one bit of shame about what my ancestors did to make this country great. I don’t care one iota about people using the Native American nicknames.

    Paul, you hate patriotic displays and you hate on the heritage of your own country, there are 240 other countries in the world, don’t let the door hit you where the good Lord split you. The same goes for all self-hating Americans. You think you are cool making snide anti-american comments to endear yourself to Europeans.

    I am not some uneducated “redneck.” I boast degrees from the best co-educational preparatory school on the East Coast and a great Liberal Arts college as well. I played football at that Liberal Arts college.

    I am appalled by most of your stances, I only check this site for the content. You even hate Chick-Fil-A, what business is it of your’s what they do with their money? I am a self-made man, from a scholarship kid in prep school to reaching my own successes in life. What I do with my money is my business, not yours.

    You are probably a big “Occupy” guy. Have you ever actually talked to the so-called one-percenters? They were some of my best friends in prep school and still are to this day. You know what? When I was a poor prep school kid on scholarship, they helped me without me ever asking. Things would just be taken care of for me, without me ever having to ask. They are honestly the most generous, caring people I have ever encountered. Yet they are vilified because of their wealth.

    I would not have had the same opportunities in any other country, which is why self-hating Americans grind my gears more than any other kind of people. A poor boy from a small town made his dreams come true through hard work and tireless effort. Anyone can still reach the American dream, you just have to be willing to get up and work for it.

    The country you hate has allowed a son born to poor, hard working parents to earn opportunities that no other country would have offered him. The key word there is earned, I stepped up and earned my place in society, and everyone from similar backgrounds to mine can do the same. The key is to stop whining about how “it’s not fair” and start looking for opportunities to climb that ladder.

    Because I am White, I am hated.
    Because I am American, I am hated.
    Because I am a Christian, I am hated.
    Because I am Successful, I am hated.
    Because I am a Patriot, I am hated
    Because I am a Republican, I am hated.
    Because I am Pro-Life, I am hated.
    Because I am Opposed to Gay Marriage, I am hated.
    Because I am Hated, I know that I am Right.

    I will probably be banned for this comment, but, you know what, I forgive you Paul. I have always enjoyed the uniform news regardless of your political stances. You are good at what you do, and I can separate that from your politics, and I respect you as a professional, but not your Anti-American stances. May God Bless you Mr. Lukas and Uni Watch.

    Sincerely,
    – Coach C

    • Tim E. O'B | March 2, 2012 at 2:31 pm |

      First:

      A “self-made” man who admits that, “Things would just be taken care of for me, without me ever having to ask.” I want that kind of ‘pull myself up by my bootstraps and a crane on loan from C. Montgomery Burns’ type of independent spirit.

      There are no self-made men. It’s a myth. Read ‘Outliers’ by Malcolm Gladwell – it’s truly an excellent book.

      Second:

      “Because I am Hated, I know that I am Right.”

      So… Hitler was right, Stalin was right, Ryan Leaf was right, Sean Avery is right… when you use “poetry” to make a point, try not to use it so literally, it makes you look silly.

      If you really feel persecuted, you probably shouldn’t just believe your right since you’re hated. A lot of people are hated, some more deservedly than others.

      Thirdly:

      You’re a white, well-off, Christian, male American. You are the least persecuted person in the world. Ever. Shit the fuck up. How do I know this? Because I’m a white, well-off, Christian, male American and I thank my lucky stars I’ve never had to walk a mile in anyone else’s shoes, leave alone my own sister who faces social issues and subtle bigotry that I will never have to face based solely on my genitalia.

      Fourthly:

      Unless you’ve served in the armed forces, don’t you dare call yourself a patriot. I don’t care how many pictures of the fore fathers you have in your wallet, unless you’ve risked your life for our freedoms, shut the fuck up.

      Now, I won’t get into your political views because frankly I don’t care what they are and this isn’t the place for that, but the next time you come in here bearing the burden of your self-made cross, make sure it’s built out of wood rather than styrofoam.

      • Craig D | March 2, 2012 at 3:44 pm |

        Tim E. O’Brian = My guy! One more thing to tack on to this brilliant response. Since when does “I want my country to be better” = “I hate my country”? The Founding Padres wanted to establish a “more perfect union”. They understood the need for improving. Perfection will never be achieved, but the moment we stop striving for it, we fail at nation-ing.

        • Ricko | March 2, 2012 at 4:01 pm |

          Yes, indeed. Dissent, quite honestly, is in our genes.

          On the other hand, being a member of the majority doesn’t automatically make someone wrong. Or make them the oppressors.

          Coach C’s entitled to his opinion and, all in all, it was well and reasonably stated.

          Although I will say I’ve always appreciated the thought that it’s amazing how the people who want smaller government always seem to want it small enough to fit into everyone’s bedroom.

        • Arr Scott | March 2, 2012 at 5:59 pm |

          I am white – a white man, no less – and I do not find that I am hated.
          I am an American, and I do not find that I am hated. Even for the most part when I travel abroad.
          I am a Christian, and I do not find that I am hated.
          I am by any material standard successful, and I do not find that I am hated.
          I am a proud patriot, and I do not find that I am hated.

          From which facts I submit that if anyone is a successful, white, Christian, American patriot, and is hated, he is not hated because of being any of those things. Probably, he’s just a personally loathsome individual. Like ballplayers who wear pajama pants.

          The things Coach C – I assume the C stands either for “greatness” or “crybaby” – and I have in common are characteristics of the majority of people in the country. So, you know, empirical fact: Those things don’t make a person hated.

      • Arr Scott | March 2, 2012 at 6:09 pm |

        TEO’B, just a caution that your fourth point is noxious crap. Was Thomas Jefferson not a patriot? Was Ben Franklin not a patriot? Was James Madison not a patriot? Was Jesse Owens not a patriot? Are all gay Americans prior to 2011 not patriots? Was your own grandmother, or all the women legally barred from service in prior ages, not a patriot? The majority of the cops and firefighters are not veterans; are they not patriots?

        Military service and patriotism are two different phenomena. Nearly all who server are patriots (wasn’t that long ago, as recently as 1990 in my personal experience, when young men in trouble could be offered the choice by a judge between prison and enlisting, and those enlistments were not made out of a deep sense of patriotic fervor), but most Americans who do not serve are patriots as well.

        • Tim E. O'B | March 2, 2012 at 6:32 pm |

          Fair point, but most modern “patriots” are our armed forces, there aren’t too many people out there revolutionizing our country with a pen. But point taken.

          Oversimplification, my bad, but just being a rich proud American does not make one a ‘patriot’. Many people call themselves patriots when in fact they are only patriotic.

      • Brinke | March 2, 2012 at 6:59 pm |

        Ryan Leaf?
        (snorting milk out my nose)

        • Tim E. O'B | March 2, 2012 at 8:02 pm |

          well, everybody hated him…
          ;-)

      • Phil Hecken | March 2, 2012 at 7:19 pm |

        “Read ‘Outliers’ by Malcolm Gladwell – it’s truly an excellent book.”

        ~~~

        also “Tipping Point”

        and while we’re at it…make sure you read Freakonomics by Levitt & Dubner…that shit will knock your socks off

        • Tim E. O'B | March 2, 2012 at 8:03 pm |

          Love Malcolm Gladwell almost as much as I love Chuck Klosterman.

        • Phil Hecken | March 2, 2012 at 8:09 pm |

          sex, drugs & cocoa puffs

        • Tim E. O'B | March 2, 2012 at 8:11 pm |

          Killing Yourself To Live changed my life.

    • Tim E. O'B | March 2, 2012 at 2:41 pm |

      One final thought:

      Don’t try picking fights on these boards (and that’s exactly what you’re doing with that type of post) when Mom and Dad are away (Phil, you’re the mom – sorry).

      It takes no courage and proves that you’re just trolling. People on here like this website the way it is, and if you don’t like it let me paraphrase something someone once told me:

      “[T]here are [a lot of other websites] in the world, don’t let the door hit you where the good Lord split you.”

      • JTH | March 2, 2012 at 2:44 pm |
        • Tim E. O'B | March 2, 2012 at 2:47 pm |

          I thought about it but then I realized this troll was particularly weak and stupid. I’m done though.

        • Wheels | March 2, 2012 at 3:32 pm |

          The only thing Coach forgot to mention… “I didn’t blame anyone for the loss of my legs, some Chinaman took them from me in Korea but I went out and achieved anyway”

    • Paul Lukas | March 2, 2012 at 7:27 pm |

      Because I am Hated, I know that I am FAR Right.

      Fixed that for ya (with apologies to the guy who played the same rhetorical game with Goldwater 48 yrs ago).

      Despite what you may think, you know almost nothing about me. You have constructed a cartoon version of me in your imagination — a handy straw man to pillory. Be my guest — a vibrant imagination is a wonderful thing, and it’s always easier to have an imaginary argument with a caricature than with a real person. But your straw man bears very little resemblance to me.

      This thread can stop now — thanks.

      • Phil Hecken | March 2, 2012 at 10:23 pm |

        oh, c’mon

        in your heart, you know he might

  • Mike M | March 2, 2012 at 2:04 pm |

    I like the curling rock photo posted in the ticker.. The photo was taken in Thunder Bay. The Northwestern Ontario HOF is there as well..

    Here’s something else that people may like.. In front of Fort William Gardens is a curling rock.. I have the google street view..

    http://maps.google.c...

  • gak | March 2, 2012 at 3:22 pm |

    Thunder Bay’s my hometown, so it’s great to see that big curling rock. I found a huge picture of the outdoors of the Fort William Gardens with that big curling rock. (Fort William taken from one of the two towns that amalgamated into what is known as Thunder Bay in 1970; I’m from the other half, Port Arthur.)

    The Gardens is a source of strange tales involving a former mayor, who also caused a minor scandal by patting the Queen’s behind during a visit.

  • ACMESalesRep | March 2, 2012 at 3:35 pm |

    Correct me if I’m wrong, but didn’t ND State put themselves between a rock and a hard place on the “Fighting Sioux” thing? I seem to recall that a single major donor financed the new arena and threatened to withdraw his donation if the name were changed, then got literally thousands of instances of the Indian-head logo into the design to ensure that any effort to change it after the fact would be prohibitively expensive. The school accepted those conditions; now they get to deal with the fallout.

    • Teebz | March 2, 2012 at 5:02 pm |

      Engelstad Arena, funded entirely by Ralph Engelstad, does have that clause written into the agreement with UND Hockey using the facility.

      He said, “Tradition is the gentle fabric woven through time and experience which generates meaning, character, and identity to one and all. The Fighting Sioux logo, the Fighting Sioux uniforms, the aura of the Fighting Sioux tradition and the spirit of being a Fighting Sioux are of lasting value and immeasurable significance to our past, presence, and future.”

      However, Engelstad also was a firm believer in Hitler and the Nazis, so I’m not so sure that his word should be taken as gospel.

      It was a nice gesture to allow UND to rent the arena to have a world-class facility built solely for them, but to hold UND hostage over a name and logo that the governing body of the collegiate athletic sports has asked you to change is idiotic, especially when it means that no NCAA-sanctioned events can be hosted by UND or Engelstad Arena because of the logos.

      University sports-generated revenue speaks much louder than some letter from a billionaire who charges you rent.

    • Phil Hecken | March 2, 2012 at 5:11 pm |

      it’s the gift that keeps on giving

  • Steve D | March 2, 2012 at 5:27 pm |

    As much as I love Lin, they left off his most prolific stat…turnovers.

  • Mike | March 2, 2012 at 6:52 pm |

    Haha, cutting up the floor in “20,000” pieces for Wilt Chamberlain

    • Steve D | March 2, 2012 at 7:02 pm |

      Hmmm…they should have given one piece to every woman Wilt slept with instead.

      http://www.usefultri...

    • Paul Lukas | March 2, 2012 at 7:39 pm |

      [Forehead slap] I completely whiffed on that! Great call.

      Brings to mind one of my very favorite No Mas shirts:
      http://www.nomas-nyc...

      • JTH | March 2, 2012 at 8:25 pm |

        Hmmm… Yesterday, Pistol Pete’s warmup top gets praise. Today it’s the Lovers shirt. I guess there is room for a little purple in Paul’s life.

        And GOOD LORD, I hope the decision to cut it into 20,000 pieces was intentional.

  • Rydell | March 2, 2012 at 9:10 pm |

    Recently the Calgary Flames had an Al McInnis night and they wore their retro uniforms from when he played for them. Boy are those colors from that uni effective. Effective because when a flame is roaring there is no black! They also retired his number in the rafters, the mistake they made was retiring it with the colors they are using in their current uniform.