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Uni Watch Book Club: Milwaukee Braves — Heroes and Heartbreak

braves.jpg

The Milwaukee Braves represent an interesting chapter in MLB history. They existed for only 13 seasons before the team moved to Atlanta, but they won two National League pennants and one World Series title in that time. Their departure was a huge blow to Milwaukee, but the city couldn’t really complain since the team had come to Milwaukee from Boston to begin with. Their influence remained, however: When the Brewers volunteered to switch leagues in 1998, one reason was that Milwaukee still had a lot of old N.L. fans.

William Povletich’s new book, Milwaukee Braves: Heroes and Heartbreak, does a great job of telling the team’s story and capturing the interrelationship between the club, the city, and the fans. Seriously, it’s one of the better baseball books I’ve read, and it’s full of great visuals. Here’s a sampling:

This is supposedly the first team portrait ever taken of the Milwaukee Braves. As the caption notes, some of the players were still wearing their Boston caps.

• Before the Braves arrived, Milwaukee had a minor league team called the Brewers, which had cool ushers’ uniforms.

• Awesome spring training shot here. Note that one of the helmet logos is peeling off.

• Nowadays, reporters spot bottles of andro in players’ lockers. But in 1950s Milwaukee, the lockers were stocked with provisions of another sort.

• Looks like Miller was sponsoring (or at least inspiring) the locker nameplates, too.

• Speaking of beer, I was surprised to learn that Milwaukee fans were allowed to bring their own beer into the stadium. Or at least they were until 1961, when the local county board decided to ban carry-ins. After attendance dropped, the ban was lifted in June of ’62.

• The team’s front office personnel wore these team blazers — and the players wore something similar on road trips (see caption and left-side photo).

• The guy on the left has an interesting glove. Kinda looks like a Rawlings Trap-Eze model with an added strap across the top of the webbing. Never seen that before.

• Until I read this book, I hadn’t been aware that the Braves offered stock to the public (much like the Packers) in 1963.

• The book has a lot of great cartoons and illustrations (that last one shows the fight for the N.L. pennant, natch), many of them by Milwaukee Journal artist Al Rainovic, whose papers are archived at UW-Milwaukee — something for me to investigate on my next trip to the Cream City.

• The Packers played some of their home games in County Stadium, which led to September blackboard messages like this one.

• The book has lots of references to the Braves Booster Club. There’s something about that “in the bag” illo that I like.

• Wish I could’ve had a beer here.

Have I mentioned that I adore Milwaukee?

Uni Watch News Ticker: Interesting high school girls basketball uniform here. That comes from this 1972 yearbook. … If you skip ahead to the two-minute mark of this radio interview, you’ll hear some good info about how the Dallas Stars’ equipment staff handles player acquisitions while on a road trip. Good discussion about uni numbers too, which continues into this interview segment (with thanks to Dan Mugg). … The Erie Otters will be wearing St. Paddy’s-themed jerseys and dying the ice green for their game on March 15th (with thanks to Tony Kellogg). … The third question/answer of this interview finds supercross racer Kevin Windham discussing the New Orleans Saints-themed he may be wearing for this Saturday’s supercross race in the Big Easy (with thanks to Sean Clancy). … A little birdie tells me that the Canucks may have a new third jersey design next season. “They might drop the rink/stick logo and replace it with the Johnny Canuck full body shot on its third jersey,” he says. … Reprinted from yesterday’s comments: Terrell Owens will apparently wear his usual No. 81 for the Bills. … “My mother and I recently attended a Capitals game and were shopping for a jersey for my brother’s birthday,” writes Al Stone. “His favorite player is Mike Green, and we were prepared to plop down 200 bucks or whatever for an authentic, but they were sold out of Green jerseys. We were about to leave when the shop’s helpful sales staff said they could stitch any name and number onto a blank authentic, right there in the shop — except the stitcher said he’d run out of “E”s and “R”s. , He said he’d have the letters restocked by that weekend but, as a Baltimore native, I rarely go into D.C., so that wasn’t really an option. I found it funny that an E and an R are making me go shopping for another present for my brother.” Dude, DIY! … Good story here about the company that’s making the floors for the NCAA tourney (with thanks to Blain Fowler). … “Interesting situation in this video,” says Greg Riffenburgh. “The goalie is given a red card (expelled from the game) and a penalty kick is awarded to the opposing team. An outfield player had to step in as goalkeeper for the penalty kick and takes the original keeper’s jersey and gloves for the rest of the game. It creates an interesting image with the new keeper wearing someone else’s name on his back.” … Several readers have suggested that Michael Young may have been wearing blue stirrups over blue sanitaries on Tuesday (helpful annotation courtesy of Jason Greening). … I’ve been worrying about a certain something for months now, and it turns out Idon’t have to worry anymore. Phew. … If you skip ahead to the 2:34 mark of this video, you’ll see about eight seconds’ worth of Iowa wearing untucked basketball jerseys in 1987 (with thanks to Thomas Foote). … Michael Jaworski notes that Jay Bouwmeester’s name is so long, his nameplate is trespassing onto the red part of his jersey. … Very cool article here about USC’s championship rings (with thanks to Tyler Benner). … And speaking of rings, here’s what the Rays will get on April 14th (with thanks to Dwayne White). … Several special uniforms on tap for Virginia Tech baseball. “What I don’t get though is why they’re wearing camouflage for ‘First Responders Day,'” says Ben Park. “What first responder wears camo?” Excellent point, and a sad example of how anything crisis-related has been conflated with military action over the past eight years. … This commercial shows Kevin Garnett holding a UCLA jersey with a radially arched NOB, but UCLA’s real NOBs are straight (good spot by Erkki Corpuz). … Reprinted from last night’s comments: double-decker hyphenated NOB! … Interesting helmet-switcheroo story from Cliff Pate, who writes: “Our school, Huntsville (Alabama) High, hosted Tuscaloosa County High on Saturday and some of Tuscaloosa’s batting helmets were thrown out by the umps, presumably because they were cracked or did not have proper labels. We also heard it was because some were white and white is not allowed anymore, although that was news to us. Anyway, they had to borrow some of our helmets, which was a first for me.” … When yesterday’s ESPN column went up, there were 146 members in the DIY group on Facebook. There are now over 200, and counting. I think we’ll be seeing a lot of cool new projects in the future. … Man, that’s a lot of sneaker scribblings. Josh Williams got that shot of a Mississippi State player while sitting courtside at a recent Tennessee/MSU game. … Speaking of courtside seating, Travis Holland got upgraded to front-row seat behind the basket at last night’s Cavs/Suns game, and he couldn’t even enjoy the close proximity because he was so annoyed by the up-close sight of Mo Williams with his jersey tucked into his compression shorts. Additional photo here.

 

118 comments to Uni Watch Book Club: Milwaukee Braves — Heroes and Heartbreak

  • Peter Wunsch | March 13, 2009 at 8:56 am |

    “We’re willing, as we have said, to entertain corporate names on stations, but only for a fee,”

    Isn’t calling the stations Mets/Willets Point and Yankees/161 Street using corporate name? There is no Rangers/Knicks 34 St.

    If you can’t figure out when to get off the train on game day, you do not deserve to pay $100 seat , $10 a beer and $8 hot dog to watch a game.

  • Rick | March 13, 2009 at 9:00 am |

    Weird soccer uni switch: in last night’s UEFA-cup match between Ajax Amsterdam and Olympique Marseille, Marseille wore their away gold and Ajax their home white-and-red even though the game was played in Marseille.

    Anyone any idea why?

  • Kevin G. | March 13, 2009 at 9:02 am |

    I do not believe those Iowa basketball jerseys from 1987 were untucked. I am almost positive they had that strange piping on their shorts that made it only seem like they were untucked. I don’t know if that was their intention or not, but I believe they had normal tucked in jerseys. Can anyone else confirm this?

  • Robert in Dallas | March 13, 2009 at 9:02 am |

    I could never put my finger on it, but there was something so ultra-cool about the way the young Hank Aaron looked.

    http://www.thesportg...

  • Scott | March 13, 2009 at 9:06 am |

    Why don’t NYC subway officials just keep the stop named “SHEA” as a tribute to the old ballfield?

    Sheesh, some decisions are so easy. Don’t over-think it people.

  • Robert in Dallas | March 13, 2009 at 9:06 am |

    [quote comment=”318078″]I do not believe those Iowa basketball jerseys from 1987 were untucked. I am almost positive they had that strange piping on their shorts that made it only seem like they were untucked. I don’t know if that was their intention or not, but I believe they had normal tucked in jerseys. Can anyone else confirm this?[/quote]

    I don’t have any photos, but I remember the shorts having the weird design that made it look as if the shirts were untucked. In the video, if you look closely enough, you can see a shot or two in which the tops of the shorts are visible.

  • Scott | March 13, 2009 at 9:14 am |

    I remember those Iowa jerseys (after looking at that footage). It has an all-white wasteband and is not untucked.

    The kicker is the Hawkeye logo on the hip (at 2:40) … that would mean the logo was actually on the side/tail of the jersey (if it were truly untucked)? I think not.

    I do remember untucked Iowa uniforms sometime in the past … maybe it was the women’s team?

  • Bret the Jet | March 13, 2009 at 9:17 am |

    Baseball’s All-13 Team – Thirteen players who wore #13 in the Major leagues.

    Including Roberto Clemente, for a while in his rookie season.

  • rodm | March 13, 2009 at 9:23 am |

    Not 100% sure, but I believe the guy on the left with the strange glove for the Milwaukee Brewers is Frank Torre, the brother of Joe Torre. He was a first baseman for the Braves from 1956-60.

  • LI Phil | March 13, 2009 at 9:26 am |

    interestingly, i used to get booted out of shea when i tried this practice…stupid “TEAM”

    /my how times have changed

  • Paul Lukas | March 13, 2009 at 9:35 am |

    [quote comment=”318085″]interestingly, i used to get booted out of shea when i tried this practice…stupid “TEAM”

    /my how times have changed[/quote]

    Changing times have something to do with it, but don’t underestimate the unique relationship between Milwaukee and beer. Remember, a hefty percentage of the team’s fans actually worked in the city’s many breweries (Miller, Pabst, Blatz, and several more in those days). Beer was their birthright. According to the book, people were genuinely offended when the county board ruled that they could no longer bring their own suds — not because they couldn’t afford to buy beer at the park, but because it was always assumed that Milwaukeeans could bring beer with them pretty much anywhere they wanted to go in the city. It was just part of the culture (and, to a lesser extent, still is).

  • Juan Grande | March 13, 2009 at 9:36 am |

    The camo VT uniforms are ridiculous to start with. Cap that off with the fact that the old “chocolate chip” desert camouflage hasn’t been used in over 15 years. At least upgrade to the current stuff!

  • Dave Reding | March 13, 2009 at 9:40 am |

    I went to Iowa in the ’80s and can confirm the men did not wear untucked jerseys then (or ever AFAIK). Coach Tom Davis’s policy was to let the players design the uniforms, and what is seen in the video is simply the trim on the game pants. In a brief glimpse they look like the true untucked Marquette uni’s of the late ’70s, but they’re not.

  • Rick | March 13, 2009 at 9:44 am |

    Looks like the the helmet logos in the spring training shot are “raised” ala the cubs maybe. I cant tellis they are stitched logos though.

  • Lomion | March 13, 2009 at 9:44 am |

    Speaking of changing times, i love how the sign on the Milwaukee bar says “See you AFTER the game” instead of during. Guess the whole sportsbar thing hadn’t really caught on. Probably because you can’t bring a case of beer into a bar.

  • Peter | March 13, 2009 at 9:53 am |

    [quote comment=”318076″]
    If you can’t figure out when to get off the train on game day, you do not deserve to pay $100 seat , $10 a beer and $8 hot dog to watch a game.[/quote]

    -A fool and his money are soon parted…when do need to “deserving” to pay something…I think these Sports teams aren’t deserving on the $100 seats, $10 beers & $8 Hot Dog…

    I have forgone my MLB plans this year and will happily spend my money elsewhere that “deserves” it.

  • Namhob | March 13, 2009 at 9:58 am |

    [quote comment=”318076″]If you can’t figure out when to get off the train on game day, you do not deserve to pay $100 seat , $10 a beer and $8 hot dog to watch a game.[/quote]
    My only advise is to not ask how to get to Fenway Park whilst in Boston. The answer will change every time because if you ask, locals have decided that you are not worthy to make it to the game.

  • TBDRO | March 13, 2009 at 10:02 am |

    [quote comment=”318083″]Baseball’s All-13 Team – Thirteen players who wore #13 in the Major leagues.

    Including Roberto Clemente, for a while in his rookie season.[/quote]
    Anyone have pictures of Clemente wearing 13?

  • Josh J. | March 13, 2009 at 10:13 am |

    The glove in that pic has a type of pocket that is known as a “modified trap” web. I’ve got a 12.75in Nokona version with that same web.

  • Tim | March 13, 2009 at 10:18 am |

    RE: Mo Williams.

    He’s done that all year, I think he likes his jersey to fit very snug, like the SoD jerseys in college.

  • u2-horn | March 13, 2009 at 10:22 am |

    [quote comment=”318094″]The glove in that pic has a type of pocket that is known as a “modified trap” web. I’ve got a 12.75in Nokona version with that same web.[/quote]

    Modified Trap is what Nokona calls it. Rawlings calls it a Trap-Eze. But it still doesn’t have the strip of leather across the top like the one in the picture.

  • Robert in Dallas | March 13, 2009 at 10:23 am |

    [quote comment=”318086″][quote comment=”318085″]interestingly, i used to get booted out of shea when i tried this practice…stupid “TEAM”

    /my how times have changed[/quote]

    Changing times have something to do with it, but don’t underestimate the unique relationship between Milwaukee and beer. Remember, a hefty percentage of the team’s fans actually worked in the city’s many breweries (Miller, Pabst, Blatz, and several more in those days). Beer was their birthright. According to the book, people were genuinely offended when the county board ruled that they could no longer bring their own suds — not because they couldn’t afford to buy beer at the park, but because it was always assumed that Milwaukeeans could bring beer with them pretty much anywhere they wanted to go in the city. It was just part of the culture (and, to a lesser extent, still is).[/quote]

    A similar tradition exists in NASCAR, though for reasons unrelated to fans working in the beer industry. When Texas Motor Speedway opened and after it secured a license to sell beer onsite, the Speedway planned to prohibit fans from bringing their own beer to races.

    Inasmuch as NASCAR fans have a god-given right to bring suds to the track, there was a maelstrom of a protest after the new policy was announced. In short order, the Speedway changed its mind, and to this day, fans may bring their favorite malt beverages to enjoy while watching a race.

  • Beardface | March 13, 2009 at 10:24 am |

    [quote comment=”318087″]The camo VT uniforms are ridiculous to start with. Cap that off with the fact that the old “chocolate chip” desert camouflage hasn’t been used in over 15 years. At least upgrade to the current stuff![/quote]
    Can’t say I’m glad, as a Hokie, to see these. I mean, you’d think that a school that has its own Corps of Cadets would at least get the style of camo right. I mean hell, you see the friggen things on a weekly basis in class, because they’re required to wear fatigues on Tuesdays.

    Unbelievable

  • Mke Lipinski | March 13, 2009 at 10:27 am |

    That Rays ring is really nice…but not as nice as the rings the Phillies are getting!

  • Kek | March 13, 2009 at 10:33 am |

    [quote comment=”318097″][quote comment=”318086″][quote comment=”318085″]interestingly, i used to get booted out of shea when i tried this practice…stupid “TEAM”

    /my how times have changed[/quote]

    Changing times have something to do with it, but don’t underestimate the unique relationship between Milwaukee and beer. Remember, a hefty percentage of the team’s fans actually worked in the city’s many breweries (Miller, Pabst, Blatz, and several more in those days). Beer was their birthright. According to the book, people were genuinely offended when the county board ruled that they could no longer bring their own suds — not because they couldn’t afford to buy beer at the park, but because it was always assumed that Milwaukeeans could bring beer with them pretty much anywhere they wanted to go in the city. It was just part of the culture (and, to a lesser extent, still is).[/quote]

    A similar tradition exists in NASCAR, though for reasons unrelated to fans working in the beer industry. When Texas Motor Speedway opened and after it secured a license to sell beer onsite, the Speedway planned to prohibit fans from bringing their own beer to races.

    Inasmuch as NASCAR fans have a god-given right to bring suds to the track, there was a maelstrom of a protest after the new policy was announced. In short order, the Speedway changed its mind, and to this day, fans may bring their favorite malt beverages to enjoy while watching a race.[/quote]
    What about the Preakness at Pimlico in Baltimore? I attended this many times and part of the fun was bringing your own beer into the infield. (Despite my hands cramping up beyond belief my last year there).

    That being said, I’m sure the druken antics of the college kids helped them make that decision, but still a tradition lost.

  • Lwiedy | March 13, 2009 at 10:39 am |

    [quote comment=”318099″]That Rays ring is really nice…but not as nice as the rings the Phillies are getting![/quote]

    Probably not, league championship rings are usually toned down a bit for obvious reasons. I think the Rays (players) ring will look a little sharper than the one in the picture which according to the article, is a replica to be given away to fans.

  • Matthew Bohman | March 13, 2009 at 10:40 am |

    And it’s official, Owens gets 81.

    http://www.profootba...

    Namhob = Bohman backwards

  • oilfan | March 13, 2009 at 10:45 am |

    RE: The Canucks proposed third jersey change – it’s either happening or it isn’t. I thought the NHL had instituted a rule that an application to change the jersey is made a year out- in order to be able to unload the soon-to-be obsolete design

  • Tony In Erie | March 13, 2009 at 10:48 am |

    Jersey DIY, indeed….

    “Knitting” commercial. Watch to the end.

    BTW Paul, I was able to get off work on Sunday so I will be able to check out the Otters game and I’ll get pics of the green ice if I can. They’re sort of prissy about taking pictures inside the Tullio Arena. (Probably cuz they’re ashamed of it haha)

  • Mike Miller | March 13, 2009 at 10:49 am |

    [quote comment=”318097″][quote comment=”318086″][quote comment=”318085″]interestingly, i used to get booted out of shea when i tried this practice…stupid “TEAM”

    /my how times have changed[/quote]

    Changing times have something to do with it, but don’t underestimate the unique relationship between Milwaukee and beer. Remember, a hefty percentage of the team’s fans actually worked in the city’s many breweries (Miller, Pabst, Blatz, and several more in those days). Beer was their birthright. According to the book, people were genuinely offended when the county board ruled that they could no longer bring their own suds — not because they couldn’t afford to buy beer at the park, but because it was always assumed that Milwaukeeans could bring beer with them pretty much anywhere they wanted to go in the city. It was just part of the culture (and, to a lesser extent, still is).[/quote]

    A similar tradition exists in NASCAR, though for reasons unrelated to fans working in the beer industry. When Texas Motor Speedway opened and after it secured a license to sell beer onsite, the Speedway planned to prohibit fans from bringing their own beer to races.

    Inasmuch as NASCAR fans have a god-given right to bring suds to the track, there was a maelstrom of a protest after the new policy was announced. In short order, the Speedway changed its mind, and to this day, fans may bring their favorite malt beverages to enjoy while watching a race.[/quote]

    You still can bring coolers into Indianapolis Motor Speedway, as long as the cooler will fit under your seat and doesn’t have any glass bottles in it (only cans or plastic bottles), you can bring whatever you want.

  • Lwiedy | March 13, 2009 at 10:50 am |

    Jason Campbell looks good sporting the throwback but wouldn’t this be more appropriate?

  • Garrett | March 13, 2009 at 10:51 am |

    I work at the Milwaukee Athletic Club and one of our meeting rooms here is called the Milwaukee Braves room.

    Also, one of the more boisterous members of the club is no other than Johnny Logan, shortstop for the Braves from 1953 to 1961. He is also the President for the Milwaukee Braves Historical Society. I’ll see if I can get some more shots of the team.

  • u2-horn | March 13, 2009 at 10:55 am |

    [quote comment=”318096″][quote comment=”318094″]The glove in that pic has a type of pocket that is known as a “modified trap” web. I’ve got a 12.75in Nokona version with that same web.[/quote]

    Modified Trap is what Nokona calls it. Rawlings calls it a Trap-Eze. But it still doesn’t have the strip of leather across the top like the one in the picture.[/quote]

    my bad, it looks like Rawlings does in fact also have a “Modified Trap-eze” glove.

  • The Ol Goaler | March 13, 2009 at 10:56 am |

    Okay, I recognize Spahnnie and The Hammer in this photo, but who’s the third dude (wearing #28)?

    And while I’m well aware he played for the Braves, Red Schoendienst looks “out of uniform” in anything but the Birds on the Bat!

  • Josh J. | March 13, 2009 at 10:58 am |

    I think most baseball glove companies offer a trap or trap-eze, and a modified trap web. I believe Mizuno calls their modified trap web the “Ichiro web”.

  • Paul Lukas | March 13, 2009 at 11:01 am |

    [quote comment=”318109″]Okay, I recognize Spahnnie and The Hammer in this photo, but who’s the third dude (wearing #28)?[/quote]

    Hank’s brother, Tommie Aaron.

  • Teebz | March 13, 2009 at 11:03 am |

    [quote comment=”318103″]RE: The Canucks proposed third jersey change – it’s either happening or it isn’t. I thought the NHL had instituted a rule that an application to change the jersey is made a year out- in order to be able to unload the soon-to-be obsolete design[/quote]

    I’m with you, oilfan. I haven’t heard anything about a Canucks jersey change, and the league has had the new alternates for the next wave of teams on file for some time now.

    If anything, this would happen in 2010-11, not next season. The only way this could change would be if the Canucks are introducing an alternate next season, and haven’t told anyone yet.

  • LI Phil | March 13, 2009 at 11:14 am |

    [quote]The only way this could change would be if the Canucks are introducing an alternate next season, and haven’t told anyone yet.[/quote]

    well…yeah

  • DrBear | March 13, 2009 at 11:14 am |

    [quote comment=”318090″]Speaking of changing times, i love how the sign on the Milwaukee bar says “See you AFTER the game” instead of during. Guess the whole sportsbar thing hadn’t really caught on. Probably because you can’t bring a case of beer into a bar.[/quote]
    Actually, the reason was because there wasn’t any TV. Braves games (except for the World Series, of course) weren’t shown on Milwaukee TV until after 1960 – Lou Perini was against it. When the new owners took over, they turned on the camera and discovered Milwaukee had a limited TV market (lake Michigan to the east, Chicago to the south, Minneapolis to the west and Green Bay and lotsa woodland to the north.) That, along with being general a******s from Chicago, led them to move the Braves for big bucks. That’s why Brewers fans always save special hatred for the Cubs and White Sox (back in the AL days).

    As for the Miller name tags on the lockers, Fred Miller was one of the key people in getting a team in Milwaukee before his death in a plane crash in 1954. Miller was the Braves’ beer sponsor throughout their stay, and many in Milwaukee believe that if Fred Miller had been alive, he would have found a way to keep the team in town.

  • UmpLou | March 13, 2009 at 11:21 am |

    [quote comment=”318076″]“We’re willing, as we have said, to entertain corporate names on stations, but only for a fee,”

    Isn’t calling the stations Mets/Willets Point and Yankees/161 Street using corporate name? There is no Rangers/Knicks 34 St.

    If you can’t figure out when to get off the train on game day, you do not deserve to pay $100 seat , $10 a beer and $8 hot dog to watch a game.[/quote]

    If you ever wanted to know why railroad fans are called “foamers”, check this discussion thread on this subject out!

  • Kevin G. | March 13, 2009 at 11:29 am |

    [quote comment=”318114″][quote comment=”318090″]Speaking of changing times, i love how the sign on the Milwaukee bar says “See you AFTER the game” instead of during. Guess the whole sportsbar thing hadn’t really caught on. Probably because you can’t bring a case of beer into a bar.[/quote]
    Actually, the reason was because there wasn’t any TV. Braves games (except for the World Series, of course) weren’t shown on Milwaukee TV until after 1960 – Lou Perini was against it. When the new owners took over, they turned on the camera and discovered Milwaukee had a limited TV market (lake Michigan to the east, Chicago to the south, Minneapolis to the west and Green Bay and lotsa woodland to the north.) That, along with being general a******s from Chicago, led them to move the Braves for big bucks. That’s why Brewers fans always save special hatred for the Cubs and White Sox (back in the AL days).

    As for the Miller name tags on the lockers, Fred Miller was one of the key people in getting a team in Milwaukee before his death in a plane crash in 1954. Miller was the Braves’ beer sponsor throughout their stay, and many in Milwaukee believe that if Fred Miller had been alive, he would have found a way to keep the team in town.[/quote]
    Don’t forget that the White Sox actually played about 20 “home games” in Milwaukee during 1968 and 1969.

  • Adam Ok | March 13, 2009 at 11:30 am |

    The Milwaukee Braves never played at Borchert Field. That was the old minor league Brewer park

  • JF in DC | March 13, 2009 at 11:33 am |

    [/quote]
    What about the Preakness at Pimlico in Baltimore? I attended this many times and part of the fun was bringing your own beer into the infield. (Despite my hands cramping up beyond belief my last year there).
    [/quote]
    As late as 1985, we were allowed to bring beer into Memorial Stadium in Baltimore…it had to be in a plastic container though. We would empty a six pack into a big thermos…you had to drink it fast or it would go flat, of course.

    A friend of mine from St. Louis told me that until the early ’80s, you were allowed to bring mini-kegs into the bleacher area of Busch Stadium. Any St. Louis area old timers confirm?

  • Kevin G. | March 13, 2009 at 11:39 am |

    [quote comment=”318117″]The Milwaukee Braves never played at Borchert Field. That was the old minor league Brewer park[/quote]
    Yeah, I thought County Stadium was ready for them when they moved there in 1953.

  • colin | March 13, 2009 at 11:46 am |

    Fellow Milwaukeeans:

    I need your help. I am attempting to paint a replica of the old MECCA floor on a table, similar to what Tim Forster did (and can be seen in Paul’s latest ESPN article), but this time with the most beautiful, distinctive court in history. I can’t, however, any good pictures online. If you have anything out there that has accurate colors or shows details of the court, please share it. Thanks!

  • Ricko | March 13, 2009 at 11:47 am |

    Yes, it’s Frank Torre with the traz-eze style 1b mitt.

    As far as the Packers playing in Milwaukee. From the time I started following pro football in the late ’50s until at least into the ’80s the Packers split their home schedule evenly between Milwaukee and Green Bay.

    That’s largely why they were are able to stay the Green Bay Packers. Had they played only in Green Bay, NFL economics likely would have long ago forced them to move…probably in the ’60s and probably only as far as Milwaukee, but they couldn’t have lasted until now in Green Bay. What I’m saying is they wisely realized they were a statewide team and built on that. “Little Green Bay” hasn’t somehow miraculously held onto an NFL franchise all by itself.

    It isn’t as if Pottstown still had an NFL team.

    —Ricko

  • Anotherguy | March 13, 2009 at 11:58 am |

    HEY NOW!

    Check out comment # 67 yesterday.

    I tipped off the readers of this blog to the story about the subway station.

    It’s one thing to have a Chicagoan find the story about the NYC subway system instead of all the NYers here; but then to be blatently RIPPED OFF without any credit or citation… c’mon guys, show some class!

    :-)

  • Anotherguy | March 13, 2009 at 12:03 pm |

    BTW, the Chicago Blackhawks are using a sponsor logo on their lockerroom nameplates this year; first time I had seen that.

    Ricko: Packers split wasn’t “even”. I don’t know the ratio during the fourteen game-season years, but right now it’s 6-2: the old Milwaukee season ticket holders get two games at Lambeau. (I believe they also get an exhibition too-but that’s more of a hassle than anything else IMHO.)

  • CC | March 13, 2009 at 12:03 pm |

    My senior year in high school we wore the exact same uniforms as Iowa and they were not untucked. The piping went down the left side of the jersey and then continued on to the shorts and then split at the left hip going across the thighs meeting on the opposite hip. The logo was on the shorts just above the piping.

  • scott | March 13, 2009 at 12:06 pm |

    [quote comment=”318119″][quote comment=”318117″]The Milwaukee Braves never played at Borchert Field. That was the old minor league Brewer park[/quote]
    Yeah, I thought County Stadium was ready for them when they moved there in 1953.[/quote]

    I think that’s accurate, too. Borchert was only used for minor league baseball.

    As for bringing in coolers filled with beer, do any major league teams still allow that? When I went to Three Rivers in Pittsburgh the first time back in 1995, the team still allowed it, so long as the cooler would fit under the seat.

  • Squiddie | March 13, 2009 at 12:07 pm |
  • Anotherguy | March 13, 2009 at 12:11 pm |

    Yes, those Iowa uni’s were just a dumb style: but they were tucked in.

    The Iowans had a tendency to change uniforms annually for both football and basketball for a little while-and some of those football togs were butt-ugly.

  • Anotherguy | March 13, 2009 at 12:21 pm |

    [quote comment=”318126″]
    As for bringing in coolers filled with beer, do any major league teams still allow that? When I went to Three Rivers in Pittsburgh the first time back in 1995, the team still allowed it, so long as the cooler would fit under the seat.[/quote]

    I would be shocked if any stadium that sold beer allowed beer to be brought in. I’m suprised it went on as recently as 1995.

  • LI Phil | March 13, 2009 at 12:24 pm |

    [quote comment=”318123″]HEY NOW!

    Check out comment # 67 yesterday.

    I tipped off the readers of this blog to the story about the subway station.

    It’s one thing to have a Chicagoan find the story about the NYC subway system instead of all the NYers here; but then to be blatently RIPPED OFF without any credit or citation… c’mon guys, show some class!

    :-)[/quote]

    paul doesn’t give credited ticker mentions to folks with anonymous names & email addys…i’d recommend you send any stuff you’d like in the ticker directly to him ;)

  • duker | March 13, 2009 at 12:29 pm |

    You could bring your own beer to O’s games until 1985. The ban is what caused super-fan Wild Bill Hagy to boycott the team for several years. From his wikipedia page:

    “In 1985, Hagy boycotted Memorial Stadium for not being allowed to bring in his own beer. At the end of a game he tossed his cooler of beer onto the field…”

  • Tall Paul | March 13, 2009 at 12:33 pm |

    [quote comment=”318093″][quote comment=”318083″]Baseball’s All-13 Team – Thirteen players who wore #13 in the Major leagues.

    Including Roberto Clemente, for a while in his rookie season.[/quote]
    Anyone have pictures of Clemente wearing 13?[/quote]

    No actual pic yet…but this is the best I’ve found so far: http://www.americanm...

  • Al Gruwell | March 13, 2009 at 12:39 pm |

    Re: Comment #52. Iowa did NOT change football unis at the pace of the basketball team. They kept the same unis from 1977 (Hayden Fry’s first season, the Steelers style) until the Apex One disaster of the mid-90s. These were the “winged” jerseys that looked like peeled bananas. Then came the Reebok unis that had a few versions.
    Thankfully, Kirk Ferentz has restored the team to their “traditional” roots.
    Agree that the Iowa basketball team did change almost every season under Tom Davis. He did let players do uni designs. Also, the ’87 jerseys in question were not untucked. Iowa women did wear the Marquette jerseys.

  • anotherguy | March 13, 2009 at 1:02 pm |

    [quote]Iowa did NOT change football unis at the pace of the basketball team. They kept the same unis from 1977 (Hayden Fry’s first season, the Steelers style) until the Apex One disaster of the mid-90s. These were the “winged” jerseys that looked like peeled bananas.[/quote]

    The peeled bannana uni’s were the nadir, I’ll grant you that. But it seems to me that for a while they were changing them out year-by-year: and that seemed to be an ESPECIALLY dumb idea given that they got away from the Steeler look to start with.

    Here’s a shot of the white version: the black version was even worse IMHO.

    http://mbd.scout.com...

  • Jeff | March 13, 2009 at 1:05 pm |

    Paul writes: Looks like Miller was sponsoring (or at least inspiring) the locker nameplates, too.

    Likewise, the Brewers’ current M cap logo and uniform script are inspired by Miller Beer, still one of its major sponsors. Not a direct lift, but you don’t have to be a rocket scientist to see the similarities.

  • tom farley | March 13, 2009 at 1:12 pm |

    County Stadium was ready for the Braves; it was built in the hopes of luring a major-league team, and Braves owner Lou Perini took the bait.

    The book — which is quite well-written — points out that, because the NL approved the Braves’ move on March 18, the Braves had to try to accommodate the people who had bought tickets, in the new stadium, for the AA Brewers’ home opener. I suppose they didn’t have to, but the opted to, since these were their new customers.

    The Packers played one regular-season game in Milwaukee in 1933 as an experiment, then at least two every year from 1934 through 1994. They opted to play the 1939 NFL Championship Game in Milwaukee, because State Fair Park could hold more people than the first (Green Bay) City Stadium. The people of Green Bay were not amused.

  • anotherguy | March 13, 2009 at 1:17 pm |

    [quote comment=”318130″]paul doesn’t give credited ticker mentions to folks with anonymous names & email addys…i’d recommend you send any stuff you’d like in the ticker directly to him ;)[/quote]

    Kindly note the :-) in the original post.

    :-)

    I mention something contemperanously, and it goes over like the proverbial lead balloon: one day later the same item (now even more stale) generates all sorts of comments?? Where’s the justice, man? Where’s the payoff for the hard work? Hey lama: how about a little something, you know, for the effort?

    Watch out; The proletariat will be rising up to overthrow the bourgeoisie……

  • C.N | March 13, 2009 at 1:27 pm |

    Kentucky’s wearing black jerseys in their SEC tournament game — no “Keightley” on the back, like they wore during one regular season game, but actual players’ names.

    I don’t think I’ve ever seen these before — are they new?

  • Andy11 | March 13, 2009 at 1:30 pm |

    The book has lots of references to the Braves Booster Club. There’s something about that “in the bag” illo that I like.

    Maybe you like it because at first glance you think you’re looking at the front of the “brave”, but actually you’re looking at his back (he’s looking back over his left shoulder). Either that or his right hand has fingers that all bend the wrong way.

  • Jon | March 13, 2009 at 1:31 pm |

    Actually, the Browns wanted to move to Milwaukee after County Stadium was built, but the Braves vetoed it because Milwaukee was their minor league affiliate at the time. The Braves never played at Borchert Field. Borchert Field was located where I-43 runs by about Burleigh Street north of downtown.

  • anotherguy | March 13, 2009 at 1:32 pm |

    [quote comment=”318122″]That’s largely why they were are able to stay the Green Bay Packers. Had they played only in Green Bay, NFL economics likely would have long ago forced them to move…probably in the ’60s and probably only as far as Milwaukee, but they couldn’t have lasted until now in Green Bay. What I’m saying is they wisely realized they were a statewide team and built on that. “Little Green Bay” hasn’t somehow miraculously held onto an NFL franchise all by itself.

    It isn’t as if Pottstown still had an NFL team.

    —Ricko[/quote]

    As a Bears fan, I feel filthy writing something to defend Green Bay and the Packers. But IMHO their story is a bit more complex. The 1940’s or 1950’s stock issuance made them a “public” team in the most extreme sense of the word. You or I literally cannot buy one of those shares of stock: we may be able to inheirit one but that’s about it. And AFAIK the late 1990’s stock doesn’t have the same voting rights.

    IMHO, once their stadium was built in the mid-late 1950’s they were assured of being in GB. The salaries from then until the Rozelle-era revenue sharing were managable. I’d say Milwaukee was a nice add to revenue and marketing with an eye on the upcoming TV revolution-but IMHO it wasn’t crucial to survival.

    Okay, I’m off to take a shower now.

  • Bob W | March 13, 2009 at 1:34 pm |

    [quote comment=”318131″]You could bring your own beer to O’s games until 1985. The ban is what caused super-fan Wild Bill Hagy to boycott the team for several years. From his wikipedia page:

    “In 1985, Hagy boycotted Memorial Stadium for not being allowed to bring in his own beer. At the end of a game he tossed his cooler of beer onto the field…”[/quote]

    When I was in college in San Diego in the mid-80s, Jack Murphy Stadium used allow you to bring your own beer in, as long as it wasn’t in cans or bottles.

    FYI: A 12-pack of 11-ounce Lucky Lagers (about $3.50 then) juuuuuust fits into a well-rinsed 1-gallon milk jug.

  • shadoquad | March 13, 2009 at 1:38 pm |

    [quote comment=”318095″]RE: Mo Williams.

    He’s done that all year, I think he likes his jersey to fit very snug, like the SoD jerseys in college.[/quote]

    I know this is bad and pretty obscure, but when I read “RE: Mo Williams”, I immediately thought of Remo Williams. Ref: http://www.imdb.com/...

  • shadoquad | March 13, 2009 at 1:42 pm |

    [quote comment=”318100″]
    What about the Preakness at Pimlico in Baltimore? I attended this many times and part of the fun was bringing your own beer into the infield. (Despite my hands cramping up beyond belief my last year there).

    That being said, I’m sure the druken antics of the college kids helped them make that decision, but still a tradition lost.[/quote]

    What about the possibility of MD losing the preakness? I’m a little depressed about that, let alone the lack of BYOB. s

  • Kek | March 13, 2009 at 1:48 pm |

    [quote comment=”318145″][quote comment=”318100″]
    What about the Preakness at Pimlico in Baltimore? I attended this many times and part of the fun was bringing your own beer into the infield. (Despite my hands cramping up beyond belief my last year there).

    That being said, I’m sure the druken antics of the college kids helped them make that decision, but still a tradition lost.[/quote]

    What about the possibility of MD losing the preakness? I’m a little depressed about that, let alone the lack of BYOB. s[/quote]
    Yeah, that would be a loss. Although when I look at the shape Pimlico is in, the neighborhood it’s located, etc. Well, Moms always said if you don’t have something nice to say, don’t say anything at all! (Lord knows I’ve broken that rule in the past!!!!)

    I digress….

    I just think the powers-that-be would love to move the Preakness to a “better locale”.

    I don’t know how you do that though, part of the tradition of a stakes race, and a triple crown one at that, is the venue. For instance, Harness Racing has the Little Brown Jug which is raced each year in Delaware, Ohio at a fair. Sure they could do better at a place like the Big M but it wouldn’t be the same.

    What about slots in MD? That’s kept purses higher for racing in Delaware, West Virginia and more recently PA.

  • dgc | March 13, 2009 at 2:04 pm |

    [quote comment=\”318146\”]

    I just think the powers-that-be would love to move the Preakness to a \”better locale\”.

    I don\’t know how you do that though, part of the tradition of a stakes race, and a triple crown one at that, is the venue. For instance, Harness Racing has the Little Brown Jug which is raced each year in Delaware, Ohio at a fair. Sure they could do better at a place like the Big M but it wouldn\’t be the same.

    What about slots in MD? That\’s kept purses higher for racing in Delaware, West Virginia and more recently PA.[/quote]

    IIRC Magna is going rapidly toward bankruptcy, so they might not have a track to move the Preakness to.

    And the MD voters approved slots, but thanks to the economy and the General Assembly’s profit margin, slots aren’t arriving any time soon. For hilarity, read up on slots and the Laurel racetrack.

  • shadoquad | March 13, 2009 at 2:05 pm |

    [quote comment=”318146″][quote comment=”318145″][quote comment=”318100″]
    What about the Preakness at Pimlico in Baltimore? I attended this many times and part of the fun was bringing your own beer into the infield. (Despite my hands cramping up beyond belief my last year there).

    That being said, I’m sure the druken antics of the college kids helped them make that decision, but still a tradition lost.[/quote]

    What about the possibility of MD losing the preakness? I’m a little depressed about that, let alone the lack of BYOB. s[/quote]
    Yeah, that would be a loss. Although when I look at the shape Pimlico is in, the neighborhood it’s located, etc. Well, Moms always said if you don’t have something nice to say, don’t say anything at all! (Lord knows I’ve broken that rule in the past!!!!)

    I digress….

    I just think the powers-that-be would love to move the Preakness to a “better locale”.

    I don’t know how you do that though, part of the tradition of a stakes race, and a triple crown one at that, is the venue. For instance, Harness Racing has the Little Brown Jug which is raced each year in Delaware, Ohio at a fair. Sure they could do better at a place like the Big M but it wouldn’t be the same.

    What about slots in MD? That’s kept purses higher for racing in Delaware, West Virginia and more recently PA.[/quote]

    Without going too deeply into MD politics, Ehrlich’s original slots proposal during his administration placed them at horse tracks to protect the industry, but that failed at the time. O’Malley’s proposal still included tracks as a possibility and passed, but in recent weeks, Annapolis has decided against slots at MD tracks, and with Magna Entertainment Group facing hard times with no slots, it’s a shaky situation at best.

  • shadoquad | March 13, 2009 at 2:07 pm |

    [quote comment=”318147″][quote comment=\”318146\”]

    I just think the powers-that-be would love to move the Preakness to a \”better locale\”.

    I don\’t know how you do that though, part of the tradition of a stakes race, and a triple crown one at that, is the venue. For instance, Harness Racing has the Little Brown Jug which is raced each year in Delaware, Ohio at a fair. Sure they could do better at a place like the Big M but it wouldn\’t be the same.

    What about slots in MD? That\’s kept purses higher for racing in Delaware, West Virginia and more recently PA.[/quote]

    IIRC Magna is going rapidly toward bankruptcy, so they might not have a track to move the Preakness to.

    And the MD voters approved slots, but thanks to the economy and the General Assembly’s profit margin, slots aren’t arriving any time soon. For hilarity, read up on slots and the Laurel racetrack.[/quote]

    dgc said it better than me.

  • LI Phil | March 13, 2009 at 2:08 pm |

    [quote]Watch out; The proletariat will be rising up to overthrow the bourgeoisie…… [/quote]

    oh…there’ll be no money…but when you die, on your deathbed…you will receive total consciousness

  • Namhob | March 13, 2009 at 2:19 pm |

    [quote comment=”318150″][quote]Watch out; The proletariat will be rising up to overthrow the bourgeoisie…… [/quote]

    oh…there’ll be no money…but when you die, on your deathbed…you will receive total consciousness[/quote]
    Well, at he’s got THAT going for him…

  • Namhob | March 13, 2009 at 2:21 pm |

    [quote comment=”318151″][quote comment=”318150″][quote]Watch out; The proletariat will be rising up to overthrow the bourgeoisie…… [/quote]

    oh…there’ll be no money…but when you die, on your deathbed…you will receive total consciousness[/quote]
    Well, at least he’s got THAT going for him…[/quote]

    *fixed & TGIF!

  • Christopher | March 13, 2009 at 2:29 pm |

    I know there aren’t a lot of NASCAR fans here besides me, but its about the only sport where you can indeed bring your own beer to the live event.

    Its really the greatest thing. For one you can buy cheap. Secondly, you don’t have to settle for watered down Bud or Miller or what have you.

    As well, you don’t have to take 30 minutes off leaving your seat to wait in line (especially when the good seats are 50 rows up, with asiles every like 100 people!)

    It really makes it a great experience.

  • Maks | March 13, 2009 at 2:30 pm |

    that’s one big NOB! Kidd

  • anotherguy | March 13, 2009 at 2:37 pm |

    [quote comment=”318152″]Well, at least he’s got THAT going for him…[/quote]

    Which is nice.

  • MPowers1634 | March 13, 2009 at 2:42 pm |

    Lookie here…I found an awesome website for Tee-shirt enthusiasts as well as DIYers:

    http://www.mindlesst...

  • Dave | March 13, 2009 at 2:48 pm |

    Ricko is right. One of the biggest misperceptions of people nationally is that the Packers are simply Green Bay’s team. No, it is a state team, that’s why they have survived that long. Technically Green Bay is the smallest market in the NFL, but in reality there are many markets smaller (Jacksonville, Buffalo, etc) because the Packers are a state team. By putting games in Milwaukee for so many years it helped build a strong, statewide allegiance to the team.

    Also, more needs to be said about the Milwaukee Braves. I’d love to hear more about the team.

  • billso | March 13, 2009 at 2:56 pm |

    Those Braves pics were awesome. I lived in Milwaukee for a year back in the early 90s and got to see a Brewers game at County Stadium. Wotta dump… but I’m still glad I saw it.

  • Joe Barrie | March 13, 2009 at 2:59 pm |

    There may be no Knicks/Rangers 34th in NYC, but the Red Line in Chicago, which has a station near Wrigley Field called Addison has a stop south of there called Sox/35th at the White Sox park, the name of which I find painful to write.

    I note that the Braves picture, with the mixture of Bs and Ms on caps seems to have some jerseys with zippers and some with buttons.

  • u2-horn | March 13, 2009 at 3:20 pm |

    [quote comment=”318148″]

    Without going too deeply into MD politics, [/quote]

    All I really need to know about MD politics I learned from The Wire.

  • shadoquad | March 13, 2009 at 3:23 pm |

    [quote comment=”318161″][quote comment=”318148″]

    Without going too deeply into MD politics, [/quote]

    All I really need to know about MD politics I learned from The Wire.[/quote]

    Hahaha fair enough.

  • Paul Lukas | March 13, 2009 at 3:45 pm |

    [quote comment=”318117″]The Milwaukee Braves never played at Borchert Field. That was the old minor league Brewer park[/quote]

    Correct. I won’t go thru the several mistakes I made in order to arrive at that erroneous conclusion — let’s just say I fucked up.

    Now fixed.

  • Jeff | March 13, 2009 at 3:58 pm |

    [quote comment=\”318121\”]Fellow Milwaukeeans:

    I need your help. I am attempting to paint a replica of the old MECCA floor on a table, similar to what Tim Forster did (and can be seen in Paul’s latest ESPN article), but this time with the most beautiful, distinctive court in history. I can’t, however, any good pictures online. If you have anything out there that has accurate colors or shows details of the court, please share it. Thanks![/quote]

    My Uni Watch membership card has that floor it. Here’s the image I sent to help make the card. The image is closest to the real thing. The floor’s colors were bright. The card’s colors are too dark. (Not complaining, though.)

  • Jeff | March 13, 2009 at 4:03 pm |

    [quote comment=”318121″]Fellow Milwaukeeans:

    I need your help. I am attempting to paint a replica of the old MECCA floor on a table, similar to what Tim Forster did (and can be seen in Paul’s latest ESPN article), but this time with the most beautiful, distinctive court in history. I can’t, however, any good pictures online. If you have anything out there that has accurate colors or shows details of the court, please share it. Thanks![/quote]

    My Uni Watch membership card has that floor it. Here’s the image I sent to help make the card. The image is closest to the real thing. The floor’s colors were bright. The card’s colors are too dark. (Not complaining, though.)

  • BurghFan | March 13, 2009 at 4:18 pm |

    As for bringing in coolers filled with beer, do any major league teams still allow that? When I went to Three Rivers in Pittsburgh the first time back in 1995, the team still allowed it, so long as the cooler would fit under the seat.

    I don’t think they allowed alcohol in the coolers (which doesn’t mean it never got in).

    I’ve read that the Pirates didn’t sell beer in Forbes Field, but allowed fans to bring their own. Apparently, it wasn’t uncommon to buy a seat for the cooler.

  • Jon | March 13, 2009 at 4:33 pm |

    The Packers playing in County Stadium lasted about 20 years longer than it should have. They played in Milwaukee for very good reasons in the 50s and 60s. To make sure that the state\’s largest city was still Packer territory. But after Lombardi left, and games were on television anyway, the Packers should have just played everything up in Green Bay.

    County Stadium was a terrible football stadium. The sightlights were bad. Both teams had their benches on the same sideline. Lambeau Field OTOH has beautiful lines and is a great football location.

  • warren thompson | March 13, 2009 at 4:44 pm |

    [quote comment=”318115″][quote comment=”318076″]“We’re willing, as we have said, to entertain corporate names on stations, but only for a fee,”

    Isn’t calling the stations Mets/Willets Point and Yankees/161 Street using corporate name? There is no Rangers/Knicks 34 St.

    If you can’t figure out when to get off the train on game day, you do not deserve to pay $100 seat , $10 a beer and $8 hot dog to watch a game.[/quote]

    If you ever wanted to know why railroad fans are called “foamers”, check this discussion thread on this subject out![/quote]

    OK, but not all of us who like trains, the history, and the technology of railroads are “foamers” (i.e., we are not foaming-at-the-mouth idiots).

    We don’t count rivets on restored steam locomotives, we don’t stand on the tracks to take photographs, we don’t think we know more than the hard-working people who run and maintain the railroads — we merely sit back and enjoy steel wheels on steel rails..

  • rob | March 13, 2009 at 4:53 pm |

    Kentucky wore black uniforms today. I would say that I don’t like them but since I am a Gator and like our black ones, that would make me a hipocrite.

    http://espn.go.com/n...

  • Jeremy Brahm | March 13, 2009 at 5:13 pm |

    The A’s would allow you to bring a cooler in the 1990s for their games, but not the alcohol.

    I don’t know about now.

    In Seattle for the Mariners, they are pretty lenient, but no cooler or alcohol or water. But you can bring in a pizza (yes an actual large pizza), peanuts and other food as long as it can be quickly seen by security.

  • Alex Poterack | March 13, 2009 at 5:15 pm |

    “Beer was their birthright. According to the book, people were genuinely offended when the county board ruled that they could no longer bring their own suds — not because they couldn’t afford to buy beer at the park, but because it was always assumed that Milwaukeeans could bring beer with them pretty much anywhere they wanted to go in the city. It was just part of the culture (and, to a lesser extent, still is).”

    This is absolutely true. You can buy beer at the zoo in Milwaukee. I lived there till I was 10, then moved to Arizona. A few years ago, I read about the buying beer at the zoo thing, and only then realized that it seems weird. I mentioned it to my dad, and he had a similar reaction. “At first I thought, well, yeah, why wouldn’t you sell beer at the zoo?”

    Anyway, I’m glad this post came up, ’cause I was actually trying to find a Milwaukee Braves jersey for sale on the net last night, and was surprised to find it’s damn near impossible. To be clear, it’s easy to find ones like this, but I want a 50’s era one like this: this. Does anyone have any idea where I could find something like that, or even suggestions for how to approach it as a DIY project? That’d be greatly appreciated.

  • Anotherguy | March 13, 2009 at 5:18 pm |

    [quote comment=”318160″]There may be no Knicks/Rangers 34th in NYC, but the Red Line in Chicago, which has a station near Wrigley Field called Addison has a stop south of there called Sox/35th at the White Sox park…[/quote]
    I don’t know all the stops by heart-but if there’s a Sox reference on one but no Cubs reference on the other, perhaps one reason is the heavy taxpayer burden to support Comiskey. If Effin’ Blagojevich had gotten his way, we might be changing the name of that stop to Cubs/Addison.

    I rarely use the CTA for the Stadium; but personally I doubt that they have any UC signage posted.

  • Anotherguy | March 13, 2009 at 5:23 pm |

    [quote comment=”318172″]…You can buy beer at the zoo…[/quote]
    I know a few Milwaukee residents: I’m thinking that sooner or later, the ASPCA will be filing suit up there. :-)

  • Kevin G. | March 13, 2009 at 5:24 pm |

    [quote comment=”318168″]The Packers playing in County Stadium lasted about 20 years longer than it should have. They played in Milwaukee for very good reasons in the 50s and 60s. To make sure that the state\’s largest city was still Packer territory. But after Lombardi left, and games were on television anyway, the Packers should have just played everything up in Green Bay.

    County Stadium was a terrible football stadium. The sightlights were bad. Both teams had their benches on the same sideline. Lambeau Field OTOH has beautiful lines and is a great football location.[/quote]
    Can anyone tell me why both teams were on the same sideline when they played football games at County Stadium? I believe there was plenty of room to have a team on each sideline.

  • Anotherguy | March 13, 2009 at 5:26 pm |

    [quote comment=”318167″]I’ve read that the Pirates didn’t sell beer in Forbes Field, but allowed fans to bring their own. Apparently, it wasn’t uncommon to buy a seat for the cooler.[/quote]
    Several people at Soldier Field would happily buy a PSL for their cooler if they were given the opportunity. It would certainly save them money in the long run.

  • Anotherguy | March 13, 2009 at 5:30 pm |

    [quote comment=”318175″]Can anyone tell me why both teams were on the same sideline when they played football games at County Stadium? I believe there was plenty of room to have a team on each sideline.[/quote]
    Maybe the sightlines? AFAIK the benches at the Met were on the outfield side of the stadium, where fans could look over the benches.

    I’m not saying that is the answer; that’s merely a guess.

  • Alex Poterack | March 13, 2009 at 5:39 pm |

    I was under the impression that there wasn’t enough room, actually, and that’s why they did it. I can’t remember where I read that, though.

  • Alex Poterack | March 13, 2009 at 5:41 pm |

    Bah, still trying to get the hang of the tags here. I meant to post:

    Can anyone tell me why both teams were on the same sideline when they played football games at County Stadium? I believe there was plenty of room to have a team on each sideline.

    I was under the impression that there wasn’t enough room, actually, and that’s why they did it. I can’t remember where I read that, though.

  • LI Phil | March 13, 2009 at 6:02 pm |

    [quote]You can buy beer at the zoo in Milwaukee. I lived there till I was 10, then moved to Arizona.[/quote]

    the zoo or milwaukee?

    ;)

    (been a long damn week, pls. forgive me…but it’s quittin time)

  • Anotherguy | March 13, 2009 at 6:08 pm |

    [quote comment=”318179″]I was under the impression that there wasn’t enough room, actually, and that’s why they did it. I can’t remember where I read that, though.[/quote]

    No answer, but here’s some pictures:

    http://www.baseball-...

    Go to the 10-22-2007 post, the first football game at Milwaukee County.

    http://www.andrewcle...

    This site describes the “lopsided” stands, which seem to be shown in that picture.

    All in all, that early shot shows the benches on either side: so something changed by the time they no longer chose to put up temporary bleachers in left.

  • Anotherguy | March 13, 2009 at 6:11 pm |

    [quote comment=”318180″][quote]You can buy beer at the zoo in Milwaukee. I lived there till I was 10, [/quote]

    the zoo or milwaukee?

    ;)

    (been a long damn week, pls. forgive me…but it’s quittin time)[/quote]
    I was just going to ask him if they were really that leinent about the drinking age in Milwaukee: but your line is better. :-)

  • Squiddie | March 13, 2009 at 6:21 pm |

    The County Stadium entry in Stadiums of the NFL mentions that the teams had to be on the same sideline, but it doesn’t say why.

    Too close to the fans? League required space? I don’t know.

  • Kek | March 13, 2009 at 6:54 pm |

    What’s up everyone. I’m back in the hometown taking in my first Johnstown Chiefs game of the season. I already took one photo of something that’ll drive the logo creeps crazy. It’s even a bit much for me. I’ll take photos of anything else of interest but it might not be the best cause I only have my blackberry.

    Kind of disappointed in the crowd for a Friday night. Reminds me of the opening scene of Slap Shot.

    Oh well, still great to be back home.

  • Tom Farley | March 13, 2009 at 7:31 pm |

    The County Stadium entry in Stadiums of the NFL mentions that the teams had to be on the same sideline, but it doesn’t say why.

    Too close to the fans? League required space? I don’t know.
    Sightlines. People with seats in the first few rows along the west sideline — the baseball first-base line — couldn’t see the action on the field if there were player benches and players in front of them.

    Ricko, didn’t the Vikings have a similar setup at the Met, for the same reason?

  • Carl | March 13, 2009 at 7:34 pm |

    [quote comment=”318121″]Fellow Milwaukeeans:

    I need your help. I am attempting to paint a replica of the old MECCA floor on a table, similar to what Tim Forster did (and can be seen in Paul’s latest ESPN article), but this time with the most beautiful, distinctive court in history. I can’t, however, any good pictures online. If you have anything out there that has accurate colors or shows details of the court, please share it. Thanks![/quote]

    …I’ve been after this for year and now living in Minnesota I have a difficult time getting accurate photos of the MECCA (funny aside: the Gopher TV/radio announcers still call Marquette the Warriors). If you make any headway please post it – the floor was amazing!

    For all you Metsheads, would the transit authority ever consider leaving the Shea Stadium signs up? Somewhat of a tribute to the old gal? Similar to how the road heading into the Mall of America is Killebrew Dr (reference to Harmon and of course Met Stadium).

  • Carl | March 13, 2009 at 7:46 pm |

    [quote comment=”318166″]

    My Uni Watch membership card has that floor it. Here’s the image I sent to help make the card. The image is closest to the real thing. The floor’s colors were bright. The card’s colors are too dark. (Not complaining, though.)[/quote]

    shit. Should have kept reading. Beautiful card, by the way.

  • C.N. | March 13, 2009 at 7:57 pm |

    [quote comment=”318170″]Kentucky wore black uniforms today. I would say that I don’t like them but since I am a Gator and like our black ones, that would make me a hipocrite.

    http://espn.go.com/n...

    Already mentioned. Comment 62.

    Just sayin’. ;)

    What I still don’t know is why they wore them. I think it was the first time they wore them without Keightley’s NOB.

  • anotherguy | March 13, 2009 at 9:12 pm |

    [quote comment=”318185] Sightlines. People with seats in the first few rows along the west sideline — the baseball first-base line — couldn’t see the action on the field if there were player benches and players in front of them.

    Ricko, didn’t the Vikings have a similar setup at the Met, for the same reason?[/quote]
    I can’t comment on the reason, but the Vikes did use the same-side benches at the Met.

  • quezstyle | March 13, 2009 at 10:19 pm |

    Does anyone else see the weird design on the back of Duke’s jerseys in this game?

  • LI Phil | March 14, 2009 at 12:10 am |

    [quote comment=”318190″]Does anyone else see the weird design on the back of Duke’s jerseys in this game?[/quote]

    oh yeah…’shrooms are definitely kickin’ in now

  • Jeff | March 14, 2009 at 1:39 am |

    [quote comment=”318166″][quote comment=”318121″]Fellow Milwaukeeans:

    I need your help. I am attempting to paint a replica of the old MECCA floor on a table, similar to what Tim Forster did (and can be seen in Paul’s latest ESPN article), but this time with the most beautiful, distinctive court in history. I can’t, however, any good pictures online. If you have anything out there that has accurate colors or shows details of the court, please share it. Thanks![/quote]

    My Uni Watch membership card has that floor it. Here’s the image I sent to help make the card. The image is closest to the real thing. The floor’s colors were bright. The card’s colors are too dark. (Not complaining, though.)[/quote]

    I goobered up the HTML. The link to the card is the sample image and vice versa. I shouldn’t try to work and comment at the same time.

  • colin | March 14, 2009 at 2:00 am |

    thanks for the image of your card, which is great obviously. Paul had already sent it to me, and I also found your card somewhere online via google searching. What I am really hoping for are photos that show the bright colors that your card has unfortunately darkened. I mean I will be using your card as a template, but I was just hoping to be able to color match as well as possible.

    thanks again though!

  • Dave | March 14, 2009 at 1:31 pm |

    Hey Paul, I live in Milwaukee. You should hold a Uni Watch party here sometime.

  • David F. | March 15, 2009 at 12:00 am |

    [quote comment=”318172″]“Beer was their birthright. According to the book, people were genuinely offended when the county board ruled that they could no longer bring their own suds — not because they couldn’t afford to buy beer at the park, but because it was always assumed that Milwaukeeans could bring beer with them pretty much anywhere they wanted to go in the city. It was just part of the culture (and, to a lesser extent, still is).”

    This is absolutely true. You can buy beer at the zoo in Milwaukee. I lived there till I was 10, then moved to Arizona. A few years ago, I read about the buying beer at the zoo thing, and only then realized that it seems weird. I mentioned it to my dad, and he had a similar reaction. “At first I thought, well, yeah, why wouldn’t you sell beer at the zoo?”

    Anyway, I’m glad this post came up, ’cause I was actually trying to find a Milwaukee Braves jersey for sale on the net last night, and was surprised to find it’s damn near impossible. To be clear, it’s easy to find ones like this, but I want a 50’s era one like this: this. Does anyone have any idea where I could find something like that, or even suggestions for how to approach it as a DIY project? That’d be greatly appreciated.[/quote]

    Alex –
    Milwaukee native and DIY’er here. I’ve created alot of Milwaukee-related jerseys, etc…I’ve attached a slideshow if you ‘re looking for help.

    http://s651.photobuc...

    David F.

  • Alex Poterack | March 15, 2009 at 12:22 am |

    David F.-

    Dude, awesome work. How did you do the Braves one? Is it just a matter of cutting it all out of felt and stitching it together, or could you find patches somewhere. The tomahawk looks like it would be kind of tough…

  • Ant | March 16, 2009 at 2:06 pm |

    Great updates – love the site and your work.

    However, “close proximity” (used in the last ticker item) is redundant. The sentence should read: “…he couldn’t even enjoy the proximity…”

    Shocking error coming from the leader of the misused apostrophe crusade. :o)