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And We Didn't See Groundskeeper Willie Even Once

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Travel-wise, I’m deep but not wide. On the one hand, I’ve traveled in every U.S. state except Hawaii, which is more than most Americans can say, and have written fairly extensively about those journeys. But I’m pitifully weak on foreign travel. Yes, I’ve been to New Zealand twice, which always impresses people (I’m convinced it’s because the “Z” makes it sound more exotic), but I’ve never been to South or Central America, the Caribbean, Asia, Africa, or even Mexico. And until last week, my entire European experience consisted of a long weekend spent in London five years ago.

So when my friend and neighbor Amy Fritch recently booked a weeklong trip to Scotland and then asked if I wanted to come along, I jumped at the chance. We arrived Edinburgh on Sunday the 23rd and flew home a week later. In between, we drove about 700 miles in a big, clockwise loop around the Southern Highlands. Here are the highlights, organized by category:

Haggis: Let’s put it this way: I didn’t go all the way to Scotland to not eat haggis. But haggis is sort of legendarily nasty, so I didn’t really expect to like it that much. Now that I’ve tried it, however (that’s the haggis in the center, flanked by the traditional accompaniments of neeps and tatties — mashed turnips and mashed potatoes), I frankly don’t understand its bad reputation. It’s basically just a lot of oats mixed with a lot of random lamb-y bits — what’s not to like? Reminded me of a cross between goetta (the oat-centric German-style breakfast sausage that’s popular in Cincinnati) and kasha, both of which I love, so it’s no surprise that I really enjoyed haggis too. I’m keen to try making it myself, but that’s gonna be tricky, because sheep lungs — a crucial ingredient — aren’t approved for human consumption here in the States. Bugger.

Seafood: Langoustines — delicious critters halfway between crayfish and lobster — are native to Scotland but don’t travel well, so it’s almost impossible to find fresh live ones in America, and even the frozen ones cost a fortune. My plan all along was to eat them whenever they showed up on a Scottish menu, which turned out to be twice. They were everything I’d hoped for, and justified the whole trip right there.

We also ate scallops (tasty but not well seared, which I’m told is because Scots tend to cook by putting the food in a cold skillet instead of heating the skillet first); cullen skink (an excellent soup full of smoked haddock and potatoes); Arbroath smokies (superb wood-smoked haddock); mussels (a good option on any continent); fried prawns (ditto); some very nice salmon; a superb seafood bisque; a wonderful mixed seafood plate of hake, monkfish, squid, and some other stuff I can’t recall; and, of course, fish and chips (not bad, but not appreciably better than what I’ve had in New York). Oh, and Amy had kippers for breakfast one morning, but I just couldn’t eat fish to start the day. All in all, you could eat very well in Scotland simply by sticking to seafood. But then you’d miss out on the haggis.

Shortbread: It was everywhere. Every room we stayed in had a few complimentary packets of it, every shop had big displays of it, etc. Of course, shortbread is basically a butter delivery device, so I gobbled up tons of the stuff. But none of it was as good as the homemade shortbread Amy had made for my birthday a few months back.

The full Scottish breakfast: If you’re staying at a Scottish B&B or guesthouse, it’s basically a rule that they offer you a “breakfast” consisting of eggs, bacon, toast, mushrooms, tomatoes, hash browns, potato scones, black pudding (i.e., blood sausage), haggis, porridge, baked beans, oat cakes, and probably another thing or two I’m forgetting. Does anyone in Scotland besides tourists actually start the day this way? It was fun the first morning of the trip, but then I needed a serious nap right afterward. I mostly stuck to cereal after that.

Food that wasn’t haggis, seafood, shortbread, or breakfast: At various points I ate wood pigeon (excellent); a mixed plate of lamb loin, lamb shoulder, and braised lamb heart (good but not life-altering); Guinness-braised beef pie (a Scottish staple that I found consistently lackluster); a spectacular salad of green apple, bacon, black pudding, parmesan, greens, and a fried quail egg (my favorite dish of the entire trip); and stovies (a splendid stew of meat, potatoes, and onions, prepared for us by the very wonderful Lindsay Hutton [of The Next Big Thing fame, don’tcha know]).

Oh, and we quite liked tablet, which is sort of a toffee-ish dry fudge, a bit like maple candy with a more toasted flavor. It’s traditionally served with coffee, but I’d happily eat it anytime, and I’m already regretting not having brought some back with me.

Whisky: I don’t actually enjoy drinking Scotch, or any other whisk(e)y, but I know a fair amount about it and always enjoy learning more. Yes, I know that’s weird. Anyway, we visited the Talisker distillery (no tours were available, so we just checked out the visitors’ center) and took the tour at Glenfiddich, which was similar to the distillery tours I’ve taken in Kentucky. I’d hoped to see them drying their malt over a peat fire, which is the one thing that really sets Scotch apart from other whiskys, but it turns out they do their malting off-site. Bollocks.

Our best whisky-related stop turned out to be at the Speyside Cooperage, where we saw coopers busily reconditioning and restoring casks that will eventually be used by various distilleries to age their whisky. Pretty fascinating stuff, in large part because coopering hasn’t changed much over the centuries, as you can see here:

Beer: Beer drinkers won’t go thirsty in Scotland. Amy got hooked on Tenant’s, a light Scottish lager, while I just kept asking for whatever dark ale was available on cask. Had many good ones but don’t recall any of the names.

Accommodations: It wasn’t high tourist season yet, so we didn’t need any reservations and were able to find lodging as we went. Virtually every Scottish town seems to have an assortment of B&B’s and guesthouses (which are basically smaller, slightly less expensive B&B’s). They were generally fine — most of them even had free WiFi — but there were points when I found myself yearning for a cheap motel, a concept that apparently hasn’t made it to the UK side of the pond.

One place we stayed in deserves special mention: the Anderson, an inn in Fortrose (slightly north of Inverness). Really wonderful place — groovy old building, great rooms, excellent food, and two gorgeous bars. Highly recommended.

Weather: May in Scotland is like April in New York — cool in the day, cold at night, and consistently rainy. Or at least that’s how it’s supposed to be. But we had almost nothing but sunny, relatively warm days (highs were mostly in the 60s, and a few days topped 70). It did rain a few times, but mostly at night or while we were inside a building. Oh, and there was this weird moment when we were briefly pelted by hail:

Mostly, though, the jacket and sweaters I brought along went unworn. And the sunny days were even better because Scotland is so far north that daylight in late May lasts until nearly 10pm (believe it or not, this photo was taken around 9:15). Amazing!

Driving: The whole “wrong side of the road” thing is mildly disconcerting, but I’d done it before in New Zealand, so I knew what to expect. There are lots of small quirks to Scottish driving and highway signage, which I’ll save for another day, but for the most part we found the roadway culture to be pretty straightforward. Seriously, though, would it kill these people to have two cross streets meet in a simple intersection instead of one of those fecking roundabouts?

Retail signage: An utter wasteland. It’s one thing to have your entire country be devoid of neon; it’s another to evince virtually zero signmaking or design skills whatsoever. Even restaurants and pubs that turned out to be good on the inside looked sadly nondescript from the street, and there were only two occasions on the entire trip when I pointed and said, “Whoa, cool sign!” Disappointing.

Landscape: Then again, who needs signage when your entire country looks like a highlight reel of nature’s greatest hits? I had read that virtually any drive in Scotland turns out to be the scenic route, and it’s true. Every bend and twist of the roadway seemed to give way to another jaw-dropping vista (cliffs, meadows, hills, pastures, lochs, plateaus, mountains, waterfalls, etc.), and we quickly ran out of ways to express, “That is SO awesome!” I’ve been in one place that’s more beautiful (Glacier National Park) and taken two sustained drives that are at least as spectacular (down the Oregon and California coasts), but those are all localized, specific trips, whereas this journey covered a wide swath of landscapes and terrains, all of which were equally wonderful. Very, very impressive.

Livestock: Sheep were omnipresent, and pretty damn cute in that endearingly awkward way of theirs. This being spring, many of the ewes had young lambs tagging along behind them. Mostly they all just munched away in their pastures, but every now and then we’d see a few that had gotten loose along the roadway, like this group we encountered on the Isle of Skye:

We also saw lots of dairy cows, along with one small group of magnificent Highland cattle. Mostly, though, it was all about the sheep.

Crops: If you drive around almost any rural part of America east of the Rockies, you’ll see fields and fields of corn. The Scottish equivalent of this is rapeseed, which is used to make canola oil — it’s everywhere. But rapeseed doesn’t look like a typical planted crop — it looks like a flower. So you’ll be driving along and you’ll see these huge emerald fields of green grass overlaid with the yellow rapeseed. Nice!

• Bagpipes: Yes, there are actually people playing them, but only for formal occasions and/or to amuse the tourists. Basically, it’s reached the level of shtick, and most Scots I spoke to sounded like they’d be happy if they never heard the bloody things again. Which means they shouldn’t watch this little video I shot of a guy who was playing during a wedding procession:

• Kilts: Kilts, on the other hand, appear to be more than just shtick. We were told that most Scottish men have at least one of them (indeed, most of the men in that wedding procession were wearing them), and lots of them were featured in shop windows. Naturally, I’m mostly interested in the socks.

Castles: You can barely spit in Scotland without hitting a castle. Of the three we visited, Stirling was okay, Edinburgh was better, and Dunnottar was fairly mind-blowing, mainly because it’s situated on a wind-blown cliff and pretty much in ruins. No words of mine can do justice to this place, so I’ll just point you toward these photos and add that I later hiked down to the beach below the castle and saw a seal swimming in the North Sea.

Other attractions: We went for a swell hour-long walk around the Hermitage, which is just outside Birnham (a notable locale if, like myself, you’re a fan of Macbeth), along with a few other stops. Plus the countryside was so magnificent that just driving from here to there was pretty compelling.

But one stop stood out: the House of Automata. It’s basically a workshop where Michael and Maria Start repair and restore 19th- and early 20th-century automata (mechanized figures driven by springs and gears), plus it doubles as a de facto automata museum that can be visited by appointment.

The workshop is situated in remote nook of a secluded estate, and just finding it was a bit of an odyssey (Michael’s directions, which he had e-mailed to me about week earlier, included notes like, “Turn right at the triangle of grass”). By the time we found the place, it felt like we’d gone far, far off the grid.

Just as well, because the next 90 minutes were like a trip to another world. I’m working to create a highlight reel of the various video segments I shot during our visit, but for now take a look at the two short clips shown below and you’ll start to get the idea:

Harbours: We stayed in several small harbour and marina towns — one on the west coast, two on the east — a couple of which had an odd sight: The low tide appeared to be so low that several boats had ended up beached (additional photos here). I thought to myself, “Hmm, I guess they’ll be floating again when the tide comes in tomorrow morning,” but that wasn’t the case — the boats were apparently perma-beached. I meant to ask someone about this but forgot to do so. Odd.

People: Unfailingly friendly, and their accent sounds like music. Count me as a fan.

Pets: Everyone in Scotland is apparently required by law to own at least one dog. You see them in every town, out for walkies with their owners, most of whom didn’t seem to mind when I wandered over to give their pooches a friendly scritch. Oddly, though, we only saw one Scottie.

Shopping: Barely did any, although I did score this regimental striped scarf at a vintage shop. Cool.

Sports: We had planned to see rugby, but it didn’t work out, and nothing else was taking place. So the closest we came to a sports experience was staying up late one night to watch a Mets/Phils game on my laptop (first pitch was a little past midnight Scotland time). Made it through six innings before we conked out.

Loch Ness: Look, it’s just another lake. Except unlike all the other lakes, it’s surrounded by mobs of idiot tourists and kitsch vendors. We made a point of avoiding it.

Irony: I kept reading in guidebooks that the Scots have an ironic sense of humor. Didn’t really see much evidence of it, but I tried to play along.

The UK’s biggest Chicago Bears fan: My original itinerary called for an eight-hour layover in London on my way home, so Uni Watch reader Ben Isaacs, who’s an editor at Time Out London, generously volunteered to show me a cracking good afternoon of city highlights. Unfortunately, a series of airline and subway snafus left that plan in tatters, but I still had time to meet Ben for a quick beer before having to dash back to Heathrow. Thanks again for the swell time, Ben — you’re aces.

As for Uni Watch, I promised myself not to look at the site even once while I was away, and I was able to keep that promise. So before I give you some actual uni-related content today, let’s have three cheers — hell, make it twenty-three cheers — for Mr. L.I. Phil Hecken, who made it possible for me to enjoy all the above-outlined adventures without having to worry about my beloved web site. Can’t even begin to thank you enough, big guy — you’re the best. Now please, take a vacation of your own, because you’ve earned it.

Uni Watch News Ticker: I haven’t yet caught up with all the info Phil published while I was away in the land of the moors and the peat bogs, so forgive me if any of the following was already covered last week. … Lots of continuing controversy about the World Cup soccer ball. … Another day, another amazing Portland Beavers photo from Dave Eskenazi, this time from 1940. Look closely at the pant legs on the guys in the front row and you can see some of those back stripes that we first saw a few weeks ago. Also, look again and you’ll see that most of the players appear to be wearing men’s dress shoes, not cleats. … Speaking of Dave, in addition to being the world’s foremost archivist of Pacific Northwest baseball imagery, he also has a nifty collection of Northwest sports jacket patches. “The red/green ‘S’ crests are circa-1920s Seattle Metropolitans, from the old Pacific Coast Hockey League,” he says. “The beaver is a 1930s Portland Beavers jersey patch. The Seattle Sicks Stars patch is probably from the Emil Sick/Rainier Brewery-sponsored basketball team (late ’30s, early ’40s), which featured Fred Hutchinson and Dewey Soriano (Fred’s boyhood chum and teammate, and future PCL president and Seattle Pilots owner). The rest are pretty self explanatory.” … Interesting stacked TV number on the sleeve of this old Maple Leafs practice jersey (good find by Mike Hersh). … Fun historical survey on soccer cleats here (with thanks to Mike Kelley). … True story: Several years ago I was all set to become the first journalist to test-drive a set of heated hockey skate blades called Thermablades, which were supposedly going to be the next big thing in the NHL. But then the manufacturer bailed on the product demo at the last second. I never heard from them again, but my ESPN.com colleague Paula Lavigne has now written a big story on the current state of Thermablades — recommended reading. … Not often that you see a pitcher wearing a batting glove under his fielding glove, but Tyler Kepner notes that Rollie Fingers once did just that. … It’s hard to see in this photo, but Paul Soto spotted a fan wearing an odd Bears/Cubs combo jersey at Wrigley the other day. He also spotted a guy wearing a White Sox road jersey with a 2005 World Series patch, Kosuke Fukudome’s name, and uni number 01. “Wrong on so many levels,” he says. … MLS news from Markus Kemp, who writes: “The Portland Timbers have started a unique campaign in advance of unveiling the team’s new logo for its entry into MLS in 2011.” … A NBA report: “I’ve heard from some friends that work for the Phoenix Suns team shop that the Suns might be switching their orange alternate to their road primary and making the purple jersey the alt. They would also swap the ‘PHX’ with the ‘Phoenix’ wordmarks on the two jerseys. They’ve been using ‘Planet Orange’ as their motto for the past few seasons and at the home playoff games they’ve been blowing out their purple jerseys for $25.” … Aaron Bell sent some links to some incredible 1929 Chicago-area home movie footage. First up: Bears and Cardinals games at Comiskey and Wrigley (watch the ref practically dive into the pile after each play). Next: the 1929 World Series. And then some Blackhawks footage. Completely amazing stuff. … Michael Princip has taken a bunch of reader-submitted Seahawks uniform concepts and gathered them onto this page. … I know Phil posted this photo of new NHL anniversary patches yesterday, but I’m not sure if you guys have seen this larger version of the Blue Jackets design. Do we have larger views of the Sharks and/or Canucks patches yet? … Best hoops jersey ever? I think it can at least be part of the discussion. That’s the Oklahoma City University Chiefs, circa 1970s (awesome find by Warren Humphrey). … Very nice article on the silks room at Belmont Park. For those who missed it, I did my own column on this same subject two years ago. … Here’s a really nice little slideshow that tracks the intersection of baseball and the Supreme Court.

Tomorrow: Back to standard uni-centric material. Thanks for indulging me today.

 

133 comments to And We Didn’t See Groundskeeper Willie Even Once

  • Mike Hersh | June 1, 2010 at 8:08 am |

    Welcome back to the madness.

  • Ben Isaacs | June 1, 2010 at 8:16 am |

    Yikes! I need to get my hair cut.

  • RS Rogers | June 1, 2010 at 8:21 am |

    Thanks for sharing the stories, photos, and videos. Scotland is indeed an incredible place. I’ve only ever visited in winter, and even then I’d rather spend a day tramping around Scotland in freezing rain than be almost anywhere else in any weather. The only places that compare, for me, are out-of-the-way bits of western Bohemia and certain beaches on Maui. (Which Paul needs to visit to complete his collection of U.S. states.)

    I never understood the contempt for haggis; it’s really just sausage, and generally very tasty sausage at that. And while it will remain hard to make it here in the States, due to the sheep’s lung thing, the regulation against importing products containing lung is due to be lifted soon, so real haggis can soon be imported.

    And if you’ve never worn a kilt, it’s well worth trying. Check out UtiliKilts in Seattle or Sport Kilt. Amazingly comfortable, and great for hiking or any prolonged outdoor activity. You wouldn’t believe how warm a knee-length kilt is in winter, or how cool in summer.

  • LI Phil | June 1, 2010 at 8:47 am |

    welcome back big guy

    /what’s a vacation?

  • MattB | June 1, 2010 at 9:20 am |

    Wild have their 10 year patch out too, not sure if the hyperlink will work but maybe someone can help me out if it doesn’t. Thanks.

    http://cdn.nhl.com/w...

  • Ditchfarmer | June 1, 2010 at 9:23 am |

    I’m a little confused, I actually farm canola (used for canola oil) and it looks a little different than that. Yellow flowers, but a slightly different looking plant. What the hell is rapeseed?

  • Paul Lukas | June 1, 2010 at 9:26 am |

    [quote comment=”392408″]I’m a little confused, I actually farm canola (used for canola oil) and it looks a little different than that. Yellow flowers, but a slightly different looking plant. What the hell is rapeseed?[/quote]

    http://en.wikipedia....

  • Ditchfarmer | June 1, 2010 at 9:36 am |

    Thanks Paul,its interesting, in North Dakota we grow the steroid Canada style canola that is about 10 times wider than the rapeseed plant.

  • marc | June 1, 2010 at 9:37 am |

    Note to self: Never read about Paul’s vacations so far away from lunchtime. My friggin’ Pop Tarts ain’t gonna cut it now. Damn your delicious seafood photos! (Welcome back, btw)

  • Jet | June 1, 2010 at 9:41 am |

    Can’t get enough of Dave’s Portland Beavers photos!!

    -Jet

  • marc | June 1, 2010 at 9:45 am |

    This reminds me of this.

  • marc | June 1, 2010 at 9:53 am |

    Is it just me or does the guy kneeling at the far right here look like this guy?

  • =bg= | June 1, 2010 at 9:59 am |

    And I bet you never saw our castle, either: (true!)

    http://www.guthrieca...

  • interlockingtc | June 1, 2010 at 10:00 am |

    Welcome back, Paul.

    I was completely transfixed by the coopering video.

  • Elena | June 1, 2010 at 10:07 am |

    Nice travelogue, Paul! Looks like a fun trip. It’s been about 10 years since my one trip to Scotland. It was early May and 70 degrees outside, and the maid in the conference center I stayed in declared it “sweltering”. I wanted to try haggis but was too cheap to spend 7 pounds on a taste. If it tastes like goetta, I’ll pass. I got food poisoning after eating goetta in Cincy last year. Maybe it wasn’t the source, but it’s off my list of edible foods.
    I’d imagine kilts ARE comfortable–skirts are much cooler than shorts on a hot day, but get a little breezy in winter.

  • George | June 1, 2010 at 10:11 am |

    When I was in Afghanistan they offered blood sausage every morning. I tried it the first morning. BIG mistake! Those British will eat anything.

  • marc | June 1, 2010 at 10:12 am |

    Another “is it just me?” thing… the white caps looked like crap yesterday. The only team I thought pulled it off pretty well (from what few hilites I saw) were the Cardinals.

  • Fight | June 1, 2010 at 10:13 am |

    That looks like a tremendous trip Paul, thanks for sharing! Knowing that haggis is like our hometown goetta gives me a bit of courage if I ever make it over to the homeland. Again, thanks for the great pics and stories.

  • BringBackTheVet | June 1, 2010 at 10:18 am |

    Re: Langoustines

    Paul,

    Next time you’re in Philadelphia, the restuarant “Tequilas” on 16th and Locust always offers specials that feature Langoustines. They’re freaking huge, and are fantastic when paired with filet, or other authentic Mexican fare (apparently they’re big in Mexico.)

    They’re never on the menu, but they offer them as specials every day.

    Had I known, I would have mentioned this to you at the Uniwatch party a couple of summers ago.

  • LI Phil | June 1, 2010 at 10:18 am |

    [quote comment=”392421″]Another “is it just me?” thing… the white caps looked like crap yesterday. The only team I thought pulled it off pretty well (from what few hilites I saw) were the Cardinals.[/quote]

    it’s not just you

    they looked bad on every team wearing gray pants, regardless of the top, and looked really odd on teams wearing home whites (top & bottom) — especially in the bright sun…just too much white

    teams playing in the evening or in shade had it better (better contrast)…and i actually thought they looked best on teams who wore white bottoms and matching (for the most part) colored tops

    you can see pics of every team at the bottom of this set

  • RS Rogers | June 1, 2010 at 10:20 am |

    Yes, the white caps looked like crap. However, give the Astros props for sporting their red-dominant home whites. That and the star shape of their cap logo made them look the best to my eye, even if the reds didn’t exactly match.

    The bright white of the caps looked celebratory to me. It was like MLB was shouting, “Yay USA!” whereas Memorial Day is not a rah-rah celebration. It’s more like a candlelight vigil. So aside from the fact that the caps looked like crap, it also felt to me like MLB was wearing a bright Hawaiian shirt to a sombre funeral.

  • Flip | June 1, 2010 at 10:28 am |

    Welcome home, Mr. Lukas. Travel is an odd thing. New Zealand IS exotic, and the fact you’ve been there twice is awesome. Will have to wait until this evening to get through the entire travelogue, but it reminded me that while Bismarck, N.D., sounds remote, Winnipeg and Saskatoon sound exotic in their own way. Odd.(Met a guy from Prince Albert, and he confirmed it is not exotic and most remote.)

    Have to disagree about the white caps. They weren’t as obnoxious as feared. Certainly better than the previous incarnations. Why, though, did the Blue Jays have a red bill? Still wish that if they insist on these promotions, they stick with solid logotypes, but perhaps stick a Memorial Day/Fourth of July/whatever patch on the side like they do for the World Series. That stars-and-stripes make-up is just butt ugly.

  • Andy | June 1, 2010 at 10:29 am |

    [quote comment=”392425″]Yes, the white caps looked like crap. However, give the Astros props for sporting their red-dominant home whites. That and the star shape of their cap logo made them look the best to my eye, even if the reds didn’t exactly match.

    The bright white of the caps looked celebratory to me. It was like MLB was shouting, “Yay USA!” whereas Memorial Day is not a rah-rah celebration. It’s more like a candlelight vigil. So aside from the fact that the caps looked like crap, it also felt to me like MLB was wearing a bright Hawaiian shirt to a sombre funeral.[/quote]

    Couldn’t agree more. Unfortunately, try explaining that to the contingent of Americans who ‘memorialize’ those who’ve paid the ultimate debt with a day of celebratory charred meat and Busch Light.

  • Andy | June 1, 2010 at 10:30 am |

    not a knock on anyone, by the way, just seems that the ‘true’ meaning of some of our holidays has been lost over the past few decades.

  • marc | June 1, 2010 at 10:33 am |

    [quote comment=”392424″]they looked bad on every team wearing gray pants

    Amen to that. I didn’t mind the “too much white” thing, but the white cap/grey jersey/grey pants thing looked asinine.

  • Chance Michaels | June 1, 2010 at 10:40 am |

    [quote comment=”392425″]The bright white of the caps looked celebratory to me. It was like MLB was shouting, “Yay USA!” whereas Memorial Day is not a rah-rah celebration. It’s more like a candlelight vigil. So aside from the fact that the caps looked like crap, it also felt to me like MLB was wearing a bright Hawaiian shirt to a sombre funeral.[/quote]
    I don’t think any holiday celebrated with parades can ever really be considered a somber occasion. Marching bands and fire trucks aren’t exactly conducive to quiet contemplation and reflection.

  • Jim | June 1, 2010 at 10:41 am |

    Welcome back Paul. I hope to make it to Scotland one day if only for the whisky.

  • Chance Michaels | June 1, 2010 at 10:48 am |

    I’m so jealous of your trip – I go to the UK several times a year, but always to see family, which leaves little time for personal travel. But you’ve bumped Scotland way, way up my list for the next time I get to explore the sceptred isle.

  • JTH | June 1, 2010 at 10:58 am |

    [quote comment=”392426″]Have to disagree about the white caps. They weren’t as obnoxious as feared. Certainly better than the previous incarnations. Why, though, did the Blue Jays have a red bill? [/quote]
    The caps obviously looked awful on some teams (e.g. that Rockies/Giants game was a visual disaster) but others weren’t so bad. The Cardinals were mentioned already, but I thought the Phillies actually looked pretty decent even though they were in their road grays. The white trim on their unis probably helped.

    I’d imagine that the Blue Jays had a red bill to match the color of the Canadian flag.

    Better question: why were the Jays even wearing the caps on a day that isn’t even a national holiday in Canada. Why not wear them a week earlier (Victoria Day)?

  • Ricko | June 1, 2010 at 11:05 am |

    [quote comment=”392428″]not a knock on anyone, by the way, just seems that the ‘true’ meaning of some of our holidays has been lost over the past few decades.[/quote]

    No disagreement here. The overall lack of knowledge of, and appreciation for, history has turned Memorial Day and Independence Day into “Support Our Troops” Days. That concept is easy to grasp; we know about that because we see it every day on TV. The World Wars, Korea, Vietnam, the American Revolution? Oh, ick, that’s history. Borrrrrring. And work.

    For example, does ANYBODY call it “Independence Day” anymore? No, it’s “Fourth of July,” as if the reason everyone gets the day off is just to celebrate summer and watch fireworks.

    —Ricko

  • Jerry | June 1, 2010 at 11:07 am |

    [quote comment=”392435″][quote comment=”392428″]not a knock on anyone, by the way, just seems that the ‘true’ meaning of some of our holidays has been lost over the past few decades.[/quote]

    No disagreement here. The overall lack of knowledge of, and appreciation for, history has turned Memorial Day and Independence Day into “Support Our Troops” Days. That concept is easy to grasp; we know about that because we see it every day on TV. The World Wars, Korea, Vietnam, the American Revolution? Oh, ick, that’s history. Borrrrrring. And work.

    For example, does ANYBODY call it “Independence Day” anymore? No, it’s “Fourth of July,” as if the reason everyone gets the day off is just to celebrate summer and watch fireworks.

    —Ricko[/quote]

    I still call it Independence Day. Like you said Ricko, by calling it the 4th of July, you cause it to lose its meaning.

  • JimV19 | June 1, 2010 at 11:08 am |

    Welcome back, Paul!

    By the way, what happened to points A and Q on your trip?
    http://farm5.static....

    Nice plate – is that a slab of stone?
    http://farm5.static....

    If I was still a Bears fan, I’d wear this:
    http://farm5.static....

  • MPowers1634 | June 1, 2010 at 11:09 am |

    Looks like a great trip!

    As for the Archived video footage of Wrigley and the Chicago venues:

    I would LOVE to see video of this:
    http://tommcmahon.ty...

  • MPowers1634 | June 1, 2010 at 11:11 am |

    BTW,check out these pics from the Sectional baseball tournament in my area:

    http://jukebox.lohud...

    http://jukebox.lohud...

    http://jukebox.lohud...

  • JimV19 | June 1, 2010 at 11:13 am |

    [quote comment=”392436″][quote comment=”392435″][quote comment=”392428″]not a knock on anyone, by the way, just seems that the ‘true’ meaning of some of our holidays has been lost over the past few decades.[/quote]

    No disagreement here. The overall lack of knowledge of, and appreciation for, history has turned Memorial Day and Independence Day into “Support Our Troops” Days. That concept is easy to grasp; we know about that because we see it every day on TV. The World Wars, Korea, Vietnam, the American Revolution? Oh, ick, that’s history. Borrrrrring. And work.

    For example, does ANYBODY call it “Independence Day” anymore? No, it’s “Fourth of July,” as if the reason everyone gets the day off is just to celebrate summer and watch fireworks.

    —Ricko[/quote]

    I still call it Independence Day. Like you said Ricko, by calling it the 4th of July, you cause it to lose its meaning.[/quote]

    But if you call it Independence Day, some of the younger folk will think we’re celebrating our defeating the giant flying saucers:
    http://www.youtube.c...

  • LI Phil | June 1, 2010 at 11:14 am |

    [quote comment=”392436″]

    I still call it Independence Day. [/quote]

    tha’d make for a great t-shirt…knowhaimean?

  • JimV19 | June 1, 2010 at 11:18 am |

    [quote comment=”392438″]Looks like a great trip!

    As for the Archived video footage of Wrigley and the Chicago venues:

    I would LOVE to see video of this:
    http://tommcmahon.ty...

    I would love to see them bring that back to a stadium near me!

    Can’t remember if I posted this before, but if you want to get a feel for that experience, dig this:
    http://www.youtube.c...

  • Paul Lukas | June 1, 2010 at 11:18 am |

    [quote comment=”392437″]
    By the way, what happened to points A and Q on your trip?
    http://farm5.static....
    [/quote]

    “A” is hidden behind “R” — they’re the same place (Edinburgh).

    “Q” was a few miles away from “P,” so the tag is hidden.

    [quote comment=”392437″]Nice plate – is that a slab of stone?
    http://farm5.static....
    [/quote]

    A slab of slate. A slate plate!

  • Chance Michaels | June 1, 2010 at 11:19 am |

    Love that Portland Beavers patch. Ricko gave us a look at one in action just yesterday.

    Mascot logos rock.

  • Jason | June 1, 2010 at 11:20 am |

    One thing that I would recommend continuing the coverage on would be the women’s volleyball uniforms. I can’t quite put my finger on why I’m so interested but please, keep the updates coming.

    Regarding that Cubs/Bears jersey hybrid: maybe the guy just has a newly purchased Cubs jersey draped on himself?

  • mike 2 | June 1, 2010 at 11:21 am |

    Welcome back!

    Haggis is one of those foods that sounds awful when you describe it but which turns out to be delicious.

    If you ever get a chance to go to a Robbie Burns day dinner, where the haggis is ceremonially served while an actor recites Burns’ poem “Ode to a Haggis”, its an experience not to be missed.

    Followed by the traditional haggis toss:

    http://en.wikipedia....

  • Paul Lukas | June 1, 2010 at 11:22 am |

    [quote comment=”392440″]But if you call it Independence Day, some of the younger folk will think we’re celebrating our defeating the giant flying saucers:
    http://www.youtube.c...

    Agreed, sort of. I called the holiday “Independence Day” for many, many years, until that movie came along and the term suddenly resonated in a whole different pop-cultural way. But I think it’s now been long enough now that we can reclaim the name.

  • MPowers1634 | June 1, 2010 at 11:22 am |

    [quote comment=”392416″]Is it just me or does the guy kneeling at the far right here look like this guy?[/quote]

    I think he more closely resembles this guy:
    http://www.thecorleo...

  • MPowers1634 | June 1, 2010 at 11:23 am |

    [quote comment=”392447″][quote comment=”392440″]But if you call it Independence Day, some of the younger folk will think we’re celebrating our defeating the giant flying saucers:
    http://www.youtube.c...

    Agreed, sort of. I called the holiday “Independence Day” for many, many years, until that movie came along and the term suddenly resonated in a whole different pop-cultural way. But I think it’s now been long enough now that we can reclaim the name.[/quote]

    Until the sequel comes out:
    http://www.aceshowbi...

  • Bernard | June 1, 2010 at 11:23 am |

    [quote comment=”392440″][quote comment=”392436″][quote comment=”392435″][quote comment=”392428″]not a knock on anyone, by the way, just seems that the ‘true’ meaning of some of our holidays has been lost over the past few decades.[/quote]

    No disagreement here. The overall lack of knowledge of, and appreciation for, history has turned Memorial Day and Independence Day into “Support Our Troops” Days. That concept is easy to grasp; we know about that because we see it every day on TV. The World Wars, Korea, Vietnam, the American Revolution? Oh, ick, that’s history. Borrrrrring. And work.

    For example, does ANYBODY call it “Independence Day” anymore? No, it’s “Fourth of July,” as if the reason everyone gets the day off is just to celebrate summer and watch fireworks.

    —Ricko[/quote]

    I still call it Independence Day. Like you said Ricko, by calling it the 4th of July, you cause it to lose its meaning.[/quote]

    But if you call it Independence Day, some of the younger folk will think we’re celebrating our defeating the giant flying saucers:
    http://www.youtube.c...

    In fairness, that is a great movie. The DVD makes a good XMAS stocking stuffer.

  • marc | June 1, 2010 at 11:24 am |

    [quote comment=”392441″][quote comment=”392436″]

    I still call it Independence Day. [/quote]

    tha’d make for a great t-shirt…knowhaimean?[/quote]

    LMAO… a great joke for those who “get it.”

    You could market to history buffs a handful of those such as “I Still Call It The War Between the States,” or “I Still Call It Boulder Dam.”

  • JimV19 | June 1, 2010 at 11:25 am |

    [quote comment=”392447″][quote comment=”392440″]But if you call it Independence Day, some of the younger folk will think we’re celebrating our defeating the giant flying saucers:
    http://www.youtube.c...

    Agreed, sort of. I called the holiday “Independence Day” for many, many years, until that movie came along and the term suddenly resonated in a whole different pop-cultural way. But I think it’s now been long enough now that we can reclaim the name.[/quote]

    Yeah, just realized that movie’s almost 15 years old. Wow, time flies.

  • JTH | June 1, 2010 at 11:25 am |

    [quote comment=”392443″]
    “A” is hidden behind “R” — they’re the same place (Edinburgh).

    “Q” was a few miles away from “P,” so the tag is hidden.
    [/quote]

    A slab of slate. A slate plate![/quote]
    Hmmmm… My two oldest kids’ names start with A and Q. The little one’s starts with R and we’re trying to get him to go “P” somewhere other than in his pants.

  • marc | June 1, 2010 at 11:26 am |

    [quote comment=”392448″][quote comment=”392416″]Is it just me or does the guy kneeling at the far right here look like this guy?[/quote]

    I think he more closely resembles this guy:
    http://www.thecorleo...

    Or is it this guy?

  • MPowers1634 | June 1, 2010 at 11:32 am |

    [quote comment=”392454″][quote comment=”392448″][quote comment=”392416″]Is it just me or does the guy kneeling at the far right here look like this guy?[/quote]

    I think he more closely resembles this guy:
    http://www.thecorleo...

    Or is it this guy?[/quote]

    In an “abstract” way, he looks a little like this guy as well:

    http://www.tate.org....

    OK, I’m done!

  • Mark in Shiga | June 1, 2010 at 11:36 am |

    One team that looked pretty good in the special caps was the Mariners.

  • James Hayden | June 1, 2010 at 11:40 am |

    [quote comment=”392451″][quote comment=”392441″][quote comment=”392436″]

    I still call it Independence Day. [/quote]

    tha’d make for a great t-shirt…knowhaimean?[/quote]

    LMAO… a great joke for those who “get it.”

    You could market to history buffs a handful of those such as “I Still Call It The War Between the States,” or “I Still Call It Boulder Dam.”[/quote]

    In chronological order:

    “I still call it The War of Northern Aggression”

    “I still call it Custer’s Battlefield”

    “I still call it The Great War”

    Plus there’s the whole USA v. CSA Civil War battlefield naming dispute (Antietam/Sharpsburg, Bull Run/Manassas, Pittsburg Landing/Shiloh). The history-geek market’s an untapped gold-mine!

  • JimV19 | June 1, 2010 at 11:42 am |

    [quote comment=”392445″]One thing that I would recommend continuing the coverage on would be the women’s volleyball uniforms. I can’t quite put my finger on why I’m so interested but please, keep the updates coming.[/quote]

    I agree – the men as well as the women have some interesting unis.

    As for that slideshow on baseball and the Supreme Court, I always thought a good nickname for a DC team would be the Justices or the Supremes.

    Justices would be good for baseball – nine justices and nine field players. Plus, think of the headline possibilities: “Justices in 5-4 decision over Mets,” “Justices unanimous in 9-0 win over Pirates,” etc.

    If the Wizards want to change names without going back to the Bullets, they could try the Supremes. Then they could play on the Supremes Court at the Verizon Center.

  • Paul Lukas | June 1, 2010 at 11:44 am |

    I know there’s been a lot of chatter about Rondo wearing different-colored shoes than the rest of the Celtics. If anyone knows more about the story behind that, pls. contact me asap. Thanks!

  • Ricko | June 1, 2010 at 11:50 am |

    [quote comment=”392457″][quote comment=”392451″][quote comment=”392441″][quote comment=”392436″]

    I still call it Independence Day. [/quote]

    tha’d make for a great t-shirt…knowhaimean?[/quote]

    LMAO… a great joke for those who “get it.”

    You could market to history buffs a handful of those such as “I Still Call It The War Between the States,” or “I Still Call It Boulder Dam.”[/quote]

    In chronological order:

    “I still call it The War of Northern Aggression”

    “I still call it Custer’s Battlefield”

    “I still call it The Great War”

    Plus there’s the whole USA v. CSA Civil War battlefield naming dispute (Antietam/Sharpsburg, Bull Run/Manassas, Pittsburg Landing/Shiloh). The history-geek market’s an untapped gold-mine![/quote]

    “I still call it Armistice Day”

    “I still call it Lincoln’s Birthday”

    “I still call it Washington’s Birthday”

    “I still call it the Search for Weapons of Mass Destruction”

  • JTH | June 1, 2010 at 11:52 am |

    [quote comment=”392458″][quote comment=”392445″]One thing that I would recommend continuing the coverage on would be the women’s volleyball uniforms. I can’t quite put my finger on why I’m so interested but please, keep the updates coming.[/quote]

    I agree – the men as well as the women have some interesting unis.

    As for that slideshow on baseball and the Supreme Court, I always thought a good nickname for a DC team would be the Justices or the Supremes.

    Justices would be good for baseball – nine justices and nine field players. Plus, think of the headline possibilities: “Justices in 5-4 decision over Mets,” “Justices unanimous in 9-0 win over Pirates,” etc.

    If the Wizards want to change names without going back to the Bullets, they could try the Supremes. Then they could play on the Supremes Court at the Verizon Center.[/quote]
    Supremes?

    Home.

    Road.

    Alt.

    St. Paddy’s/Earth Day?

    Hmmmm… what about Noche Latina unis?

  • JimV19 | June 1, 2010 at 11:52 am |

    [quote comment=”392457″][quote comment=”392451″][quote comment=”392441″][quote comment=”392436″]

    I still call it Independence Day. [/quote]

    tha’d make for a great t-shirt…knowhaimean?[/quote]

    LMAO… a great joke for those who “get it.”

    You could market to history buffs a handful of those such as “I Still Call It The War Between the States,” or “I Still Call It Boulder Dam.”[/quote]

    In chronological order:

    “I still call it The War of Northern Aggression”

    “I still call it Custer’s Battlefield”

    “I still call it The Great War”

    Plus there’s the whole USA v. CSA Civil War battlefield naming dispute (Antietam/Sharpsburg, Bull Run/Manassas, Pittsburg Landing/Shiloh). The history-geek market’s an untapped gold-mine![/quote]

    And five days from now you can wear your choice of the following shirts:
    “I’m Calling It The Normandy Landings”
    “I’m Calling It Operation Neptune”
    etc., etc.,

  • jim greenfield | June 1, 2010 at 11:54 am |

    The Pirates looked great yesterday, white hats and all. To see a whole team with high socks is truly bitter sweet knowing they’ll be back to the garbage look tomorrow.

  • JimV19 | June 1, 2010 at 11:55 am |

    [quote comment=”392461″][quote comment=”392458″][quote comment=”392445″]One thing that I would recommend continuing the coverage on would be the women’s volleyball uniforms. I can’t quite put my finger on why I’m so interested but please, keep the updates coming.[/quote]

    I agree – the men as well as the women have some interesting unis.

    As for that slideshow on baseball and the Supreme Court, I always thought a good nickname for a DC team would be the Justices or the Supremes.

    Justices would be good for baseball – nine justices and nine field players. Plus, think of the headline possibilities: “Justices in 5-4 decision over Mets,” “Justices unanimous in 9-0 win over Pirates,” etc.

    If the Wizards want to change names without going back to the Bullets, they could try the Supremes. Then they could play on the Supremes Court at the Verizon Center.[/quote]
    Supremes?

    Home.

    Road.

    Alt.

    St. Paddy’s/Earth Day?

    Hmmmm… what about Noche Latina unis?[/quote]

    I like the shiny ones.
    I’d let Mrs. V wear those.

  • marc | June 1, 2010 at 11:55 am |

    [quote comment=”392457″][quote comment=”392451″][quote comment=”392441″][quote comment=”392436″]

    I still call it Independence Day. [/quote]

    tha’d make for a great t-shirt…knowhaimean?[/quote]

    LMAO… a great joke for those who “get it.”

    You could market to history buffs a handful of those such as “I Still Call It The War Between the States,” or “I Still Call It Boulder Dam.”[/quote]

    In chronological order:

    “I still call it The War of Northern Aggression”

    “I still call it Custer’s Battlefield”

    “I still call it The Great War”

    Plus there’s the whole USA v. CSA Civil War battlefield naming dispute (Antietam/Sharpsburg, Bull Run/Manassas, Pittsburg Landing/Shiloh). The history-geek market’s an untapped gold-mine![/quote]

    That’s funny… I almost used the “Great War” but chose Boulder Dam instead so as not to have two wars. The battlefield naming dispute as ISCI shirts is GENIUS! You could also kill two birds with one stone and go the sports history route with shirts like “I Still Call It Base Ball,” or “I Still Call Them Cagers.”

  • Ricko | June 1, 2010 at 11:57 am |

    [quote comment=”392461″][quote comment=”392458″][quote comment=”392445″]One thing that I would recommend continuing the coverage on would be the women’s volleyball uniforms. I can’t quite put my finger on why I’m so interested but please, keep the updates coming.[/quote]

    I agree – the men as well as the women have some interesting unis.

    As for that slideshow on baseball and the Supreme Court, I always thought a good nickname for a DC team would be the Justices or the Supremes.

    Justices would be good for baseball – nine justices and nine field players. Plus, think of the headline possibilities: “Justices in 5-4 decision over Mets,” “Justices unanimous in 9-0 win over Pirates,” etc.

    If the Wizards want to change names without going back to the Bullets, they could try the Supremes. Then they could play on the Supremes Court at the Verizon Center.[/quote]
    Supremes?

    Home.

    Road.

    Alt.

    St. Paddy’s/Earth Day?

    Hmmmm… what about Noche Latina unis?[/quote]

    The Supremes (not BFBS)…
    http://blogs.rj.org/...

    —Ricko

  • M.Princip | June 1, 2010 at 11:58 am |

    Enjoyed the write-up today Paul. I’ve been to Glasgow and Ayr for a friend’s wedding. So true about the entire country looking like a, “highlight reel of nature’s greatest hits.” I even had a chance to visit the famousTurnberry golf course. I do believe that would be your best chance at spotting Groundskeeper Willie.

  • jimwa | June 1, 2010 at 12:14 pm |

    Loved loved loved the Tigers look. Made me feel like I was partying like it was 1929

  • Bucket | June 1, 2010 at 12:20 pm |

    What is the deal with all the people on the field at the end of the 1929 World Series game? Are those people spectators exiting the stadium by walking across the field?

  • StLMarty | June 1, 2010 at 12:59 pm |

    I call it Independence For Whites Only Day.

    The D.O.I. is an awkward read if you consider slavery.
    Of course, everyone knows that.

  • Ricko | June 1, 2010 at 1:10 pm |

    [quote comment=”392470″]I call it Independence For Whites Only Day.

    The D.O.I. is an awkward read if you consider slavery.
    Of course, everyone knows that.[/quote]

    The reference is to declaring independence from England, of course. As a document, it is political in its purpose. That element is worth celebration.

    When you get into the DOI’s content/philosophy/rationale, though, it does expose some of what Bill Maher calls the “fault lines” on which the USA was established.

    That does not, however, eliminate the appropriateness of celebrating when the nation—even with its “fault lines”–was born.

    —Ricko

  • Original Jim | June 1, 2010 at 1:13 pm |

    The reason you don’t see pitchers with batting gloves under their fielding gloves is because it’s illegal.

    I can’t recall the specific rule, but pitchers are not allowed to wear anything on either arm besides their jerseys (long sleeved/underarmour etc) and their pitching gloves. Batting gloves allow more opportunity to either conceal a foreign object, or become one for the purpose of doctoring a baseball.

    I’m pretty sure pitchers can’t even wear wristbands, for the very same reason, although Pedro Martinez may have circumvented this by having a sweatband built into his glove.

  • StLMarty | June 1, 2010 at 1:23 pm |

    [quote comment=”392471″][quote comment=”392470″]I call it Independence For Whites Only Day.

    The D.O.I. is an awkward read if you consider slavery.
    Of course, everyone knows that.[/quote]

    The reference is to declaring independence from England, of course. As a document, it is political in its purpose. That element is worth celebration.

    When you get into the DOI’s content/philosophy/rationale, though, it does expose some of what Bill Maher calls the “fault lines” on which the USA was established.

    That does not, however, eliminate the appropriateness of celebrating when the nation—even with its “fault lines”–was born.

    —Ricko[/quote]
    I was speaking flippantly. I get everything that you said. I just get worked up by the insane number of people who don’t recognize the “fault lines”.

  • marc | June 1, 2010 at 1:45 pm |

    [quote comment=”392473″][quote comment=”392471″][quote comment=”392470″]I call it Independence For Whites Only Day.

    The D.O.I. is an awkward read if you consider slavery.
    Of course, everyone knows that.[/quote]

    The reference is to declaring independence from England, of course. As a document, it is political in its purpose. That element is worth celebration.

    When you get into the DOI’s content/philosophy/rationale, though, it does expose some of what Bill Maher calls the “fault lines” on which the USA was established.

    That does not, however, eliminate the appropriateness of celebrating when the nation—even with its “fault lines”–was born.

    —Ricko[/quote]
    I was speaking flippantly. I get everything that you said. I just get worked up by the insane number of people who don’t recognize the “fault lines”.[/quote]

    kind of an inflammatory comment to be flippant about, no?

  • James Hayden | June 1, 2010 at 1:51 pm |

    [/quote]
    That’s funny… I almost used the “Great War” but chose Boulder Dam instead so as not to have two wars. The battlefield naming dispute as ISCI shirts is GENIUS! You could also kill two birds with one stone and go the sports history route with shirts like “I Still Call It Base Ball,” or “I Still Call Them Cagers.”[/quote]

    Heh – the local weekly paper was still using the term “cagers” well into this century…

  • marc | June 1, 2010 at 1:53 pm |

    [quote comment=”392474″][quote comment=”392473″]
    I was speaking flippantly. I get everything that you said. I just get worked up by the insane number of people who don’t recognize the “fault lines”.[/quote]

    kind of an inflammatory comment to be flippant about, no?[/quote]

    Then again, my comment now seems a bit inflammatory (snarky at the least). no offense intended, StLMarty.

  • marc | June 1, 2010 at 1:54 pm |

    [quote comment=”392475″][/quote]
    That’s funny… I almost used the “Great War” but chose Boulder Dam instead so as not to have two wars. The battlefield naming dispute as ISCI shirts is GENIUS! You could also kill two birds with one stone and go the sports history route with shirts like “I Still Call It Base Ball,” or “I Still Call Them Cagers.”[/quote]

    Heh – the local weekly paper was still using the term “cagers” well into this century…[/quote]

    When I was a kid, high school “cagers,” grapplers,” and “gridders” ruled the sports page.

  • MPowers1634 | June 1, 2010 at 1:58 pm |

    [quote comment=”392472″]The reason you don’t see pitchers with batting gloves under their fielding gloves is because it’s illegal.

    I can’t recall the specific rule, but pitchers are not allowed to wear anything on either arm besides their jerseys (long sleeved/underarmour etc) and their pitching gloves. Batting gloves allow more opportunity to either conceal a foreign object, or become one for the purpose of doctoring a baseball.

    I’m pretty sure pitchers can’t even wear wristbands, for the very same reason, although Pedro Martinez may have circumvented this by having a sweatband built into his glove.[/quote]

    Rule 6 Pitching,
    Section 2 Infractions by the Pitcher,
    Article 1…Illegal acts include:

    f.wearing any items on the hands, wrists or arms that may be distracting to the batter.

    g. wearing or placing tape, bandages or other foreign material(other than rosin) on the fingers or palm of his pitching hand that could come in contact with the ball.

    h. wearing a glove/mitt that includes the colors white or gray.

    i. wearing exposed undershirt sleeves that are white or gray.

  • Mark | June 1, 2010 at 2:00 pm |

    Bagpipes: Yes, there are actually people playing them, but only for formal occasions and/or to amuse the tourists. Basically, it’s reached the level of shtick

    Ironically, the Scottish Pipe Band Championships were held in Dumbarton, Scotland on May 22. The 127 bagpipe bands in attendance might not agree with that it has become “shtick”…

  • Ricko | June 1, 2010 at 2:01 pm |

    [quote comment=”392477″][quote comment=”392475″][/quote]
    That’s funny… I almost used the “Great War” but chose Boulder Dam instead so as not to have two wars. The battlefield naming dispute as ISCI shirts is GENIUS! You could also kill two birds with one stone and go the sports history route with shirts like “I Still Call It Base Ball,” or “I Still Call Them Cagers.”[/quote]

    Heh – the local weekly paper was still using the term “cagers” well into this century…[/quote]

    When I was a kid, high school “cagers,” grapplers,” and “gridders” ruled the sports page.[/quote]

    BUT…are bowlers still “keglers”?
    And cross country runners “harriers”?
    And what about “hoopsters” in basketball?

    So maybe Paul (and others) needs a teeshirt…
    YES, I’M
    A KEGLER

    —Ricko

  • marc | June 1, 2010 at 2:17 pm |

    [quote comment=”392481″]BUT…are bowlers still “keglers”?
    And cross country runners “harriers”?
    And what about “hoopsters” in basketball?

    So maybe Paul (and others) needs a teeshirt…
    YES, I’M
    A KEGLER

    —Ricko[/quote]

    I’m red-faced for not including “keglers.” Here in Cleveland, there used to be a local bowling mag called “The Kegler” that was always laying around the house.

  • Ricko | June 1, 2010 at 2:18 pm |

    [quote comment=”392473″][quote comment=”392471″][quote comment=”392470″]I call it Independence For Whites Only Day.

    The D.O.I. is an awkward read if you consider slavery.
    Of course, everyone knows that.[/quote]

    The reference is to declaring independence from England, of course. As a document, it is political in its purpose. That element is worth celebration.

    When you get into the DOI’s content/philosophy/rationale, though, it does expose some of what Bill Maher calls the “fault lines” on which the USA was established.

    That does not, however, eliminate the appropriateness of celebrating when the nation—even with its “fault lines”–was born.

    —Ricko[/quote]
    I was speaking flippantly. I get everything that you said. I just get worked up by the insane number of people who don’t recognize the “fault lines”.[/quote][quote comment=”392473″][quote comment=”392471″][quote comment=”392470″]I call it Independence For Whites Only Day.

    The D.O.I. is an awkward read if you consider slavery.
    Of course, everyone knows that.[/quote]

    The reference is to declaring independence from England, of course. As a document, it is political in its purpose. That element is worth celebration.

    When you get into the DOI’s content/philosophy/rationale, though, it does expose some of what Bill Maher calls the “fault lines” on which the USA was established.

    That does not, however, eliminate the appropriateness of celebrating when the nation—even with its “fault lines”–was born.

    —Ricko[/quote]
    I was speaking flippantly. I get everything that you said. I just get worked up by the insane number of people who don’t recognize the “fault lines”.[/quote]

    Absolutely. Goes to my earlier comment that when it comes to history (American or otherwise) most people can’t find their butt with both hands.

    —Ricko

  • LI Phil | June 1, 2010 at 2:21 pm |

    [quote comment=”392470″]I call it Independence For Whites Only Day.

    The D.O.I. is an awkward read if you consider slavery.
    Of course, everyone knows that.[/quote]

    fair point marty…

    i guess you know this too…

    not all those who were involved in the DOI were pro-slavery; far from it…but like everything else we don’t always learn in school nowadays, it was more important to have the colonies united in their opposition to the crown, and compromise and dealmaking were the key … the north (almost united in its opposition to slavery) needed all of the southern colonies and failing that, there’d be no DOI to celebrate (or at least not on 7/4/1776)

  • marc | June 1, 2010 at 2:34 pm |

    [quote comment=”392484″][quote comment=”392470″]I call it Independence For Whites Only Day.

    The D.O.I. is an awkward read if you consider slavery.
    Of course, everyone knows that.[/quote]

    fair point marty…

    i guess you know this too…

    not all those who were involved in the DOI were pro-slavery; far from it…but like everything else we don’t always learn in school nowadays, it was more important to have the colonies united in their opposition to the crown, and compromise and dealmaking were the key … the north (almost united in its opposition to slavery) needed all of the southern colonies and failing that, there’d be no DOI to celebrate (or at least not on 7/4/1776)[/quote]

    Had it not been for the cotton gin, slavery may have been abolished or at least heavily diminished years earlier.

  • Comic Book Guy | June 1, 2010 at 2:52 pm |

    Worst .. Uni-Watch … Entry …. Ever.

  • Ricko | June 1, 2010 at 2:54 pm |

    [quote comment=”392484″][quote comment=”392470″]I call it Independence For Whites Only Day.

    The D.O.I. is an awkward read if you consider slavery.
    Of course, everyone knows that.[/quote]

    fair point marty…

    i guess you know this too…

    not all those who were involved in the DOI were pro-slavery; far from it…but like everything else we don’t always learn in school nowadays, it was more important to have the colonies united in their opposition to the crown, and compromise and dealmaking were the key … the north (almost united in its opposition to slavery) needed all of the southern colonies and failing that, there’d be no DOI to celebrate (or at least not on 7/4/1776)[/quote]

    Compromise? In government?
    Oh, good luck with that today.

    Then again we have to factor in that Adams, Adams, Johnson, Franklin, Jefferson, Washington, Payne, Hamilton and all those other wig-wearers in their high white socks probably were a helluva lot smarter than the gang in Washington today (both parties).

    —Ricko

  • marc | June 1, 2010 at 2:59 pm |

    [quote comment=”392486″]Worst .. Uni-Watch … Entry …. Ever.[/quote]

    Yeah, I know.

  • Ricko | June 1, 2010 at 3:03 pm |

    [quote comment=”392488″][quote comment=”392486″]Worst .. Uni-Watch … Entry …. Ever.[/quote]

    Yeah, I know.[/quote]

    Cheer up. Pretzel M&Ms debut this week.

  • marc | June 1, 2010 at 3:06 pm |

    [quote comment=”392489″][quote comment=”392488″][quote comment=”392486″]Worst .. Uni-Watch … Entry …. Ever.[/quote]

    Yeah, I know.[/quote]

    Cheer up. Pretzel M&Ms debut this week.[/quote]

    Had ’em a month or so ago.. not bad. We must be a test market.

  • Ricko | June 1, 2010 at 3:12 pm |

    [quote comment=”392490″][quote comment=”392489″][quote comment=”392488″][quote comment=”392486″]Worst .. Uni-Watch … Entry …. Ever.[/quote]

    Yeah, I know.[/quote]

    Cheer up. Pretzel M&Ms debut this week.[/quote]

    Had ’em a month or so ago.. not bad. We must be a test market.[/quote]

    Crap, haven’t been keeping up on my candy coverage, I guess. ;)

    “Candy Coverage”? Doesn’t she have her own website?

    And, yes, the Mariners and the Tigers were among those who didn’t look half-bad yesterday/last night. All things considered, that is.

    Although, because I watched the Twin-Mariners…the navy blue visor was considerably lighter than the Mariners dark alts.

    But still, fairly decent.

    So what’s next year’s hat…camo?

    —Ricko

  • Ricko | June 1, 2010 at 3:17 pm |

    Maybe something like this…
    http://www.theoldwes...

  • Ricko | June 1, 2010 at 3:17 pm |

    Okay, okay, first hat here…
    http://www.theoldwes...

  • Ricko | June 1, 2010 at 3:19 pm |

    [quote comment=”392493″]Okay, okay, first hat here…
    http://www.theoldwes...

    With the regular color hat logo, of course.

  • Ricko | June 1, 2010 at 3:20 pm |

    Or the other way around…
    http://www.partywedd...

  • marc | June 1, 2010 at 3:26 pm |

    [quote comment=”392491″]And, yes, the Mariners and the Tigers were among those who didn’t look half-bad yesterday/last night. All things considered, that is.

    Although, because I watched the Twin-Mariners…the navy blue visor was considerably lighter than the Mariners dark alts.

    But still, fairly decent.

    So what’s next year’s hat…camo?

    —Ricko[/quote]

    Rhinestones would be nice. Or maybe tie-dye. I’m kinda surprised MLB hasn’t done visors… yet. They’ll do anything to sell headgear, so I wouldn’t put it past ’em.

  • Ricko | June 1, 2010 at 3:27 pm |

    Next year is, after all, the 200th Anniversary of the year before the War of 1812.

  • Ricko | June 1, 2010 at 3:31 pm |

    Something like this?

    Hey, stars n’ stripes.
    http://i.cdn.turner....

  • Ry Co 40 | June 1, 2010 at 3:31 pm |

    [quote comment=”392424″][quote comment=”392421″]Another “is it just me?” thing… the white caps looked like crap yesterday. The only team I thought pulled it off pretty well (from what few hilites I saw) were the Cardinals.[/quote]

    it’s not just you

    they looked bad on every team wearing gray pants, regardless of the top, and looked really odd on teams wearing home whites (top & bottom) — especially in the bright sun…just too much white

    teams playing in the evening or in shade had it better (better contrast)…and i actually thought they looked best on teams who wore white bottoms and matching (for the most part) colored tops

    you can see pics of every team at the bottom of this set[/quote]

    whoa! did i miss something? is there morris code on the fenway scoreboard?

    http://www.flickr.co...

  • Ricko | June 1, 2010 at 3:32 pm |

    For those who prefer a higher crown, ala the ’70s…
    http://z.about.com/d...

  • Ricko | June 1, 2010 at 3:33 pm |

    Aw, shoot, the whole thing’s a Mickey Mouse idea in the first place.
    http://www.dizpins.c...

  • Ricko | June 1, 2010 at 3:37 pm |

    [quote comment=”392499″][quote comment=”392424″][quote comment=”392421″]Another “is it just me?” thing… the white caps looked like crap yesterday. The only team I thought pulled it off pretty well (from what few hilites I saw) were the Cardinals.[/quote]

    it’s not just you

    they looked bad on every team wearing gray pants, regardless of the top, and looked really odd on teams wearing home whites (top & bottom) — especially in the bright sun…just too much white

    teams playing in the evening or in shade had it better (better contrast)…and i actually thought they looked best on teams who wore white bottoms and matching (for the most part) colored tops

    you can see pics of every team at the bottom of this set[/quote]

    whoa! did i miss something? is there morris code on the fenway scoreboard?

    http://www.flickr.co...

    Yup, invented by Phillip Morris.
    Pretty damn sneaky way to get a cigarette billboard into a ballpark if you ask me.

    Although maybe it just says, “What hath Bloomquist dropped.”

  • LI Phil | June 1, 2010 at 3:38 pm |

    [quote comment=”392499″]
    whoa! did i miss something? is there morris code on the fenway scoreboard?

    http://www.flickr.co...

    jack morris?

  • marc | June 1, 2010 at 3:41 pm |

    [quote comment=”392499″][quote comment=”392424″][quote comment=”392421″]Another “is it just me?” thing… the white caps looked like crap yesterday. The only team I thought pulled it off pretty well (from what few hilites I saw) were the Cardinals.[/quote]

    it’s not just you

    they looked bad on every team wearing gray pants, regardless of the top, and looked really odd on teams wearing home whites (top & bottom) — especially in the bright sun…just too much white

    teams playing in the evening or in shade had it better (better contrast)…and i actually thought they looked best on teams who wore white bottoms and matching (for the most part) colored tops

    you can see pics of every team at the bottom of this set[/quote]

    whoa! did i miss something? is there morris code on the fenway scoreboard?

    http://www.flickr.co...

    I think you may have missed something. The Morse Code has been there awhile.

    From Wiki: “The Morse Code that appears from top to bottom in the white lines of the American League scoreboard are the initials of former owners Thomas A. Yawkey and Jean R. Yawkey.[3]”

  • Ricardo Leonor | June 1, 2010 at 4:03 pm |

    Was just listening to WFAN on the computer. Mike ?Francesa said the white memorial day caps cost $37 and ONE DOLLAR goes to charity? Can this be verified?

    Paul where is the pic of you wearing a Tartan Kilt and matching stirrups!

  • Stuby | June 1, 2010 at 4:06 pm |

    [quote comment=”392505″]Was just listening to WFAN on the computer. Mike ?Francesa said the white memorial day caps cost $37 and ONE DOLLAR goes to charity? Can this be verified?

    Paul where is the pic of you wearing a Tartan Kilt and matching stirrups![/quote]
    Does MLB ever come clean with how many of these awful caps are actually sold? Who the Hell would buy one?

  • RS Rogers | June 1, 2010 at 4:06 pm |

    For next year, how about skipping the garish caps and putting this patch on everyone’s sleeve:

    http://cgi.ebay.com/...

    If it was patriotic enough for WWII, surely it’s patriotic enough for today.

    That, or how about this: No caps, no patches, nothing that can be sold at a team store. Instead, the league promises to pay the current salary of any player who chooses to join the armed forces for the duration of his service. Minor-league enlistees could maybe get a one-time bonus equal to the big-league minimum wage.

  • Ricko | June 1, 2010 at 4:08 pm |

    [quote comment=”392505″]Was just listening to WFAN on the computer. Mike ?Francesa said the white memorial day caps cost $37 and ONE DOLLAR goes to charity? Can this be verified?

    Paul where is the pic of you wearing a Tartan Kilt and matching stirrups![/quote]

    Something about the money in yesterday afternoon’s comments, I believe.

    —Ricko

  • StLMarty | June 1, 2010 at 4:09 pm |

    [quote comment=”392484″][quote comment=”392470″]I call it Independence For Whites Only Day.

    The D.O.I. is an awkward read if you consider slavery.
    Of course, everyone knows that.[/quote]

    fair point marty…

    i guess you know this too…

    not all those who were involved in the DOI were pro-slavery; far from it…but like everything else we don’t always learn in school nowadays, it was more important to have the colonies united in their opposition to the crown, and compromise and dealmaking were the key … the north (almost united in its opposition to slavery) needed all of the southern colonies and failing that, there’d be no DOI to celebrate (or at least not on 7/4/1776)[/quote]
    My point was obvious. Almost cliche. Everyone knows, or should know, that there has been hypocracy (and a love of cash) from the get go. I just wish that we were a better country at acknowledging our faults.
    P.S. I hate to continue the discussion. It is unnecessary and out of place. I should not have made my comment. However, it would never have happened if MLB didn’t make those stupid ass hats. So it all comes back to uniforms.

    Happy McCarthyism Day!

  • JTH | June 1, 2010 at 4:09 pm |

    [quote comment=”392508″][quote comment=”392505″]Was just listening to WFAN on the computer. Mike ?Francesa said the white memorial day caps cost $37 and ONE DOLLAR goes to charity? Can this be verified?

    Paul where is the pic of you wearing a Tartan Kilt and matching stirrups![/quote]

    Something about the money in yesterday afternoon’s comments, I believe.

    —Ricko[/quote]
    Supposedly all proceeds go to the Welcome Back Veterans charity, but if you buy it thru MLB.com, an extra dollar gets donated.

    Although, if you read the description, it sure sounds like a total of only one dollar gets donated:
    MLB.com will donate $1 to the WBV Fund for each cap sold

  • Ricko | June 1, 2010 at 4:17 pm |

    [quote comment=”392507″]For next year, how about skipping the garish caps and putting this patch on everyone’s sleeve:

    http://cgi.ebay.com/...

    If it was patriotic enough for WWII, surely it’s patriotic enough for today.

    That, or how about this: No caps, no patches, nothing that can be sold at a team store. Instead, the league promises to pay the current salary of any player who chooses to join the armed forces for the duration of his service. Minor-league enlistees could maybe get a one-time bonus equal to the big-league minimum wage.[/quote]

    Dignity? Restraint? Good taste? In MLB? Surely you jest.

    And you make a good point. Much of this “Support Our Troops” really is “Thank you for doing it because me and my family really would rather not have it touch us.”

    Many, many players and fans are of military age and oh, so patriotic, but I don’t see them hurrying off to enlist. Sometimes it feels like these great showings of support are more like “Let the Other Guy Do It” Day.

    Pat Tillman being a notable exception, of course.

    —Ricko

  • Ricardo Leonor | June 1, 2010 at 4:17 pm |

    It sure reads like only $1 is being donated. If the whole point was to raise funds for a charity, giving only $1 is a shame….

  • Ricardo Leonor | June 1, 2010 at 4:20 pm |

    One question for any Indian fans, does Shin-Soo Choo always wear a double flap batting helmet?

  • Matt W | June 1, 2010 at 4:32 pm |

    I know that most on this board will find the story below a) typical and b) more reason that Nike should burn in hell. As was commented on a day or so ago, the Jordan statue outside the United Center was wearing a Blackhawks sweater. However, as Chad had noted, Reebok also threw some of their blades on the Air Jordans, too. Given Jordan’s well documents Olympic aversion to Reebok, it was sage to assume heads would roll at the UC.

    The wrong has been righted, at least as Spike Lee or Mars Blackmon is concerned . . . and probably MJ, too.

    http://sports.yahoo....

  • Dane | June 1, 2010 at 5:01 pm |

    Hey Paul, if you miss your glory day of being part of the Citi Field flush test, maybe a road trip to Pittsburgh is in order:

    The Pittsburgh Penguins are looking for 250 students to help with an important task and there’s only one major requirement: You must know how to flush a toilet.

    Construction is near completion on the Penguins’ new arena, the Consol Energy Center. But like with any new arena or stadium, officials need to simultaneously flush all the toilets and urinals to make sure everything is working. The Penguins are calling the June 10 event the “Student Flush,” a spinoff of their popular ticketing program known as “Student Rush.”

    Students already involved in the ticketing program can enter for a chance to win. Students must be 18 or older to participate in the flush-apalooza.

    In all, there will be 400 flushers, including some construction officials, on hand that day.

  • Jim BC | June 1, 2010 at 5:30 pm |

    [quote comment=”392515″]Hey Paul, if you miss your glory day of being part of the Citi Field flush test, maybe a road trip to Pittsburgh is in order:

    The Pittsburgh Penguins are looking for 250 students to help with an important task and there’s only one major requirement: You must know how to flush a toilet.

    Construction is near completion on the Penguins’ new arena, the Consol Energy Center. But like with any new arena or stadium, officials need to simultaneously flush all the toilets and urinals to make sure everything is working. The Penguins are calling the June 10 event the “Student Flush,” a spinoff of their popular ticketing program known as “Student Rush.”

    Students already involved in the ticketing program can enter for a chance to win. Students must be 18 or older to participate in the flush-apalooza.

    In all, there will be 400 flushers, including some construction officials, on hand that day.[/quote]
    Didn’t Paul partake in this type of thing with the Citi… I mean… the “new Shea”?

  • LI Phil | June 1, 2010 at 5:50 pm |

    i really like ricko’s suggestion for the 2011 caps

    and they even match the twinkie colors

  • Ricko | June 1, 2010 at 5:57 pm |

    [quote comment=”392518″]i really like ricko’s suggestion for the 2011 caps

    and they even match the twinkie colors[/quote]

    Just use the regular hat logo. Logos like that one would be garish and look silly, unlike the hats of the previous years.
    (eyeroll)

    Let’s see a classic orange “NY” in there.
    Or an athletic gold “A’s”.

    —Ricko

  • LarryB | June 1, 2010 at 5:59 pm |

    Welcome back Paul. It had to have been a neat trip.

    Phil did a great job in the mean time.

    I noted on the Big Ten Network that they will have half hour shows about the 1957,1958,1965, seasons.I hope they have some color action. I look forward to the shows. Hope they have others in the future. I have seen some of the old SWC highlight shows and love them.

  • S. Bennett | June 1, 2010 at 6:12 pm |

    World Cup 2010 is just weeks away, but it’s never too soon for the 2014 Brazil logo:

    http://www.facebook....

  • LI Phil | June 1, 2010 at 6:37 pm |

    [quote comment=”392519″][quote comment=”392518″]i really like ricko’s suggestion for the 2011 caps

    and they even match the twinkie colors[/quote]

    Just use the regular hat logo. Logos like that one would be garish and look silly, unlike the hats of the previous years.
    (eyeroll)

    Let’s see a classic orange “NY” in there.
    Or an athletic gold “A’s”.

    —Ricko[/quote]

    here

    you can defile the a’s logo

  • LI Phil | June 1, 2010 at 6:59 pm |

    [quote comment=”392522″]
    here

    you can defile the a’s logo[/quote]

    ah…eff it…

    Q&D

  • Gusto44 | June 1, 2010 at 7:22 pm |

    [quote comment=”392520″]Welcome back Paul. It had to have been a neat trip.

    Phil did a great job in the mean time.

    I noted on the Big Ten Network that they will have half hour shows about the 1957,1958,1965, seasons.I hope they have some color action. I look forward to the shows. Hope they have others in the future. I have seen some of the old SWC highlight shows and love them.[/quote]

    Tomorrow at 8:30pm ET, it’s the debut episode of this series-1957. Check the BTN website program schedule for more info.

  • Terry D. | June 1, 2010 at 7:39 pm |

    I have a question for the UniWatch Forum (I can’t say “UniForum” at the risk of being cussed out by FUPP). I know that for most of us, softball jerseys in baseball are looked down upon, but what about certain situations? Like my high school, Palo Verde Valley in Blythe, CA (GRADUATED IN 2009). Before the 2010 return to Athletic Gold (Yellow), PV used Vegas Gold, including a home baseball jersey.

    http://www.maxpreps....

    http://www.maxpreps....

    I posted those pics because I think it’s rare to see a Vegas Gold jersey in ANY sport, let alone baseball. With exceptions to FSU Baseball,

    http://www.genedecke...

    New Orleans Saints (Old Gold)

    http://www.eauctionl...

    And Washington Wizards (Total Mess)

    http://product.image...

    In terms of Alt jersey justification, theres also the Cincinnati REDS

    http://www1.pictures...

    This was brought on by LI Phil’s post on red alts BTW. P.S, welcome back Paul.

  • LarryB | June 1, 2010 at 8:09 pm |

    [quote comment=”392524″][quote comment=”392520″]Welcome back Paul. It had to have been a neat trip.

    Phil did a great job in the mean time.

    I noted on the Big Ten Network that they will have half hour shows about the 1957,1958,1965, seasons.I hope they have some color action. I look forward to the shows. Hope they have others in the future. I have seen some of the old SWC highlight shows and love them.[/quote]

    Tomorrow at 8:30pm ET, it’s the debut episode of this series-1957. Check the BTN website program schedule for more info.[/quote]

    Interesting. The BTN guide has that it begins tonight with 1964 season. My Time Warner guide does not list it but I will set my dvr in case. I also noted some other years when I googled about it, Such as 1954 and 1971.

  • Gusto44 | June 1, 2010 at 8:10 pm |

    re: Philadelphia Phillies

    Couple of interesting questions about the uniforms of the Phillies. What’s the back story about the 1938 blue/gold one year experiment uniform? Are the Phils the only MLB club to never have their city name across the jersey?

  • Bernard | June 1, 2010 at 8:23 pm |

    Pirates are all high-pantsed again. Why are we not drooling over this?! Looks totally boss (way better than with the s&s caps yesterday).

  • JTH | June 1, 2010 at 9:23 pm |

    [quote comment=”392528″]Pirates are all high-pantsed again. Why are we not drooling over this?![/quote]
    Because it’s nothing new. Plenty of minor league teams go high-cuffed.

  • LI Phil | June 1, 2010 at 9:36 pm |

    [quote comment=”392529″][quote comment=”392528″]Pirates are all high-pantsed again. Why are we not drooling over this?![/quote]
    Because it’s nothing new. Plenty of minor league teams go high-cuffed.[/quote]
    ftw!

  • Jeremiah | June 1, 2010 at 9:41 pm |

    [quote comment=\”392436\”][quote comment=\”392435\”][quote comment=\”392428\”]not a knock on anyone, by the way, just seems that the \’true\’ meaning of some of our holidays has been lost over the past few decades.[/quote]

    No disagreement here. The overall lack of knowledge of, and appreciation for, history has turned Memorial Day and Independence Day into \”Support Our Troops\” Days. That concept is easy to grasp; we know about that because we see it every day on TV. The World Wars, Korea, Vietnam, the American Revolution? Oh, ick, that\’s history. Borrrrrring. And work.

    For example, does ANYBODY call it \”Independence Day\” anymore? No, it\’s \”Fourth of July,\” as if the reason everyone gets the day off is just to celebrate summer and watch fireworks.

    —Ricko[/quote]

    I still call it Independence Day. Like you said Ricko, by calling it the 4th of July, you cause it to lose its meaning.[/quote]

    I call it Independence Day as well. I teach my students to do that too. Very few of them know that’s what the day is really called. I usually tell them that every country has a fourth of July. That usually gets the conversation started.

  • Jeremiah | June 1, 2010 at 9:41 pm |

    [quote comment=”392529″][quote comment=”392528″]Pirates are all high-pantsed again. Why are we not drooling over this?![/quote]
    Because it’s nothing new. Plenty of minor league teams go high-cuffed.[/quote]

    That’s hilarious!

  • Ricko | June 1, 2010 at 10:01 pm |

    MOVIE ALERT.

    ROCKY just beginning on TCM.
    THE NATURAL is on 12:15 a.m. EDT.

    —Ricko

  • JimWa | June 1, 2010 at 10:13 pm |

    Just watched 61* for the first time. Lots of interesting uniform details held within. Time for that later, but for now, I point out the base cut out near third – pointed out by Paul a few days ago. I don’t know what the final conclusion was as to the current-day purpose, but – at least according to Billy Crystal – Yankee Stadium 1961/Tiger Stadium 1999 had it, too!

    http://www.flickr.co...

  • Bernard | June 1, 2010 at 10:48 pm |

    [quote comment=”392529″][quote comment=”392528″]Pirates are all high-pantsed again. Why are we not drooling over this?![/quote]
    Because it’s nothing new. Plenty of minor league teams go high-cuffed.[/quote]

    *sigh*

    Walked right into that one.

  • Gusto44 | June 1, 2010 at 11:07 pm |

    [quote comment=”392532″][quote comment=”392529″][quote comment=”392528″]Pirates are all high-pantsed again. Why are we not drooling over this?![/quote]
    Because it’s nothing new. Plenty of minor league teams go high-cuffed.[/quote]

    That’s hilarious![/quote]

    To be fair, the Bucs have a better record than six other clubs, and those six teams have combined to win as many world titles as the Pirates have won by themselves.

  • Clint W | June 1, 2010 at 11:30 pm |

    Brent Lillibridge got called up to the White Sox on Memorial Day, but his luggage got lost on the busy travel day:

    I’m wearing [Mark] Kotsay’s cleats and [Gordon] Beckham’s glove and hoping for the best. We’ll see if the bags show up before game time, but we’ll do whatever it takes.

    Lillibridge pinch-ran in the 9th in Tuesday’s game.

  • Chris from Carver | June 1, 2010 at 11:35 pm |

    [quote comment=”392484″][quote comment=”392470″]I call it Independence For Whites Only Day.

    The D.O.I. is an awkward read if you consider slavery.
    Of course, everyone knows that.[/quote]

    fair point marty…

    i guess you know this too…

    not all those who were involved in the DOI were pro-slavery; far from it…but like everything else we don’t always learn in school nowadays, it was more important to have the colonies united in their opposition to the crown, and compromise and dealmaking were the key … the north (almost united in its opposition to slavery) needed all of the southern colonies and failing that, there’d be no DOI to celebrate (or at least not on 7/4/1776)[/quote]
    Independence was declared from Great Britain on 2 July 1776. 4 July was when the wording of the DOI was voted on. TMYK [star shining]

  • LI Phil | June 1, 2010 at 11:52 pm |

    [quote comment=”392538″][quote comment=”392484″][quote comment=”392470″]I call it Independence For Whites Only Day.

    The D.O.I. is an awkward read if you consider slavery.
    Of course, everyone knows that.[/quote]

    fair point marty…

    i guess you know this too…

    not all those who were involved in the DOI were pro-slavery; far from it…but like everything else we don’t always learn in school nowadays, it was more important to have the colonies united in their opposition to the crown, and compromise and dealmaking were the key … the north (almost united in its opposition to slavery) needed all of the southern colonies and failing that, there’d be no DOI to celebrate (or at least not on 7/4/1776)[/quote]
    Independence was declared from Great Britain on 2 July 1776. 4 July was when the wording of the DOI was voted on. TMYK [star shining][/quote]

    i believe there was a bit of mead involved