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Uni Watch Profiles: Ryan Muraro

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How would you like to be a college undergrad and already have designed something that’ll be appearing in the Olympics? Or two things? That’s the case with Ryan Muraro, who, thanks to a lucky series of connections, ended up designing the suits worn by speed skater Phil Brojaka and by the Ukrainian speed skating team. He recently chatted with me about how he ended up in this unusual corner of uniform design.

Uni Watch: How old are you?

Ryan Muraro: I’m 21. I’m a junior in the industrial design program here at UW Stout.

UW: Do you have a specialty in terms of the kinds of designs you do, whether it’s furniture or packaging or whatever?

RM: I kind of run the gamut right now, because I haven’t found a niche. I originally came here because I wanted to be a car designer. But that’s probably not gonna work out, because there are so many car design schools. I enjoyed doing a lot of furniture last semester, and I also like doing athletic apparel. I’ve got to say, though, I really like doing chairs.

UW: Yeah, you sent me some photos of a pretty interesting chair design.

RM: My suspension chair? Yeah, that one gets some pretty weird feedback.

UW: Tell me more about that.

RM: The whole point of it was that I wanted to make a chair that was kind of egotistical, like you had to pay attention to it.

UW: The chair itself is egotistical, or just the person sitting in it?

RM: The chair itself — and also its creator. The other day I was showing it to one of my friends. She kind of jumped onto it and almost flew off to the side! People compare it to a claw game, a bear trap.

UW: What grade did you get on it?

RM: Technically, I got a B-plus, but it was a week late, and the teacher said he docked me a full letter grade because of that.

UW: So it would’ve been an A-plus.

RM: Yeah!

UW: OK, enough about chairs. Growing up, were you always a big sports fan?

RM: Yeah. And I played Little League baseball. I didn’t wear stirrups, though — sorry.

UW: That’s OK. In an e-mail you sent me earlier, you said you’ve basically wanted to be an artist or designer since you were very young, because you figured out at an early age that you could draw well, right?

RM: Yeah. But at the start I wanted to be a cartoonist, or an illustrator. But then I started to want to design actual things. At first I wanted to design airplanes, but then I realized that’s more of an engineering thing. Then I wanted to be an architect, but I figured that required too much math. So then I worked my way back to product design.

UW: So when you were a kid, were you combining your interests in art and sports? Did you doodle logos and uniforms and such?

RM: Oh, yeah. When I was in fifth grade, I entered a Campbell’s Soup contest. It was a bunch of anniversaries all converging — the 10th anniversary of Andy Warhol’s death, and the 25th anniversary of his Campbell’s Soup can paintings, or something like that. I don’t remember all the details. Anyway, they held this drawing contest for kids, and I entered, and what I did was a Green Bay Packer catching a ball, only he’s thinking the ball is a Campbell’s Soup can. And I won third prize.

UW: OK, now let’s talk about these speed skating suits you’ve designed. First of all, were you even a speed skating fan before this whole thing went down?

RM: No. I’d watch it in the Olympics, I guess, and then not care about it any other time.

UW: Can you even skate?

RM: Yes, although I didn’t actually learn how to do that until high school.

UW: Had you ever done apparel design before taking on this project?

RM: I’d do random sketches of uniforms, but that’s it. I’ve done a couple of sports logos, though — one for the Stillwater High School lacrosse team, and one for the St. Paul Stars synchronized swimming team. I don’t have that one anymore, though.

UW: Did you burn all the evidence so nobody would know you were associated with something as lame as synchro swimming?

RM: Kind of. If you want to edit that out of this interview, that’d be fine with me.

UW: How’d you get connected with Philip Brojaka, the speed skater dude?

RM: My sister was working at the Petit National Ice Center outside of Milwaukee, which is one of the two U.S. training facilities for speed skaters — the other one’s in Salt Lake City. My sister basically had a gopher job, meaning she had to shadow the skaters.

UW: What do you mean, “shadow”?

RM: Escort them around town, keep them occupied, make sure they’re on schedule so they don’t miss their heats, that sort of thing. And one day she had to do this for this Phil Brojaka guy, who was training there. And they hit it off and they’ve been dating ever since.

UW: But Phil isn’t American, right?

RM: His background is Ukrainian, but he was born in England and he skates for the British team.

UW: But he was training at the American facility?

RM: Great Britain doesn’t really have any long-track speed skating history. Phil holds all the records, but they’ve only been keeping them since, like, 1991. He says he always had to compete with the curling team for ice time, so that’s why he came over here to train.

UW: So they hit it off and started dating — and when was that?

RM: The fall of 2006.

UW: And they’re still dating now.

RM: Yes.

UW: And how good is he? Like, is he going to the Olympics?

RM: Yeah. He’s really good.

UW: And how’d he end up coming to you to design his suit?

RM: He was originally a short-track skater, and short-track suits are different than long-track. They have kneepads and stuff. He didn’t have a long-track suit, and he was borrowing them from other skaters. Anyway, he has an agent, this guy named Sander, who sets up sponsorships for him and stuff like that, and he got Kia to agree to sponsor Phil if he put up a World Cup qualifying time.

UW: Kia, the car company?

RM: Yeah. They’re a big speed skating sponsor. And part of the sponsorship agreement was that he’d be able to get his own suit. And he could pick his own designer, but he’d have to pay for the design, so my sister told him to come to me.

UW: So when did he approach you? Or was it your sister who approached you?

RM: It was both of them, in a joint phone call, which was somewhat awkward.

UW: And when was this?

RM: January of 2007.

UW: Did he give you any guidance in terms of his likes and dislikes and so on? Did he spell out any preferences?

RM: Absolutely not. I was asking him different things, asking if there were other suits he liked that he wanted me to base his design on, and he said no. He gave me free reign, because he wanted it to be completely original.

UW: Did he even look at your portfolio first, to make sure he thought you were a good designer?

RM: Nope. He just took my sister’s word for it.

UW: Did he, or anyone else, pay you for this?

RM: No. I just got a piece for my portfolio.

UW: So what kind of research did you do? Did you go on YouTube and start looking at lots of speed skating video to get a feel for the way the suits typically look? Did you try on any speed skating suits yourself?

RM: No, none of that. He said he wanted it to be totally original, so I didn’t look at anything speedkating-related. I did look at other things, like the British flag, Chelsea kits [the EPL team], because at the time I thought he was a Chelsea fan.

UW: So you didn’t want any preconceived notions about speed skating. You kept your mind pure and unbiased.

RM: Yes.

UW: Did you know what company would end up executing your design?

RM: No. All I knew was that I was doing it for Phil, and I figured he’d be handling the logistics.

UW: Did he give you a template, or any information on fabrics or dyes or anything like that?

RM: Oh, no. None of that came up until about nine months later, when it was time for the suit to go into production.

UW: OK, so all you were dealing with was the graphics. What kind of thinking went into your design choices?

RM: I wanted to keep it pretty close to the British colors — red, blue, and white. And then I thought it would be good to introduce one additional color, silver. So I had a basic color pallet, and then I created basic templates for the front and back view, and then I started doing sketches. I tried about 20 ideations [the first eight of which are shown here, here, here, and here], and he ended up picking the first one, which made me wonder why I bothered doing the other 19.

UW: How long did all of this take?

RM: I did it within a night.

UW: One night?!

RM: I don’t really sleep, Paul. I just stayed up and sketched and sketched until I couldn’t think of anything more, and then I scanned them and sent them to him.

UW: So then what happened?

RM: It basically sat on the shelf for nine months until he got that World Cup qualifying time, because until then the sponsor wouldn’t pay to have the suit made.

UW: And once he got the qualifying time, what happened after that?

RM: I was put in contacet with Sander, the agent guy. He forwarded the design to the manufacturer, which was Lorini — they make cycling suits as well as speed skating suits. And they said they liked the design, but it wouldn’t work at all.

UW: Why not?

RM: On speed skating suits, they use different materials in different areas, depending on friction and stuff —

UW: In other words, all those things I was asking you about a few minutes ago, which I guess it would’ve been good for you to have known about beforehand.

RM: Yeah. Phil didn’t really know about it either. Anyway, they sent me this diagram that showed all the zones where I couldn’t have any graphics or color changes — from the knees to the stomach area, and from the top of the shoulders to across the chest. And I could only use four specific colors in those areas: black, dark blue, marine blue, or red.

UW: Because those areas use a particular fabric?

RM: It’s not even fabric, really — it’s like this rubber compound. It’s strange stuff. Anyway, in those areas they can have a solid color, but they can’t print a graphic. Except for the sponsor logo, oddly.

UW: Hmmm, interesting. Was Phil disappointed?

RM: At first, yeah.

UW: So did you have to revise your design, or did any of those other 19 concepts fit into the guidelines they gave you?

RM: I thought about going back to one of those earlier designs, but I decided to revise the one Phil liked and make it fit within the parameters they set.

UW: And then you were good to go?

RM: Almost. Instead of using the version I provided, they had me create a “flat” version that would show how the suit would look if it was lying flat.

UW: And once that was all settled, how long did it take to go from art to part?

RM: About a month.

UW: And did they literally make just one of these?

RM: Yes, there’s only one.

UW: And what does that cost?

RM: I have no idea, and I don’t really want to know.

UW: And by now, Phil has worn it in competition, right?

RM: Yes, I’ve seen video of him, and I’ve got plenty of photos.

UW: Were you nervous the first time he put it on?

RM: I was nervous the first time he got it. They added some moisture-wicking side panels that ended up changing some of the graphics, so I was worried he wouldn’t like that, but he ended up loving it. Although I’m still slightly bitter about it myself.

UW: Have you actually been present for any competitions in which he’s worn this suit?

RM: No. I have seen the suit in person, but not during a race.

UW: What does your sister think of it?

RM: She likes it.

UW: Would you say this whole process has enhanced or strained your relationship with her?

RM: I don’t think it’s done anything one way or the other. But I think it’s helped my relationship with Phil, because it gives us something to talk about.

UW: If you had to do this whole thing over again, would you do anything differently?

RM: I would like to have known about those side panels, because they ended up changing my design. But I took those into account when I designed the Ukrainian suits.

UW: Let’s talk about that. How did you get that gig?

RM: Sander came back to me and said he liked what I did for Phil and wanted me to do more designs. It was kind of a short schedule, because the World Cups were about to happen.

UW: When was this?

RM: Last fall.

UW: Was this also for free?

RM: Yeah, because the Ukrainians don’t have a lot of money. But at the time I was thrilled, because I really enjoyed doing Phil’s suit. So sure, why not?

UW: Is there a connection that Phil comes from Ukrainian heritage, and then you end up doing the design for the Ukrainian team?

RM: No, that’s a complete coincidence. The only connection is that Sander is involved with Phil and with the Ukrainians.

UW: Why did the Ukrainians want their old design replaced?

RM: They had that one for a couple of years and they were just ready for a new one.

UW: And how many Ukrainians will be wearing the design you did for them?

RM: Technically, it’s the entire team. But I’ve seen photos of two different skaters, and that could be the whole team right there.

UW: And did they give you any design parameters for this one?

RM: No, again, I was on my own. Except this time I knew about those areas where I couldn’t have graphics or color changes.

UW: So they just turned you loose.

RM: Yeah. I probably shouldn’t get too used to this, because that’s not how it works out in the professional realm, but I’m gonna milk this one as long as I can. I like the freedom.

UW: So how many versions did you do for the Ukrainians?

RM: I only did five ideations, then I picked the one I liked best and did a few color options for it. Then I sent it to Sander [along with the flat version] and figured he’d come back with some requests for changes. But by the next time I heard from him, they already had it in production!

UW: And was this another one-nighter?

RM: Yeah, just a couple of hours. I work really fast.

UW: How would you feel if one of the Ukrainians was wearing your suit against Phil? Would you be conflicted?

RM: No, I’d be rooting for Phil.

UW: And what if either Phil or the Ukrainians are skating against the Americans.

RM: Hmmm. I’d definitely root for Phil, but I’m not sure about the Ukrainians. I just wouldn’t want them to make asses of themselves. Maybe they could just lose by a hair

UW: Has this whole experience made you more of a speed skating fan?

RM: Yeah, I’m actually keeping track of it now, mainly because it’s possible that I might do more designs for Sander, so I want to stay in touch with the sport.

UW: Do you think this could end up being a new career avenue?

RM: It seems like unless you’re working for Nike, you don’t make much money on these things. So I don’t know.

UW: Don’t you think it’s weird that speed skaters don’t wear socks? I mean, I know the skates are specially custom-molded to fit their feet and all, but it makes me uncomfortable just looking at it.

RM: Yeah. That’s probably why I didn’t take up speed skating myself.

========

Yeah, I knew there was a reason I never took up speed skating either…. Anyway, big thanks to Ryan for sharing his story.

Uni Watch News Ticker: Thanks to everyone who explained that the number on Dave Brown’s hip in this photo is the Seahawks’ 10th-anniversary logo (also visible here). This logo isn’t shown on Football Uniforms Past and Present, which makes this another reminder that we shouldn’t rely on such sites as the last word on uni history. … Here’s a new one: punishment by uni number. … And here’s yet another new one: changing your uni number due to adverse fan reaction. … Speaking of uni numbers: The Mets have put a countdown tracker on the outfield wall, counting down the number of games remaining at Shea. Prior to each game, someone gets to pull down the previous day’s number to reveal the new number (it’s currently at 74). Last night, play-by-play radio man Howie Rose mentioned that as the numbers get down into the range that includes baseball uni numbers, the team will have former Mets players remove the numbers associated with their uniforms. In other words, Tom Seaver will probably get to pull down the 41, Jerry Koosman will no doubt pull down the 36, and so on. Steven Colbert held up a Philly mashup jersey the other day. … Glenn Stern reports that Texas A&M’s practice jerseys now have NOBs –with huge lettering. “This is the first time the practice jerseys have had names,” he says. “The only thing I can figure is that the new coaching staff needed some help keeping track of all the players and learning their names.” … The minor league Kansas City T-Bones will be wearing prison-striped jerseys on May 28th. Why? Michael Vick Welcome to the Neighborhood Night (Vick’s prison is 15 minutes away from the T-Bones’ park). … The visiting clubhouse at the Trop has a hat stretcher (with thanks to Doug Simpson). … Peter Kaszczak forwarded a particularly nauseating case of logo creep. … The much-discussed blog Stuff White People Like (discussed primarily because its editor just landed a huge-ass book deal) has finally weighed in on uniforms (with thanks to Jonathon Binet). … Major milestone in this week’s New Yorker: this cartoon, which I believe marks the first instance of a NYer cartoon showing a baseball player with low-cuffed pants. … What’s the deal with that shadow on the Staples Center court? … This company appears to be a soccer version of Ebbets Field Flannels (as forwarded by Peter Kurilecz). … PBS’s excellent The American Experience series will air a Roberto Clemente documentary next Monday night. Man, check out the texture on that undershirt — I love that. … The Louisiana-Monroe baseball team will wear camouflage jerseys on April 29th for “Military Night” (with thanks to Chris Mycoskie). … Remember Packers seamstress Marge Switzer? Here’s another “team”-specific seamstress, of a more disturbing bent (fascinating find by Hugh C. McBride). … The Twins almost didn’t get to tribute Jackie Robinson on Tuesday, because their 42 jerseys were sent to Minneapolis instead of Detroit. Fortunately, equipment manager Rod McCormick managed to improvise — full details (plus info on third base coach Scott Ullger burning a hole in his pants) here (with thanks to Karl Anderson and Jon Marthaler). … “That’s Deion Sanders on the left,” says Greg Riffenburgh. “He’s wearing a pair of Nike’s football cleats on the baseball field, though I’m sure they were customized (metal spikes instead of replaceable conical cleats) for the diamond.” … This trend of giving jerseys to coaches is so lame (with thanks to Anthony Congi). … Josh Homan reports that Adidas has come out with a new lacrosse stick, the AdiStrike, complete with lots of triple-striped details. … Max Weder wrote in to mention that the cover of last fall’s Ebbets Field Flannels catalog was painted by his wife, Jennifer Ettinger. A gallery of her baseball-related work, which features lovingly detailed uniform elements, is available here, and you can see some of her hockey, golf, and other paintings on her web site. … Pretty amazing sneaker site here (with thanks to Don Montgomery). … Rare photo here of Stick Michael in a Bosox uni — he never actually played for them, although he was went to spring training with them in 1976. That photo is yet another gem from Steve Dewing’s mind-blowingly great photo site. Speaking of which, Steve says, “The Expos had the whitest home uniforms, followed closely by the Dodgers” — a reference to the slightly off-white hue of most pre-polyester uniforms. … Here’s yet another insight from Steve’s collection: You probably know that the 1973 Pirates wore a “21” sleeve patch in memory of Roberto Clemente. What you might not know, however, is that they wore a completely different memorial during spring training: a black rectangle, which looks like it was affixed with Velcro. That last photo also shows a bygone protocol: a catcher keeping his shinguards on while on deck with two outs. That was a fairly common sight in the ’70s, kids. … In volleyball, the libero usually wears a contrasting jersey. But Jeremy Brahm has found something different: a libero wearing a colored bib. “I’ve never seen this before,” he says. “It’s supposedly from the 1996 World Grand Prix, but the libero was only adopted by the FIVB in 1998, so maybe this was a trial in a tournament.” … Chad Moeller wears No. 19, so why does his catcher’s helmet have No. 6? (Screen grab courtesy of Michael Romero.)

 

130 comments to Uni Watch Profiles: Ryan Muraro

  • Southern Fried Yankee | April 17, 2008 at 8:10 am |

    Chad Moeller’s helmet may have a “6” on it, but if you look closely it is NOT centered, meaning that it looks like there is a digit missing, therefore I am not sure whose helmet that would have been

  • Southern Fried Yankee | April 17, 2008 at 8:15 am |

    I have question too…i was looking at that Steve Dewing website and looked at all the baseball card pictures and noticed something interesting. Now this maybe b/c I am in the mindset of the 21st Century, (Cell Phones, Computers, Internet) But it seems ALL Baseball cards of players were photographed at Yankee or Shea Stadiums. Why is that I wonder? Was it b/c TOPPS was HQ’ed in NYC? Personally I think it is facinating!

  • Kek | April 17, 2008 at 8:24 am |

    Regarding the ticker item on A&M and NOB of practice jerseys…. haven’t the Aggies’ staff ever heard of the time old tradition of a piece of tape across the front the helmet with the player’s last name in marker?!?! One would think that would be more cost effective!!!!

    Do they have a lot of duplicate numbers on the squad that names would be easier than the coaches having rosters handy?

  • Al | April 17, 2008 at 8:29 am |

    Heck with the prison jerseys … what are the Redneck Night jerseys going to look like?

  • ESS | April 17, 2008 at 8:44 am |

    Interesting article. It looks like Ryan “Gets It”…especially in the flat version of the Ukraine suit where he points out that the side panels WILL line up!

  • ChrisM70 | April 17, 2008 at 9:00 am |

    That British speed skating outfit reminded me of this…

    http://z.about.com/d...

  • LI Phil | April 17, 2008 at 9:09 am |

    [quote]Speaking of uni numbers: The Mets have put a countdown tracker on the outfield wall, counting down the number of games remaining at Shea.[/quote]

    it’s not just a number counter, it’s the lincoln-mercury mets countdown…and…

    it’s BLACK (you can see it over willie’s shoulder)

    …sigh

  • Bill E. | April 17, 2008 at 9:16 am |

    I think the shadow on the Staple Center court is from the strobes used by the photographers.
    I hope Howie Rose gets to take down one of the Shea numbers…

  • Joey Guns | April 17, 2008 at 9:20 am |

    Speaking of uni numbers: The Mets have put a countdown tracker on the outfield wall, counting down the number of games remaining at Shea. Prior to each game, someone gets to pull down the previous day’s number to reveal the new number (it’s currently at 74). Last night, play-by-play radio man Howie Rose mentioned that as the numbers get down into the range that includes baseball uni numbers, the team will have former Mets players remove the numbers associated with their uniforms. In other words, Tom Seaver will probably get to pull down the 41, Jerry Koosman will no doubt pull down the 36, and so on.

    That’s nothing new. The Cardinals did that same thing in the final year of Busch Stadium in 2005.

    Here’s a list of people who pulled each number off the wall:

    http://www.cardsclub...

    Interesting note: Ken Griffey Jr. pulled #77…..

  • sharck | April 17, 2008 at 9:27 am |

    Ryan- with all due respect, it appears that all you did was “decorate” rather than design. Short track is a technical sport that requires a balance of performance and protection, neither of which you mentioned. You mention nothing of heat regulation, body articulation or kevlar protected “cut-zones.” You even mention that you “…didn’t look at anything speedkating-related.” An educated designer would never make such an ignorant statement, which is surprising because you would never design a “suspension chair” (which is cool) without a basic understanding of how a chair is constructed, developed and manufactured. All you’re showing is how to color-up a template and unfortunately the graphics fail to move with the body or promote the emotion, agression and speed of short track. It would have been more interesting to learn about the sport from an inside design point of view and less about how many color versions you decorated in one night. Cheers…

  • Kim | April 17, 2008 at 9:42 am |

    [quote comment=”253444″]Ryan- with all due respect, it appears that all you did was “decorate” rather than design. Short track is a technical sport that requires a balance of performance and protection, neither of which you mentioned. You mention nothing of heat regulation, body articulation or kevlar protected “cut-zones.” You even mention that you “…didn’t look at anything speedkating-related.” An educated designer would never make such an ignorant statement, which is surprising because you would never design a “suspension chair” (which is cool) without a basic understanding of how a chair is constructed, developed and manufactured. All you’re showing is how to color-up a template and unfortunately the graphics fail to move with the body or promote the emotion, agression and speed of short track. It would have been more interesting to learn about the sport from an inside design point of view and less about how many color versions you decorated in one night. Cheers…[/quote]

    Thanks for being the first ‘wet blanket’ post of the day.

    I would have loved to have given Ryan a crack at ‘coloring up’ a RBK NHL template, as various ‘professionals’ screwed that up.

  • Fran | April 17, 2008 at 9:42 am |

    [quote comment=”253444″]Ryan- with all due respect, it appears that all you did was “decorate” rather than design. Short track is a technical sport that requires a balance of performance and protection, neither of which you mentioned. You mention nothing of heat regulation, body articulation or kevlar protected “cut-zones.” [/quote]

    If you had read the post you would have noted he was designing a long track suit

  • Max | April 17, 2008 at 9:51 am |

    Are the SF Giants using a small drop-shadow orange trim on their numbers this season?

  • u2horn | April 17, 2008 at 9:59 am |

    If U.Michigan ever needs to outfit a speed skating team, Ryan is their man!

  • Joey Guns | April 17, 2008 at 10:06 am |

    [quote comment=”253413″]Chad Moeller’s helmet may have a “6” on it, but if you look closely it is NOT centered, meaning that it looks like there is a digit missing, therefore I am not sure whose helmet that would have been[/quote]

    You’re right. I’m sure it’s Jose Molina’s extra helmet, that had the “2” peeled off.

    http://newyork.yanke...

  • interlockingtc | April 17, 2008 at 10:13 am |

    It’s interviews like today’s that make Uniwatch the treat that it is: A young student designer has an opportunity fall in his lap through his sister’s boyfriend’s search for a speedskating uniform…and he succeeds. And we are in on the minute details. Great story.

  • LI Phil | April 17, 2008 at 10:17 am |

    [quote]Ryan-with all due respect, it appears that all you did was “decorate” rather than design….Cheers…[/quote]

    sharck…with all due respect…lets see your designs

    dude’s 21 years old, and i thought that was pretty fckn sweet…better than anything 99% of us can do

    cheers

  • Perry | April 17, 2008 at 10:18 am |

    That’s funny, I hadn’t noticed that catchers were no longer coming to the on-deck circle with shin guards on with two out. I do remember that in the 70s, when it was common, Johnny Bench didn’t do it. When asked why, he said he wanted to show confidence that the guy at bat was going to get a hit.

  • B Johnson | April 17, 2008 at 10:20 am |

    Found a good photo gallery in the middle of this page

  • B Johnson | April 17, 2008 at 10:21 am |

    Whoops forgot the link.

  • B Johnson | April 17, 2008 at 10:23 am |

    Damn, forgot it again. Here.

  • Southern Fried Yankee | April 17, 2008 at 10:25 am |

    [quote comment=”253461″]That’s funny, I hadn’t noticed that catchers were no longer coming to the on-deck circle with shin guards on with two out. I do remember that in the 70s, when it was common, Johnny Bench didn’t do it. When asked why, he said he wanted to show confidence that the guy at bat was going to get a hit.[/quote]

    I remember when I used to catch in HS and such, I always had the “junk” (shinguards) on with 2 outs in the on deck circle and this was in the early 1990s! Of course sometimes if I then went up to bat after the guy got on with 2 outs, I would forget they were on and step in with them on…

    I like Bench’s thinking though.

  • scott | April 17, 2008 at 10:40 am |

    [quote comment=”253461″]That’s funny, I hadn’t noticed that catchers were no longer coming to the on-deck circle with shin guards on with two out. I do remember that in the 70s, when it was common, Johnny Bench didn’t do it. When asked why, he said he wanted to show confidence that the guy at bat was going to get a hit.[/quote]

    Boy, I thought catchers still did this…

  • Kim | April 17, 2008 at 10:44 am |

    [quote comment=”253467″][quote comment=”253461″]That’s funny, I hadn’t noticed that catchers were no longer coming to the on-deck circle with shin guards on with two out. I do remember that in the 70s, when it was common, Johnny Bench didn’t do it. When asked why, he said he wanted to show confidence that the guy at bat was going to get a hit.[/quote]

    I remember when I used to catch in HS and such, I always had the “junk” (shinguards) on with 2 outs in the on deck circle and this was in the early 1990s! Of course sometimes if I then went up to bat after the guy got on with 2 outs, I would forget they were on and step in with them on…
    [/quote]

    If it make you feel any better, I often did the same thing.

  • Steve | April 17, 2008 at 10:45 am |

    [quote comment=”253471″][quote comment=”253461″]That’s funny, I hadn’t noticed that catchers were no longer coming to the on-deck circle with shin guards on with two out. I do remember that in the 70s, when it was common, Johnny Bench didn’t do it. When asked why, he said he wanted to show confidence that the guy at bat was going to get a hit.[/quote]

    Boy, I thought catchers still did this…[/quote]

    You really did? Catchers always sit in the dugout with them on, but I don’t think I’ve seen a catcher in the on deck circle with shin guards in at least 15 years!

  • Nathan | April 17, 2008 at 10:49 am |

    AOl Sports has a photo gallery of facial hair in baseball, sort of a quiz

    Here

  • Stuby | April 17, 2008 at 10:51 am |

    [quote comment=”253442″]Speaking of uni numbers: The Mets have put a countdown tracker on the outfield wall, counting down the number of games remaining at Shea. Prior to each game, someone gets to pull down the previous day’s number to reveal the new number (it’s currently at 74). Last night, play-by-play radio man Howie Rose mentioned that as the numbers get down into the range that includes baseball uni numbers, the team will have former Mets players remove the numbers associated with their uniforms. In other words, Tom Seaver will probably get to pull down the 41, Jerry Koosman will no doubt pull down the 36, and so on.

    That’s nothing new.

    The Cardinals did that same thing in the final year of Busch Stadium in 2005.

    Here’s a list of people who pulled each number off the wall:

    http://www.cardsclub...

    Interesting note:

    Ken Griffey Jr. pulled #77…..[/quote]
    Interesting in that he usually pulls his hamstring.

  • lwiedy | April 17, 2008 at 10:53 am |

    [quote comment=”253465″]Damn, forgot it again. Here.[/quote]

    Re: Photo #2
    Didn’t anyone ever teach that guy to catch a baseball with two hands?

  • LI Phil | April 17, 2008 at 10:54 am |

    [quote comment=”253479″][quote comment=”253442″]Interesting note:

    Ken Griffey Jr. pulled #77…..[/quote]
    Interesting in that he usually pulls his hamstring.[/quote]

    thanks stuby…i needed a chuckle this am!

  • Matt D. | April 17, 2008 at 10:55 am |

    [quote comment=”253442″]Speaking of uni numbers: The Mets have put a countdown tracker on the outfield wall, counting down the number of games remaining at Shea. Prior to each game, someone gets to pull down the previous day’s number to reveal the new number (it’s currently at 74). Last night, play-by-play radio man Howie Rose mentioned that as the numbers get down into the range that includes baseball uni numbers, the team will have former Mets players remove the numbers associated with their uniforms. In other words, Tom Seaver will probably get to pull down the 41, Jerry Koosman will no doubt pull down the 36, and so on.[\quote]

    I love the idea, but should Mookie be the one to tear down the number at the last regular season (let’s hope not the last game)game?
    If you check Mets By The Numbers, you get a pretty good idea who’s up for this.

  • Matt D. | April 17, 2008 at 10:57 am |

    oops – Closong every link possible

  • Like the river | April 17, 2008 at 10:58 am |

    Just to give everyone a heads up, THE Ohio State Buckeyes in thier spring practice tomorrow will be wearing a memorial sticker on the side of their with the letters “DS” on it for Dianna Sharp. she was a crossing guard who was killed last week.

    That Sandy Alomar jr.(my fav player of all time) picture is freaking great. not a bad picture of Joe C. on that site too with the big foam cowboy hat and the sweet goodwill style t-shirt!

  • Kek | April 17, 2008 at 10:59 am |

    [quote comment=”253473″][quote comment=”253471″][quote comment=”253461″]That’s funny, I hadn’t noticed that catchers were no longer coming to the on-deck circle with shin guards on with two out. I do remember that in the 70s, when it was common, Johnny Bench didn’t do it. When asked why, he said he wanted to show confidence that the guy at bat was going to get a hit.[/quote]

    Boy, I thought catchers still did this…[/quote]

    You really did?

    Catchers always sit in the dugout with them on, but I don’t think I’ve seen a catcher in the on deck circle with shin guards in at least 15 years![/quote]
    I guess this is one of those things that just stopped happening and no one ever noticed it. You mention it now and I’m like “yeah, you’re right, they don’t do that anymore”.

    I did this as a player, but I never went to back with my gear on. I do have a funny story about a counterpart though. We were playing a summer league game against a team that pretty much did it catcher-by-committee. This guy makes the third out of the inning and out of habit from his days playing the field, hollers out “somebody pick me up.”

    One of the backups dutifully brought every piece of catcher’s equipment out to the patch of grass to the left of the plate and warmed up the pitcher while the catcher, red-faced with embarassment, put all his gear on….right there in the spot the backup put it on the ground.

    Needless to say both teams and the umpires had a good laugh at that one.

  • Like the river | April 17, 2008 at 11:05 am |

    it will be on the side of their helmet sorry, very odd that they are putting it supposedly on the side of the helmet, usually they put all the memorial stickers on the back of the helmet “#24, #99)

  • Hex | April 17, 2008 at 11:06 am |

    New Test and One day/Twenty20 uniforms for the England cricket team were revealed today.

    I’m not impressed, and I’m especially horrified by the adidas shoulder stripes.

  • Marty Met | April 17, 2008 at 11:10 am |

    [quote comment=”253478″]AOl Sports has a photo gallery of facial hair in baseball, sort of a quiz

    Here[/quote]

    Great a photo of George Foster as a member of the Mets. My day is ruined.

  • Kek | April 17, 2008 at 11:12 am |

    Another thing on catchers and not coming to the on-deck circle with their shinguards on: this could be a by-product of TV. With more and more games, the great majority, on some form of tv/radio/internet, the breaks between innings cause more down time. It’s odd that things like this would somehow just stop.

    Growing up in Western PA and being a catcher, as a young-un I was a big fan of Tony Pena. This brings up another topic. I remember if he had an off day, when he sat in the dugout he would still wear his flapless helmet as his cap. This always stuck out because this was the era when the Buccos still sported the yellow batting helmet with the black bill. I clearly remember a game when Pena played first base and it was such a shock to see him in the black pillbox hat. I was the first time I ever remembered seeing him wear it (although I’m sure he wore it on team photos).

    In today’s game, I was guess that most if not all catchers wear the team’s regular cap on off-days. In fact, Pena may have been the anomally back then and been the only one to do this.

    A final note catchers, gear, unis, etc. The last catcher I can remember with regularity as one that wore a backwards cap under their mask rather than a helmet was the O’s Rick Dempsey. Was there someone around that time or after him? Also, is there a rule now that states a catcher must wear a helmet. Also, I’m not counting any of the catchers that wear caps under the hockey goalie masks, I’m referring to the cap being the only gear under the mask.

    And was there some sort of advantage to the bill being bent upwards on the catchers that used to wear them?

  • Matt B | April 17, 2008 at 11:16 am |

    Too bad they switched the shade of blue on the UK uniform to royal blue. The navy in the drawings looked much better, IMO.

  • Hex | April 17, 2008 at 11:26 am |

    Better pictures of the new england cricket uniforms here.

  • Graham | April 17, 2008 at 11:27 am |

    My guess on the shadow on the court at Staples is that it is a mounted camera flash. At many sporting events camera flashes are set up in the rafters to illuminate the “action areas” of the surface. The flashes are fired by a wireless transmitter that is attached to the flash shoe of a camera. This allows those ice-level shots (in hockey, particularly) to be properly exposed, and allowing to shoot at a higher shutter speed (important, since hockey moves so fast). I’ve seen this quite a lot here at Rexall place (home of the Oilers) and I’d bed it’s the same deal for Kobe in LA.

    Don’t take my word for it. Watch an NHL playoff game on TV here and you will visibly see a camera flash white-out/blank the screen, particularly during goal-mouth scrambles. This can’t be a regular consumer flash because they are not nearly powerful to white-out the picture (as evidenced when you see crowd shots with the little dinky pips that a consumer flash makes).

  • Free Vick | April 17, 2008 at 11:29 am |

    [quote comment=”253458″][quote]Ryan-with all due respect, it appears that all you did was “decorate” rather than design….Cheers…[/quote]

    sharck…with all due respect…lets see your designs

    dude’s 21 years old, and i thought that was pretty fckn sweet…better than anything 99% of us can do

    cheers[/quote]

    Well, that’s because 99% of us don’t (or aren’t going to) do this for a living. If formal training in design, uniform or otherwise, is a prerequisite for having an opinion about it, then why don’t you level the same criticism at this entire site? Do you ask Paul how good his designs are before you allow him to critique the Rockies’ purple jerseys?

  • Paul Lukas | April 17, 2008 at 11:38 am |

    [quote comment=”253493″]The last catcher I can remember with regularity as one that wore a backwards cap under their mask rather than a helmet was the O’s Rick Dempsey. Was there someone around that time or after him? Also, is there a rule now that states a catcher must wear a helmet.[/quote]

    There is indeed such a rule, and Dempsey was indeed the last grandfathered catcher to go helmetless.

    Another thing about that Milt May photo: It used to be fairly common to see players kneeling in the on-deck circle (sometimes while taking practice swings, sometimes just kinda watching). You never see that anymore.

  • My Name is Not Earl | April 17, 2008 at 11:41 am |

    That shadow at Staples is puzzling. I know that for Lakers home games, they darken the lights over the crowd and keep the lights on over the court. But I thought the Clippers didn’t do that. And that shadow probably has nothing to do with the lighting scheme anyway

  • Paul P | April 17, 2008 at 11:46 am |

    Is it just me, or does the whole Shea countdown thing seem like they’re kind of giving up on the season. It’s like saying “Hey Mets fans, 76 more games here, because we’re probably going to let you down again and not more the playoffs!” I mean I get it, it’s all about pomp and circumstance, but at the same time it seems to send a message of giving up on the season even though that is obviously not their intention.

  • Kim | April 17, 2008 at 11:47 am |

    [quote comment=”253500″][quote comment=”253458″][quote]Ryan-with all due respect, it appears that all you did was “decorate” rather than design….Cheers…[/quote]

    sharck…with all due respect…lets see your designs

    dude’s 21 years old, and i thought that was pretty fckn sweet…better than anything 99% of us can do

    cheers[/quote]

    Well, that’s because 99% of us don’t (or aren’t going to) do this for a living. If formal training in design, uniform or otherwise, is a prerequisite for having an opinion about it, then why don’t you level the same criticism at this entire site? Do you ask Paul how good his designs are before you allow him to critique the Rockies’ purple jerseys?[/quote]

    I think the whole point is that Ryan isn’t a pro either. He did it for free for a friend, and that led to another opportunity. None of which were for money, just something to put into his portfolio.

    It was senseless of someone to come on here and hose an amateur designer that got an opporunity at doing something cool, something that I bet a lot of armchair designers on here would like to have a crack at once.

  • Shawn Knowles | April 17, 2008 at 11:52 am |

    Paul,
    Not wearing socks with skates is actually pretty common in hockey as well … its just impossible to see. Unless of course someone were to take their skate off in a fight and try to cut someone with it…

    Anyways, it’s a comfort thing, people who don’t wear socks have a better feeling in their skates, and although they smell a LOT worse after, the sweat actually makes the boot feel more like a slipper, than a hard boot.

  • Ian K | April 17, 2008 at 11:55 am |

    [quote comment=”253442″]

    The Cardinals did that same thing in the final year of Busch Stadium in 2005.

    Here’s a list of people who pulled each number off the wall:

    http://www.cardsclub...

    Interesting note:

    Ken Griffey Jr. pulled #77…..[/quote]

    I like #71, Bob Uecker. “Actor” is listed first, before Cards catcher or Brewers broadcaster. Is that really his most well known career?

  • Paul P | April 17, 2008 at 11:56 am |

    We talk about pajama bottoms all the time with players like Manny & such… but check out this ump!!

    http://cache.boston....

  • Pat | April 17, 2008 at 11:56 am |

    [quote comment=”253444″]Ryan- with all due respect, it appears that all you did was “decorate” rather than design. Short track is a technical sport that requires a balance of performance and protection, neither of which you mentioned. You mention nothing of heat regulation, body articulation or kevlar protected “cut-zones.” You even mention that you “…didn’t look at anything speedkating-related.” An educated designer would never make such an ignorant statement, which is surprising because you would never design a “suspension chair” (which is cool) without a basic understanding of how a chair is constructed, developed and manufactured. All you’re showing is how to color-up a template and unfortunately the graphics fail to move with the body or promote the emotion, agression and speed of short track. It would have been more interesting to learn about the sport from an inside design point of view and less about how many color versions you decorated in one night. Cheers…[/quote]

    I’m taking huge offense to this comment. As a designer (granted a graphic designer, not a product or industrial designer) myself I completely disagree that what Ryan did was just “decorate.”

    If they had hired him to design a new suit with new technology, fabrics, or fit then it would be a different story, but he was hired to come up with an aesthetically pleasing design. It’s the same thing as when a sports team hires someone to design a new team uniform. They aren’t creating some new product they are designing the preexisting product. When all of the NHL teams had to come up with a new design for all of their uniforms because of the new Reebok template teams hired designers to come up with new uniform designs. If you want to tell me that those people simply decorated the uniform instead of designing them then that’s your issue. But what those people did was design.

    I actually really respect the fact that he went into the design of this suit cold. If he had taken a look at speed skating suits and studied the design of most of the suits then the goal that he had been given by the athlete that requested him would not have been met. The athlete wanted something original. The problem with studying past designs is that those will sneak into your creative process and you will start second guessing yourself, and create something more run of the mill rather than exciting and new. Which is exactly the opposite of what he was hired to do.

    Can we fault him for not getting all the information needed to design this suit, like fabrics, and restrictions on elements on the suit? I suppose. But I also think that could have played with his thought process at the beginning and the result would have been altered. It was also not mentioned to him by this Phil guy. And it seems to me adjusting his “decorations” to fit the new restrictions that were placed on his suit is a lot more work than coloring in the suit.

    Respect Ryan. I’m impressed.

  • Jake Pride | April 17, 2008 at 11:57 am |

    You’ve no doubt seen the news about the latest billionaire, aiming to bring the NFL back to Los Angeles. Ed Roski has launched a website to start building the momentum for his project:

    http://www.losangele...

    The thing looks like it belongs in some amusement park in Dubai. Here’s the full story:

    http://www.latimes.c...

    Thoughts, anyone?

  • Mickel Yantz | April 17, 2008 at 12:00 pm |

    With the talk of Dave Brown’s pic yesterday, I thought I would share a project I’m working on for fun about Seahawks Uniforms
    LINK
    Still a work in progress.

  • Ryan | April 17, 2008 at 12:00 pm |

    [quote comment=”253444″]Ryan- with all due respect, it appears that all you did was “decorate” rather than design. Short track is a technical sport that requires a balance of performance and protection, neither of which you mentioned. You mention nothing of heat regulation, body articulation or kevlar protected “cut-zones.” You even mention that you “…didn’t look at anything speedkating-related.” An educated designer would never make such an ignorant statement, which is surprising because you would never design a “suspension chair” (which is cool) without a basic understanding of how a chair is constructed, developed and manufactured. All you’re showing is how to color-up a template and unfortunately the graphics fail to move with the body or promote the emotion, agression and speed of short track. It would have been more interesting to learn about the sport from an inside design point of view and less about how many color versions you decorated in one night. Cheers…[/quote]

    Well, I guess I should probably reply to this one, shouldn’t I?

    First of, it’s long track speed skating, not short, so that changes alot (no “kevlar cut zones”, for instance). You now have only 2 skaters on the ice at a time, in an open layout, rather then 6 or more condensed in a small ring. The graphic design changes considerably. Consider newer football uniforms for the most part (think Atlanta Falcons, Arizona Cardinals, etc). There are alot of graphics present, and that is fine (still ugly, thought) when it’s just one guy or a fan wearing the replica, but you get 11 guys on the field wearing that, and it’s a visual assault. If I was designing short-track suits, that’d change to whole process for sure, but I wasn’t.

    With long track skating, it’s not about the amount of motion, but the fluidity and efficiency of every motion, so I wanted that feeling in the suit. I wanted the graphics to flow and to not create a falsity to the skater. On Phil’s suit I have a more off-centered look then the Ukrainian one, which is very balanced, but with both I didn’t want to create any false motion.

    Lastly, “ignorant” is not a word you would use when addressing somebody “with all due respect”. I do plenty of research, but at times you have to realize that you can get bogged down in research to the point that you don’t create anything original. Phil asked for me NOT to look at other suits so I didn’t try to design his like others I’d seen, so I did what my, essentially, client asked for. All uniform design can be simplified down to “coloring” if you want to put it like that, but then you’re just discrediting what uniform designers do. All the new NHL jerseys fit a template, and while some aren’t all that great, there was a designer that “colored” up ideas for each team, yet I don’t hear you dismissing them.

    “Cheers”

  • Matt D. | April 17, 2008 at 12:12 pm |

    [quote comment=”253485″] not a bad picture of Joe C. on that site too with the big foam cowboy hat and the sweet goodwill style t-shirt![/quote]

    I have never been more ashamed of my last name in my life! At least the Black Donnellys has a historical precedent.

  • Adam | April 17, 2008 at 12:13 pm |

    [quote comment=”253502″]Another thing about that Milt May photo: It used to be fairly common to see players kneeling in the on-deck circle (sometimes while taking practice swings, sometimes just kinda watching). You never see that anymore.[/quote]

    I haven’t seen him much since he left the White Sox, and for all I know he’s stopped, but Frank Thomas used to do that a lot.

    And, I just did some research, and he hasn’t

  • Chris is Nashville | April 17, 2008 at 12:14 pm |

    Well, I guess I should probably reply to this one, shouldn’t I?

    First of, it’s long track speed skating, not short, so that changes alot (no “kevlar cut zones”, for instance). You now have only 2 skaters on the ice at a time, in an open layout, rather then 6 or more condensed in a small ring. The graphic design changes considerably. Consider newer football uniforms for the most part (think Atlanta Falcons, Arizona Cardinals, etc). There are alot of graphics present, and that is fine (still ugly, thought) when it’s just one guy or a fan wearing the replica, but you get 11 guys on the field wearing that, and it’s a visual assault. If I was designing short-track suits, that’d change to whole process for sure, but I wasn’t.

    With long track skating, it’s not about the amount of motion, but the fluidity and efficiency of every motion, so I wanted that feeling in the suit. I wanted the graphics to flow and to not create a falsity to the skater. On Phil’s suit I have a more off-centered look then the Ukrainian one, which is very balanced, but with both I didn’t want to create any false motion.

    Lastly, “ignorant” is not a word you would use when addressing somebody “with all due respect”. I do plenty of research, but at times you have to realize that you can get bogged down in research to the point that you don’t create anything original. Phil asked for me NOT to look at other suits so I didn’t try to design his like others I’d seen, so I did what my, essentially, client asked for. All uniform design can be simplified down to “coloring” if you want to put it like that, but then you’re just discrediting what uniform designers do. All the new NHL jerseys fit a template, and while some aren’t all that great, there was a designer that “colored” up ideas for each team, yet I don’t hear you dismissing them.

    “Cheers”[/quote]

    Ryan, don’t feel like you need to defend yourself to anybody. I don’t see any of the rest of us have anything we have worked on that will be seen in front of a billion people in arguably the biggest sports arena. Dude, you did a great job. Keep it up.

  • Nuk | April 17, 2008 at 12:17 pm |

    [quote comment=”253515″]With the talk of Dave Brown’s pic yesterday, I thought I would share a project I’m working on for fun about Seahawks Uniforms
    LINK
    Still a work in progress.[/quote]

    It’s a really good start – The main challenge will be getting the number font right – it looks a little too wide right now

    Some examples: Dan Doornink

    Manu Tuiasosopo

  • Saru | April 17, 2008 at 12:19 pm |

    Like Toffs mentioned above, Score Draw also sells nice retro soccer shirts. Their current team selection is limited, but you can a broader selection (as well as cheaper prices) through eBay UK. Toffs is good about shipping overseas…unlike Ebbetts Field (took my money, but never shipped).

  • LI Phil | April 17, 2008 at 12:28 pm |

    [quote comment=”253516″][quote comment=”253444″]Ryan- with all due respect, it appears that all you did was “decorate” rather than design. Short track is a technical sport that requires a balance of performance and protection, neither of which you mentioned. You mention nothing of heat regulation, body articulation or kevlar protected “cut-zones.” You even mention that you “…didn’t look at anything speedkating-related.” An educated designer would never make such an ignorant statement, which is surprising because you would never design a “suspension chair” (which is cool) without a basic understanding of how a chair is constructed, developed and manufactured. All you’re showing is how to color-up a template and unfortunately the graphics fail to move with the body or promote the emotion, agression and speed of short track. It would have been more interesting to learn about the sport from an inside design point of view and less about how many color versions you decorated in one night. Cheers…[/quote]

    Well, I guess I should probably reply to this one, shouldn’t I?

    First of, it’s long track speed skating, not short, so that changes alot (no “kevlar cut zones”, for instance). You now have only 2 skaters on the ice at a time, in an open layout, rather then 6 or more condensed in a small ring. The graphic design changes considerably. Consider newer football uniforms for the most part (think Atlanta Falcons, Arizona Cardinals, etc). There are alot of graphics present, and that is fine (still ugly, thought) when it’s just one guy or a fan wearing the replica, but you get 11 guys on the field wearing that, and it’s a visual assault. If I was designing short-track suits, that’d change to whole process for sure, but I wasn’t.

    With long track skating, it’s not about the amount of motion, but the fluidity and efficiency of every motion, so I wanted that feeling in the suit. I wanted the graphics to flow and to not create a falsity to the skater. On Phil’s suit I have a more off-centered look then the Ukrainian one, which is very balanced, but with both I didn’t want to create any false motion.

    Lastly, “ignorant” is not a word you would use when addressing somebody “with all due respect”. I do plenty of research, but at times you have to realize that you can get bogged down in research to the point that you don’t create anything original. Phil asked for me NOT to look at other suits so I didn’t try to design his like others I’d seen, so I did what my, essentially, client asked for. All uniform design can be simplified down to “coloring” if you want to put it like that, but then you’re just discrediting what uniform designers do. All the new NHL jerseys fit a template, and while some aren’t all that great, there was a designer that “colored” up ideas for each team, yet I don’t hear you dismissing them.

    “Cheers”[/quote]

    AWESOME response ryan…and you don’t owe ANYONE an apology

    best of luck bro, keep up the good work!

  • Ian K | April 17, 2008 at 12:32 pm |

    [quote comment=”253514″]You’ve no doubt seen the news about the latest billionaire, aiming to bring the NFL back to Los Angeles. Ed Roski has launched a website to start building the momentum for his project:

    http://www.losangele...

    The thing looks like it belongs in some amusement park in Dubai. Here’s the full story:

    http://www.latimes.c...

    Thoughts, anyone?[/quote]

    Amusement park, yes, but all “artist’s renderings” of new stadiums tend to have that flash and flair to it. What I really like is how the stadium design incorporates the geography of the site and can be built into the hillsides, lowering construction costs. It sort of reminds me of Dodger Stadium or Duke University’s football stadium. I’m sure there are others, but those examples I’ve actually been to.

    Regardless, the NFL needs Los Angeles more than L.A. needs the NFL. L.A. Mayor Villaraigosa has already refused to publicly fund a new stadium within city limits so they have to move their site to…City of Industry? You mean “city of warehouses”? Have fun with that. I hope the NFL never returns to L.A. Go Trojans!

  • jaye | April 17, 2008 at 12:43 pm |

    My boys (13 and 11) sketch uniform ideas for their soccer and baseball teams. I can’t wait to show them this article about what this well-spoken young man is doing. Good work, Ryan.

  • Kek | April 17, 2008 at 12:43 pm |

    [quote comment=”253511″][quote comment=”253442″]

    The Cardinals did that same thing in the final year of Busch Stadium in 2005.

    Here’s a list of people who pulled each number off the wall:

    http://www.cardsclub...

    Interesting note:

    Ken Griffey Jr. pulled #77…..[/quote]

    I like #71, Bob Uecker. “Actor” is listed first, before Cards catcher or Brewers broadcaster. Is that really his most well known career?[/quote]
    I guess the person that wrote that list was a big fan of Mr. Belevedre.

  • Quint | April 17, 2008 at 1:09 pm |

    [quote comment=”253433″]That British speed skating outfit reminded me of this…

    http://z.about.com/d...
    I thought of this.

  • ELI | April 17, 2008 at 1:13 pm |

    Noticed on Steve Dewing’s site a photo of Bob Aspromonte w/ cut batting gloves. Interesting choice of material removal.

    http://www.thatsmybo...

    Also, major props Ryan, excellent job!

  • Original Jim | April 17, 2008 at 1:17 pm |

    [quote comment=”253512″]We talk about pajama bottoms all the time with players like Manny & such… but check out this ump!!

    http://cache.boston....

    Baggy, yes. But they have to be that way to accommodate leg guards worn underneath them. You don’t notice them as much when the umpire is squatting.

  • Lee | April 17, 2008 at 1:18 pm |

    [quote comment=”253488″]New Test and One day/Twenty20 uniforms for the England cricket team were revealed today.

    I’m not impressed, and I’m especially horrified by the adidas shoulder stripes.[/quote]
    agreed that i dont like the adidas stripes, but other than that, i think its an improvement over the current/old admiral kits. never really liked those. i quite like the Twenty20 shirts.

  • Pedro | April 17, 2008 at 1:20 pm |

    [quote comment=”253515″]With the talk of Dave Brown’s pic yesterday, I thought I would share a project I’m working on for fun about Seahawks Uniforms
    LINK
    Still a work in progress.[/quote]

    You’re off to a great start on your site man, real good stuff.

  • Shane | April 17, 2008 at 1:21 pm |

    Psssh, Toffs finally gets the PL endorsement?

    I love those guys. I’ve bought Man United and PSG shirts from them in the past.

  • MPowers1634 | April 17, 2008 at 1:47 pm |

    [quote comment=”253413″]Chad Moeller’s helmet may have a “6” on it, but if you look closely it is NOT centered, meaning that it looks like there is a digit missing, therefore I am not sure whose helmet that would have been[/quote]

    Or that the 1 simply fell off the brim of the helmet, although it would have been strange for the number to be facing the catcher instaed of outward!

    And as far as Prime Timegoes, those look like the original Nike Air Zoom Apocalypse from around 1996 that were incredible football cleats!

    Unfortunately, I live way too far away to go to any of those T-Bones promotion nights!

  • John T | April 17, 2008 at 2:07 pm |

    Interesting photo gallery here on the ‘Pink’ revolution in sport on both sides of the Atlantic (Minna, please turn away!!)

  • Teebz | April 17, 2008 at 2:34 pm |

    It’s rant time. Hide the children and cover their eyes. This one is gonna get ugly.

    Ryan, I fully commend you on your designs, and you have my utmost respect. What you do for a living will be critiqued for sure (all designers get it, I’ve heard), but the designs are excellent for skating and a sport that sometimes is forgotten.

    Well done, I say, and keep it going in whatever avenue you choose for your next project.

    As for “sharck”, and for the rest of the population on this board who like to crap on people who do their jobs well, you are the living proof of ignorant, aka ignorance personified.

    Critique the way the skate-skin looks. You’re allowed to add your two cents. However, the guy is a designer, not a speed-skating suit engineer. He’s not a fabric and textiles designer. He’s not involved in the sewing of the suit’s pieces together. He doesn’t work for Nike or Reebok or Adidas or any other major sports apparel company.

    If you feel like ripping someone for DOING THEIR JOB WELL in their chosen profession, it’s time you put up or shut up in that field since you’re apparently an expert. Otherwise, stick to whatever you do best and let designers like Ryan do their work. Ryan has done some wonderful work, and could certainly make a name for himself in the sports world if he so chooses.

    The next time you want to rip someone for doing their job, just remember that someone is always better than you at your job… meaning you’re expendable and/or unneeded.

    That is all.

    Once again… good job, Ryan!

  • DAL | April 17, 2008 at 2:53 pm |

    It looks like someone is selling a replica of the jersey that was buried at Yankee stadium.

    http://tinyurl.com/5...

    (Yes, I agree, this story is totally played out, but I thought that this new aspect of it was pretty funny)

  • DAL | April 17, 2008 at 2:54 pm |

    sorry, mixed up the link

    http://tinyurl.com/5...

  • Mark | April 17, 2008 at 2:59 pm |

    Bringing back some memories with the gear being worn in the on deck circle. I think I have seen the catchers on the local minor league team (Birmingham Barons) as well as the college catchers still do this. I’m sure that all points to the increased TV time in between innings.

  • Jim W | April 17, 2008 at 3:15 pm |

    Get your bids ready!

    http://sports.espn.g...

  • zurk | April 17, 2008 at 3:17 pm |

    Great job Ryan – I personally wouldl love to have the ability and opportunity to “decorate” something like that. Everytime he is out there wearing your design thats got to make you feel great!

  • DrBear | April 17, 2008 at 3:24 pm |

    Paul, I love the blog, love the columns … but that link to the KKK seamstress has got to go. I’m disappointed you included it. Any publicity for racist scum like that is too much, and I’m disappointed in you for providing it. The connection to what’s done here is far too much of a stretch.
    In the immortal words of Jake Blues, “I hate Illinois Nazis.”

  • Steve | April 17, 2008 at 3:30 pm |

    Darren Rovell makes a good point. Imagine if Howie Long’s son was drafted by the Raiders, and chose #75 (his dad’s number with the Raiders) to wear?

    Chris Long said he “will probably wear whatever number they want me to.”

    http://www.cnbc.com/...

  • Wade Harder | April 17, 2008 at 3:31 pm |

    Great work, Ryan! My childhood of drawing sounds just like yours, but I decided to go into architecture because I liked drawing, and I liked math. But after going through 5 years of architecture school and 4 years of working, I can tell you that there’s not much math involved at all!

  • Shaftman | April 17, 2008 at 3:39 pm |

    I’m at Shea last night watching the Mets game and I look at the right field wall and what do I see but a Geico and Casio advertisement right next to each other. I never noticed how similar their logos are. They have almost identical colors and the same font type.

    Seperated at birth? You decide.

  • diz | April 17, 2008 at 3:40 pm |

    [quote comment=”253566″]Interesting photo gallery here on the ‘Pink’ revolution in sport on both sides of the Atlantic (Minna, please turn away!!)[/quote]

    Just a shame there was no mention of the Rosebury colours (scroll down.)

  • Duckstyle | April 17, 2008 at 4:03 pm |

    [quote comment=”253518″][quote comment=”253502″]Another thing about that Milt May photo: It used to be fairly common to see players kneeling in the on-deck circle (sometimes while taking practice swings, sometimes just kinda watching). You never see that anymore.[/quote]

    I haven’t seen him much since he left the White Sox, and for all I know he’s stopped, but Frank Thomas used to do that a lot.

    And, I just did some research, and he hasn’t[/quote]

    Yep, Big Frank used to kneel all the time when on deck. I used to get some pretty sweet seats right behind the sox “real” on deck circle back in the early 90’s, noone ever uses the real circle anymore, and he spent more time kneeling then warming up. I’ve got probably 100 picutres from back then in storage at my parents house, unfortunitly. Watching him swing a lead pipe to warm up blew my 12ish year old mind.

  • BrianC | April 17, 2008 at 4:05 pm |

    I agree, TOFFS does excellent work.

  • Duckstyle | April 17, 2008 at 4:06 pm |

    Looks like the Packers are retiring Favre’s jersey on the first game of the season, Monday night.

  • Priest | April 17, 2008 at 4:08 pm |

    I’m not sure if it has been mentioned (sorry, I don’t have time to read all the comments right now) but it is fairly common for hockey players to not wear socks as well. I think that would be an interesting uni-watch project, to try and find out what percentage of pro hockey players wear socks. In my experience, its always been the players who think that they are really good that go sockless (of course there are exceptions, so don’t yell at me if you play hockey sockless).

  • Duckstyle | April 17, 2008 at 4:12 pm |

    I should said retiring Favre’s number, not jersey. Edit button?

  • =bg= | April 17, 2008 at 4:27 pm |

    wouldn’t an edit button be swell?

  • Teebz | April 17, 2008 at 4:35 pm |

    [quote comment=”253604″]I’m not sure if it has been mentioned (sorry, I don’t have time to read all the comments right now) but it is fairly common for hockey players to not wear socks as well. I think that would be an interesting uni-watch project, to try and find out what percentage of pro hockey players wear socks. In my experience, its always been the players who think that they are really good that go sockless (of course there are exceptions, so don’t yell at me if you play hockey sockless).[/quote]

    Eric Lindros never wore socks. ‘Nuff said.

  • KT | April 17, 2008 at 4:46 pm |

    I don’t remember which league had the rule and which didn’t, but it used to be a different rule between the American and National Leagues that a catcher COULDN’T wear his shinguards in the on-deck circle in one league and COULD in the other.

    This was in a story I read many years ago along the lines of “You know about the DH, but here are some other differences between the two leagues that you might not have known.”

  • Clint | April 17, 2008 at 4:49 pm |

    Look at the NOB of Antwaan Randle EL from when he played at Indiana. It looks like it says A. Randle El. I can’t believe how close the El is to his TV number and how it extends on to his sleeve!

    http://vault.sportsi...

  • Duckstyle | April 17, 2008 at 4:59 pm |

    [quote comment=”253620″]Look at the NOB of Antwaan Randle EL from when he played at Indiana. It looks like it says A. Randle El. I can’t believe how close the El is to his TV number and how it extends on to his sleeve!

    http://vault.sportsi...[/quote]

    Man those old IU unis were so CFL-looking, terrible. No offense CFL fans.

  • werthj | April 17, 2008 at 5:01 pm |

    Ryan-
    When can I make a downpayment for one of those chairs? Badass….
    Way to represent WI.

  • Johnny O | April 17, 2008 at 5:11 pm |

    There is a great take on ESPN.com on why Prince Fielder is without a homer yet this year. (Although he just hit a two run shot in the 10th to beat the Red Birds today)

    Who was the last 50-homer man before Prince Fielder to go this deep into the following April without a homer? Whaddaya know, it was his dad, Cecil, in 1991 (first homer: April 19).

    So what’s up? Scouts and our own Inside Edge data have suggested that Fielder is being pitched a lot differently so far, and hasn’t gotten many pitches out over the plate to drive. But one NL scout has a different theory.

    “I blame the pants,” he said. “His pants are so big, the wind catches him and blows him off course.”

    So apparently, he’s not lost at the plate. He’s lost at sea.

  • Patrick | April 17, 2008 at 5:13 pm |

    [quote comment=”253624″][quote comment=”253620″]Look at the NOB of Antwaan Randle EL from when he played at Indiana. It looks like it says A. Randle El. I can’t believe how close the El is to his TV number and how it extends on to his sleeve!

    http://vault.sportsi...[/quote]

    Man those old IU unis were so CFL-looking, terrible. No offense CFL fans.[/quote]

    I had forgotten how bad Indiana used to look. That black helmet was horrendous!

  • Duckstyle | April 17, 2008 at 5:16 pm |

    Logo creep reaches a whole new level. That’s puny! I’m gonna go smother myself now.

  • Johnny O | April 17, 2008 at 5:17 pm |

    [quote comment=”253626″]There is a great take on ESPN.com on why Prince Fielder is without a homer yet this year. (Although he just hit a two run shot in the 10th to beat the Red Birds today)

    Who was the last 50-homer man before Prince Fielder to go this deep into the following April without a homer? Whaddaya know, it was his dad, Cecil, in 1991 (first homer: April 19).

    So what’s up? Scouts and our own Inside Edge data have suggested that Fielder is being pitched a lot differently so far, and hasn’t gotten many pitches out over the plate to drive. But one NL scout has a different theory.

    “I blame the pants,” he said. “His pants are so big, the wind catches him and blows him off course.”

    So apparently, he’s not lost at the plate. He’s lost at sea.[/quote]

    And, sorry to quote myself, of course Prince has been wearing “pajama pants” for a week or so now. However, I am not sure the writer meant his really baggy pajama pants, or the “Babe Ruth” pants he wore for a while this season. Either way he’s right.

  • Mark MihaIik | April 17, 2008 at 5:21 pm |

    [quote]“That’s Deion Sanders on the left,” says Greg Riffenburgh. “He’s wearing a pair of Nike’s football cleats on the baseball field, though I’m sure they were customized (metal spikes instead of replaceable conical cleats) for the diamond.”[/quote]

    Deion did this throughout his playing career with both sports. For the model that Greg pointed out as well as for Deion’s many signature shoes, Nike would make a football version, a baseball version, and a turf version for each model.

    Below are five different instances of the same upper appearing on Deion’s feet in both baseball and football:

    One | Two | Three | Four | Five

  • Duckstyle | April 17, 2008 at 5:23 pm |

    [quote comment=”253630″][quote comment=”253626″]There is a great take on ESPN.com on why Prince Fielder is without a homer yet this year. (Although he just hit a two run shot in the 10th to beat the Red Birds today)

    Who was the last 50-homer man before Prince Fielder to go this deep into the following April without a homer? Whaddaya know, it was his dad, Cecil, in 1991 (first homer: April 19).

    So what’s up? Scouts and our own Inside Edge data have suggested that Fielder is being pitched a lot differently so far, and hasn’t gotten many pitches out over the plate to drive. But one NL scout has a different theory.

    “I blame the pants,” he said. “His pants are so big, the wind catches him and blows him off course.”

    So apparently, he’s not lost at the plate. He’s lost at sea.[/quote]

    And, sorry to quote myself, of course Prince has been wearing “pajama pants” for a week or so now. However, I am not sure the writer meant his really baggy pajama pants, or the “Babe Ruth” pants he wore for a while this season. Either way he’s right.[/quote]

    Ruth’s weren’t that baggy. If there’s a name for his ridiculous attempt at old-school pants, it isn’t “Babe Ruth Pants”.

  • Mark MihaIik | April 17, 2008 at 5:32 pm |

    [quote comment=”253632″][quote]“That’s Deion Sanders on the left,” says Greg Riffenburgh. “He’s wearing a pair of Nike’s football cleats on the baseball field, though I’m sure they were customized (metal spikes instead of replaceable conical cleats) for the diamond.”[/quote]

    Deion did this throughout his playing career with both sports. For the model that Greg pointed out as well as for Deion’s many signature shoes, Nike would make a football version, a baseball version, and a turf version for each model.

    Below are five different instances of the same upper appearing on Deion’s feet in both baseball and football:

    One | Two | Three | Four | Five[/quote]

    I should also note that he wore a variety of different sport-specific outsoles for both baseball and football (so it wasn’t just one baseball, one football, and one turf model for each). When I was putting those pics together, I saw both metal and MCS baseball cleats, both molded and detachable football cleats, and turf configurations for many of those models.

  • Chris is Nashville | April 17, 2008 at 5:34 pm |

    Chuck Norris doesn’t wear socks. Socks wear Chuck Norris.

  • Duckstyle | April 17, 2008 at 5:44 pm |

    [quote comment=”253636″]Chuck Norris doesn’t wear socks. Socks wear Chuck Norris.[/quote]

    We can’t get so off topic though, Chuck’s socks don’t even have elastic for crying out loud. They’re simply affraid to fall down.

  • LI Phil | April 17, 2008 at 5:44 pm |

    [quote comment=”253634″]Ruth’s weren’t that baggy. If there’s a name for his ridiculous attempt at old-school pants, it isn’t “Babe Ruth Pants”.[/quote]

    your pants are bigger than circus tents…you’ll never make it to the bigs with pants that big…think classy, you’ll be classy…if you hit 50 in the show, you can wear the circus tents and the press’ll think you’re colorful…until you hit 50 in the show, however, it means you are a slob…

  • Duckstyle | April 17, 2008 at 5:51 pm |

    [quote comment=”253638″][quote comment=”253634″]Ruth’s weren’t that baggy. If there’s a name for his ridiculous attempt at old-school pants, it isn’t “Babe Ruth Pants”.[/quote]

    your pants are bigger than circus tents…you’ll never make it to the bigs with pants that big…think classy, you’ll be classy…if you hit 50 in the show, you can wear the circus tents and the press’ll think you’re colorful…until you hit 50 in the show, however, it means you are a slob…[/quote]

    If peeing your pants is cool, consider me Miles Davis.

  • LI Phil | April 17, 2008 at 5:55 pm |

    [quote comment=”253639″]If peeing your pants is cool, consider me Miles Davis.[/quote]

    what you’ve just said is one of the most insanely idiotic things i have ever heard…at no point in your rambling, incoherent response were you even close to anything that could be considered a rational thought…everyone on this board is now dumber for having listened to it…i award you no points, and may god have mercy on your soul…

  • tiburon | April 17, 2008 at 5:58 pm |

    Sweet Red Stirrups on Wilbur Wood, featuring a “White Sock”
    http://www.thatsmybo...

  • Chris is Nashville | April 17, 2008 at 6:14 pm |

    [quote comment=”253640″][quote comment=”253639″]If peeing your pants is cool, consider me Miles Davis.[/quote]

    what you’ve just said is one of the most insanely idiotic things i have ever heard…at no point in your rambling, incoherent response were you even close to anything that could be considered a rational thought…everyone on this board is now dumber for having listened to it…i award you no points, and may god have mercy on your soul…[/quote]

    In his defense, it’s a line from Billy Madison, not just some random thought.

  • lwiedy | April 17, 2008 at 6:19 pm |

    [quote comment=”253641″]Sweet Red Stirrups on Wilbur Wood, featuring a “White Sock”
    http://www.thatsmybo...

    Even better (IMO) White Sox.

  • A.J. Zydzik | April 17, 2008 at 6:22 pm |

    [quote comment=”253646″][quote comment=”253640″][quote comment=”253639″]If peeing your pants is cool, consider me Miles Davis.[/quote]

    what you’ve just said is one of the most insanely idiotic things i have ever heard…at no point in your rambling, incoherent response were you even close to anything that could be considered a rational thought…everyone on this board is now dumber for having listened to it…i award you no points, and may god have mercy on your soul…[/quote]

    In his defense, it’s a line from Billy Madison, not just some random thought.[/quote]

    Thats awesome, not only does the original quote go over most peoples heads, but the response (also from Billy Madison), also goes over most peoples heads…

    Oh yeah, re: Prince’s homerun today…the pants make no difference, it was the fact he was using Joe Dillon’s bat (you could see the number 27 on the bottom of it)

  • lwiedy | April 17, 2008 at 6:23 pm |

    [quote comment=”253646″][quote comment=”253640″][quote comment=”253639″]If peeing your pants is cool, consider me Miles Davis.[/quote]

    what you’ve just said is one of the most insanely idiotic things i have ever heard…at no point in your rambling, incoherent response were you even close to anything that could be considered a rational thought…everyone on this board is now dumber for having listened to it…i award you no points, and may god have mercy on your soul…[/quote]

    In his defense, it’s a line from Billy Madison, not just some random thought.[/quote]

    Is that the one where Adam Sandler plays an overly juvenile character?

  • A.J. Zydzik | April 17, 2008 at 6:24 pm |

    [quote comment=”253648″][quote comment=”253646″][quote comment=”253640″][quote comment=”253639″]If peeing your pants is cool, consider me Miles Davis.[/quote]

    what you’ve just said is one of the most insanely idiotic things i have ever heard…at no point in your rambling, incoherent response were you even close to anything that could be considered a rational thought…everyone on this board is now dumber for having listened to it…i award you no points, and may god have mercy on your soul…[/quote]

    In his defense, it’s a line from Billy Madison, not just some random thought.[/quote]

    Thats awesome, not only does the original quote go over most peoples heads, but the response (also from Billy Madison), also goes over most peoples heads…

    Oh yeah, re: Prince’s homerun today…the pants make no difference, it was the fact he was using Joe Dillon’s bat (you could see the number 27 on the bottom of it)[/quote]

    I shouldnt have said MOST people’s heads, its not like you cant turn on cable TV and find Billy Madison playing on one station most of the time…

  • A.J. Zydzik | April 17, 2008 at 6:25 pm |

    [quote comment=”253649″][quote comment=”253646″][quote comment=”253640″][quote comment=”253639″]If peeing your pants is cool, consider me Miles Davis.[/quote]

    what you’ve just said is one of the most insanely idiotic things i have ever heard…at no point in your rambling, incoherent response were you even close to anything that could be considered a rational thought…everyone on this board is now dumber for having listened to it…i award you no points, and may god have mercy on your soul…[/quote]

    In his defense, it’s a line from Billy Madison, not just some random thought.[/quote]

    Is that the one where Adam Sandler plays an overly juvenile character?[/quote]

    Come on, in Punch Drunk Love he was only slightly juvenile, give him a break!

  • Whayne | April 17, 2008 at 6:47 pm |

    [quote comment=”253455″][quote comment=”253413″]Chad Moeller’s helmet may have a “6” on it, but if you look closely it is NOT centered, meaning that it looks like there is a digit missing, therefore I am not sure whose helmet that would have been[/quote]

    You’re right. I’m sure it’s Jose Molina’s extra helmet, that had the “2” peeled off.

    http://newyork.yanke...

    Molina wears this

  • Chris is Nashville | April 17, 2008 at 6:55 pm |

    I feel like an idiot. Damn you LI Phil

  • Nicole | April 17, 2008 at 7:10 pm |

    According to Prince, his pants were homage to the Negro leagues .. take that for what you will.

    However, I think it’s no trick of voodoo that Prince used Crazy Joe Dillon’s bat and hit the homer!

    Also, I’d think Uecker is slightly more famous to the general public as the announcer from the Major League movies than as the Brewers radio announcer.

  • Kevin Z. | April 17, 2008 at 7:13 pm |

    They still teach catchers to leave their shin guards even while on deck with two outs. I still do it at the college club level. Must be the pros where you can’t be troubled to take them off real quick before you go up to bat.

  • alex | April 17, 2008 at 7:28 pm |

    [quote comment=”253514″]You’ve no doubt seen the news about the latest billionaire, aiming to bring the NFL back to Los Angeles. Ed Roski has launched a website to start building the momentum for his project:

    http://www.losangele...

    The thing looks like it belongs in some amusement park in Dubai. Here’s the full story:

    http://www.latimes.c...

    Thoughts, anyone?[/quote]
    This looks like the stadium has a cold sore. I’m not too militant about advertising in Stadiums, but if it’s even half as bad as that it’ll still look terrible.

  • James Craven | April 17, 2008 at 7:30 pm |

    [quote comment=”253479″][quote comment=”253442″]“Interesting note:

    Ken Griffey Jr. pulled #77…..”[/quote]
    “Interesting in that he usually pulls his hamstring.”[/quote]

    Well played, sir. Very well played.

    [quote comment=”253652″]“Molina wears this.”[/quote]

    It’s America’s favorite game, Name That Molina! Now here’s your host, Steve Berthiume!

  • James Craven | April 17, 2008 at 7:31 pm |

    BTW, the Phillies did this game countdown thing when they closed that dump called Veterans Stadium back in ’03

  • LI Phil | April 17, 2008 at 7:36 pm |

    [quote comment=”253655″]I feel like an idiot. Damn you LI Phil[/quote]

    and here i thought you were just playing along

    cheers Chris!

  • LI Phil | April 17, 2008 at 7:57 pm |

    [quote]Is that the one where Adam Sandler plays an overly juvenile character?[/quote]

    second time today i “LOL”ed at a quote on this board

    /thanks larry

  • Bake | April 17, 2008 at 8:01 pm |

    I’ve been lurking here for a couple months now. Thought it was finally time to post.

    The “decorate” comment was completely off base. I’ve been working in uniform design for nearly 4 years now and there are many aspects involved. While Ryan may not have done the apparel design for the uniforms, the graphic design is equally as important as is evidenced in this very blog. Do you honestly think the same person that designs the cut and fit of a uniform also designs the numbering and team embellishment? 9 times out 10 it’s not the case.

    Ryan, spectacular job. It’s not as simple as it seems to “decorate” a uniform. You paid attention to many details that even some of the graphic designers I work with tend to forget.

  • J-P | April 17, 2008 at 8:06 pm |

    I’ve got to say that the photos on Steve Dewing’s site are gorgeous. I don’t know if it’s the lighting, the lenses or what but they look great. It’s cool to see guys that are coaching or managing today when they were young ie. Cito Gaston. Some of the players like Fisk, Gaylord Perry, John Candeleria and Dave Parker I remember seeing play, although they were in the twilights of their careers.

  • LI Phil | April 17, 2008 at 9:32 pm |

    [quote]I hadn’t noticed that catchers were no longer coming to the on-deck circle with shin guards on with two out. I do remember that in the 70s, when it was common, Johnny Bench didn’t do it. When asked why, he said he wanted to show confidence that the guy at bat was going to get a hit.[/quote]

    so…why is manram standing in the circle with his glove and cap on?

  • lwiedy | April 17, 2008 at 11:17 pm |

    [quote comment=”253697″][quote]I hadn’t noticed that catchers were no longer coming to the on-deck circle with shin guards on with two out. I do remember that in the 70s, when it was common, Johnny Bench didn’t do it. When asked why, he said he wanted to show confidence that the guy at bat was going to get a hit.[/quote]

    so…why is manram standing in the circle with his glove and cap on?[/quote]

    Are you kidding me, you know how long it takes to put that stuff on? Besides it saves him exactly 13 steps to go back in the dugout, come back out of the dugout and go to left.

  • LI Phil | April 17, 2008 at 11:29 pm |

    [quote comment=”253703″][quote comment=”253697″][quote]I hadn’t noticed that catchers were no longer coming to the on-deck circle with shin guards on with two out. I do remember that in the 70s, when it was common, Johnny Bench didn’t do it. When asked why, he said he wanted to show confidence that the guy at bat was going to get a hit.[/quote]

    so…why is manram standing in the circle with his glove and cap on?[/quote]

    Are you kidding me, you know how long it takes to put that stuff on? Besides it saves him exactly 13 steps to go back in the dugout, come back out of the dugout and go to left.[/quote]

    actually…i was going for this

    but your answer is good too ;)

  • Joseph | April 17, 2008 at 11:37 pm |

    As recently as 2006 I have seen catchers in local leagues do this. I did it myself throughout all my years of organized ball (through 2000). I always thought it was a courtesy to keep the game moving along should the guy in front of you get out. We often played doubleheaders so expediency was expected.

  • Will Streit | April 17, 2008 at 11:50 pm |

    [quote comment=”253413″]Chad Moeller’s helmet may have a “6” on it, but if you look closely it is NOT centered, meaning that it looks like there is a digit missing, therefore I am not sure whose helmet that would have been[/quote]

    The NY logo is also uncentered

  • lwiedy | April 18, 2008 at 1:06 am |

    [quote comment=”253704″][quote comment=”253703″][quote comment=”253697″][quote]I hadn’t noticed that catchers were no longer coming to the on-deck circle with shin guards on with two out. I do remember that in the 70s, when it was common, Johnny Bench didn’t do it. When asked why, he said he wanted to show confidence that the guy at bat was going to get a hit.[/quote]

    so…why is manram standing in the circle with his glove and cap on?[/quote]

    Are you kidding me, you know how long it takes to put that stuff on? Besides it saves him exactly 13 steps to go back in the dugout, come back out of the dugout and go to left.[/quote]

    actually…i was going for this

    but your answer is good too ;)[/quote]

    Ah! Bach!

  • lwiedy | April 18, 2008 at 1:16 am |

    Phil, if you haven’t noticed, I can be pretty slow on the uptake. Your clever subtlety is too much for me. I fell for exactly four April Fools items and knew damn well what day it is.

    I was thinking it was gullibility, but now I’m beginning to think when it comes out, “so-and-so did or said this” I just figure it is really not beyond belief and it’s more fun to just think “what a dope” when it maybe it’s…anyway, keep ’em coming.

  • jim nedelka | April 20, 2008 at 1:07 am |

    Chad Moeller’s helmet may have a “6″ on it, but if you look closely it is NOT centered, meaning that it looks like there is a digit missing, therefore I am not sure whose helmet that would have been

    …wonder if Chad’s helmet was once used by Roy White’s?

  • Roger | April 24, 2008 at 10:35 am |

    “Minnesota’s new football uniforms, unveiled yesterday, look like this, and holy shit do I hate that pants-striping treatment. No rear-view photo yet, but you can see that the stripe does a butt-cheek wraparound, which is bad news. Idiotic piping on the jersey, too. Piece o’”

    “Must obey Nike! Must obey Nike! Must obey Nike!”