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A Close Look at Falcons Logo Inconsistencies

We all know the basics of the Atlanta Falcons’ logo history. The team wore its original falcon logo from 1966 through 2002 (as seen on the helmet shown at right), and then in 2003 they replaced it with the more stylized logo that they still wear today.

But here’s something you might not know (and that I didn’t know myself until reader Matthew Dunn recently brought it to my attention): There were at least four different versions of that original logo — and there have been extended periods when two of those versions routinely appeared on the Falcons’ uniforms at the same time.

Let’s start with the Falcons’ first two seasons — 1966 and ’67. For those two years, the team’s primary logo appeared on the uniform in two places: on the helmet and as a sleeve patch. But the two logos, while very similar, didn’t quite match. Take a look at these photos, all of which are from those first two seasons (for everything in today’s post, you can click to enlarge): (Continue reading)

’Skins Watch: Hockey Team Sets New Standard in WTF-ness

What you see at right (and can click to enlarge) is the logo for the Lake Erie Warriors, a Pennsylvania-based team in the new National College Prospects Hockey League, which will have its inaugural season this fall. The team and the logo have existed for at least four months, but I didn’t become aware of them until yesterday, when reader Bill Stewart brought them to my attention. “I’m not generally against Native American themes, but this just seems in poor taste,” he wrote. “Can’t believe that’s what they went with.”

Neither can I.

In case you’re wondering, the logo also appears on the team’s jersey (click to enlarge): (Continue reading)

Not That There’s Anything Wrong With That

In yesterday’s installment of Collector’s Corner, Brinke Guthrie showcased a few items featuring the Tampa Bay Buccaneers’ original mascot character, Bucco Bruce.

I was 12 years old when Bucco Bruce and the rest of the Bucs’ inaugural creamsicle design scheme were introduced in 1976. Bruce was an object of scorn for years — in part, no doubt, because the early Bucs were a historically bad team, although I’m pretty sure people also disliked the logo on its own terms. When the Bucs jettisoned the creamsicles and went pewter in 1997, most people said, “Good riddance.”

In recent years, though, Bruce has had a bit of a renaissance. What once seemed embarrassing now seems nostalgically quaint. Disdain and contempt have given way to a sentimental embrace. (Lots of other old logos and uniform designs have traveled that same route, of course.)

All of which raises two questions that I don’t think we’ve ever addressed here: (Continue reading)

A Close Look at the Penguins’ Helmets

[Editor’s Note: Today we have a guest post from Scott Lederer, who’s taking a deep dive on the Penguins’ helmets. — PL]

By Scott Lederer

I’ve been watching a lot of hockey lately — just about every game. When you watch this much hockey and you like uniforms as much as I do, you start to notice things. And I’ve noticed some things about the Penguins’ helmet decals.

The Penguins have an excellent equipment staff. They do lots of things right and have great attention to detail. They even have a bunch of excellent behind-the-scenes stuff posted regularly on Twitter by their equipment manager, Dana Heinze. So it doesn’t surprise me that there are a couple details about their helmet that caught my attention.

First, I’ve noticed that when the Penguins wear their black and yellow alternate jerseys (as they have then entire playoffs), they change the color of the helmet numbers and logos to a matching yellow and white [click to enlarge]: (Continue reading)