Uni Watch Book Club: ‘Stars and Strikes: Baseball and America in the Bicentennial Summer of ’76’

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Reader Ed . . . → Read More: Uni Watch Book Club: ‘Stars and Strikes: Baseball and America in the Bicentennial Summer of ’76’

Let’s Look Back — WAY Back

We all love Dressed to the Nines. But if you’re seriously into old-timey baseball history, D2T9s has a serious limitation: It only goes back to 1901. Nobody has come up with a visual database for 19th-century baseball uniform designs.

Until now. A new site called Threads of Our Game launched on Tuesday, and . . . → Read More: Let’s Look Back — WAY Back

You Sunk My Battleship!

Back in 2007, when this website was still in its toddler phase, I ran an entry about how Bear Bryant had decided to distinguish the twins Harry and Larry Jones — who both played for Bryant at Kentucky in the early 1950s — by assigning them the uniform numbers 1A and 1B, as seen . . . → Read More: You Sunk My Battleship!

A Pittsburgh History Mystery

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Paul here, once again pinch-hitting for Phil. Reader Bruce Margulies recently came across a very interesting find: a photo of Willie Stargell wearing a batting helmet with the Pirates’ old “smiling pirate” logo at what appears to be Wrigley Field. I wasn’t aware of the Pirates . . . → Read More: A Pittsburgh History Mystery