A Well-Dressed Title Game

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So it’s . . . → Read More: A Well-Dressed Title Game

No Play for Mr. Gray — But Long Live Mr. Grey!

Gray plays a prominent role in the uni-verse. Baseball teams wear road grays; college football and basketball teams are increasingly prone to having gray alternate unis in their wardrobes; NFL teams like to annoy The Jeff by wearing gray facemasks; the L.A. Kings’ new Stadium Series uniform has a lot of gray; and so on.

When I started working in the book publishing industry back in the late 1980s, I was taught that there were two ways to spell gray: the American way, with an “a,” or the British/Commonwealth way, with an “e” (which is easy to keep straight because “America” starts with an “a” and “England” starts with an “e”). Most American style guides call for “gray,” not “grey,” and that’s always what I’ve used.

Lately, though, “gray” has begun to bug me. I can’t fully explain why, but “gray” just doesn’t match the feel of the color as much as “grey” does. “Grey” feels, well, greyer, at least to me. When I see the “e”-inclusive version of the word, I instinctively get the feel of a cloudy day, a certain dreariness, and other things that I associate with the color. I’ve never fully gotten that feeling from the “gray” spelling, which for some reason feels a bit brighter and therefore less in keeping with the spirit of the word. (Continue reading)

Zip-a-Dee-Doo-Dah

You know the drlll

I want to go slightly off-uni today to talk about a design-related experience I recently had. The story begins about 19 years ago, when I bought the heavy black leather jacket you see above. It was, and still is, damn near perfect. From the moment . . . → Read More: Zip-a-Dee-Doo-Dah

That Logo Looks Good Enough to Eat!

Nathan Shields is an illustrator. Some of his work is done the conventional way, but he’s making a name for himself by producing an impressive body of work in a very non-traditional medium: pancake batter.

Shields recently partnered Fansided to create a series of videos that show him creating pancake versions of all 32 NFL team logos. It would be one thing if he used little plastic logo molds or something like that, but he drew them freehand — so cool! The videos are mesmerizing to watch, and the results are surprisingly good. I have a feeling most of these weren’t done perfectly on the first take, but whatever — it’s a great project.

Each video runs about half a minute. You can see all 32 of them below, grouped by division: (Continue reading)