Up (with) the Establishment!, continued

Back in late April I suggested that it would be good to have a team called the Establishment. At the end of that piece I invited readers to come up with a logo for that team, with the promise of a free membership card or a piece of swag to the person who submitted the best design.

A handful of readers responded — and then I forgot all about it.

So today we’re taking an overdue look at what the Establishment’s logo might look like. There weren’t that many entries, so let’s look at all of them:

Anthony Scandiffio

Anthony Scandiffio

“I am by no means an artist, but this would be the basic concept of my logo idea. Faceless, just daring you to challenge them to something.”

• • •

Matthiew Mitchell

matthiew mitchell

“It’s my (schooled) opinion that a logo should use minimal type and be visually expressive,” says Matthiew. “I worked six minutes on this — I hope you’re smirking.”

• • •

Denver Gregg

Denver Gregg

Gregg provided a press release for his logo:

Inspired by an optimistic description of the future made in 1948, the elements that directly depict the Establishment are quite detailed, while those that represent the plebeian are more generic, so the viewer can readily tell what matters most. It’s basically all shades of gray, as exploiting nuance is one of the Establishment’s greatest advantages. The white area is reserved for co-branding with marketing partners, so look to see leading social indicators, including Apple, GM, media conglomerates, major political parties and the like. Collect the whole set! The downward path of the wordmark evokes the downward movement of the boot. The typeface reflects all the Establishment has to offer. If you look closely, you’ll note that the boot is a galosh. This not only protects The Man’s garb from contact with the untermensch but adds an extra note of humiliation to the target.

• • •

Jeff Hannaford

establishment

“To me, the Establishment immediately suggests a gray pinstripe suit with tie” says Jeff. “Pinstripes pretty much equal baseball, so my “Establishment” is a baseball club. It’s a sorta rough sketch of what I have in my head (the shape of the “e/tie” could really use some streamlining, as well as the shadows) since my Adobe Illustrator skills fall far behind my InDesign and Photoshop skills. But it gives the idea.”

• • •

John Muir

John Muir 1

John Muir 3

John Muir 2

“I’m no artist, but I’m fairly proud of my meeting-doodles, so I took a stab at this,” says John. “The first two logos are different takes on a briefcase; the red ‘E’ is supposed to look like a ‘TOP SECRET’ stencil. The other logo is a necktie. Why did I use purple? Not to give you an itch, but one overarching theme of Uni Watch has been to challenge the perception of uniformity as presented by the corporate, the mainstream, the Establishment. What better color to represent the Big E.”

• • •

Pat Smith

Pat Smith

“You said it yourself — the Establishment is a nameless, faceless monolith,” says Pat. “So I went with that.”

• • •

Gordon Blau

Gordon Blau 2

“I imagined a team called the Establishment would need a shorter nickname, kinda like the D-Backs or Fins, hence the Blish,” says Gordon. “For the logo, I went with the Eye of Providence from the dollar bill, except as Brandiose would interpret it, with forward motion and an angry eye. Keeping with the legal tender theme, the wordmark and number typeface are also derived from our currency. Finally, I named the colors with all the pretentious arrogance I imagine Nike would bring to the project.”

• • •

Anonymous Entrant

Anonymous

“It’s a study in contrasts, similar to the contradictory nature of the Establishment and all of our roles in it,” says this designer, who prefers to remain anonymous. “The penguin is nurturing the ball on his feet (similar to how a penguin would warm an egg) yet brandishing the bat as a symbol of control and coercion. The black and white colors of the penguin also reinforce the theme of contrast. I’d like to say the formality of the tuxedo contrasts with the casual execution of the design, but actually I was away for a few days and didn’t have time to do anything more polished. But at least it fits the thesis.”

• • •

Jordan Cutler

As you can see above (or by clicking here), Jordan prepared four different designs. He offered no commentary on them.

• • •

So that’s it. I’ll be honest: None of these feels exactly dead-on right to me, but there are three I like better than the others: John Muir’s briefcase (suit color notwithstanding), Denver Gregg’s boot to the face, and Pat Smith’s black box. Now I’ll let you folks choose the winner:


The best Establishment logo is:
  
pollcode.com free polls 

+ + + + +

image

The two gents you see above are reader Marty Buccafusco and, of course, weekend editor Phil Hecken, who were among the two dozen or so folks who joined me last night to celebrate Uni Watch’s 15th anniversary. It was a great night — my thanks to everyone who showed up. More photos (hopefully without odd eyeball reflections) and details in a day or two.

+ + + + +

’Skins Watch: The Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation had prepared an anti-’Skins commercial to run during the Super Bowl last winter. It didn’t air then (although it was posted online), but it ended up airing last night during Game 3 of the NBA Finals. … The ’Skins have hired a K Street lobbying group to push back against those who are calling for the team’s name to be changed. … The ’Skins are also conducting focus groups about the team’s name, among other things (from Tommy Turner). … Good article on how a lifelong ’Skins fan changed his mind and now thinks the team’s name should be changed. Interestingly, he ties it into the state culture of Maryland. … The singer Pharrell Williams has issued an apology after appearing on the cover of the UK edition of Elle magazine in an Indian headdress (from the New Girl).

Baseball News: This year’s flag-desecration caps for July 4 have now been officially released. Those are the only two photos available, but they confirm SB Nation’s earlier report that the American League teams will have red crowns and navy brims, and the N.L. will have vicey-versey. We could critique these on all sorts of aesthetic grounds (the design is too busy, teams like the A’s and Giants will look like shit because they don’t have blue or red in their color schemes, Yankees will look odd with red crowns, Astros will look odd with a star upon a star, etc.), but that misses the point, which is that there’s no need for special “U! S! A!” caps in the first place. … A recent “Open Carry rally” in Texas featured several long gun-toting rallyers wearing Texas Rangers jerseys and T-shirts. … Reprinted from Monday’s comments: Four years ago I wrote an ESPN piece about a faux-flannel baseball uniform fabric that Under Armour had developed. Looks like Rawlings is now offering something similar. … Brian Wulff was looking through some of his father’s stuff and came across a scorecard and ticket stub from the first home game in Mets history. … While looking for something else, I came across this photo of Bob Boone and was immediately struck with this thought of, “Yup, that was his mask.” I associate that single-bar style with him. Was he the last one to wear it? … Very nice uniforms for Lemont High School in Illinois (from Bill Hupp). … Vanderbilt is wearing “JCW” decals on their cleats and batting helmets in memory of Clyde Walker, a long time associate director at Vanderbilt whose son is a student manager for the baseball team (from Jeff LeCraw). … The Phillies and Cubs will wear 1964 throwbacks this Friday. Vendors will be retro-attired as well. And the Phillies — but not the Cubs, I’m pretty sure — will wear the ’64 throwbacks again on Sunday. … Batman-themed jerseys on tap for the Lehigh Valley IronPigs (thanks, Phil). … This is interesting: The ticket clerks at Safeco Field have a chart that shows which parts of the stadium will be in sunlight and shade at various times of day throughout the season. So simple, and so sensible — wish every team did this (big thanks to Daniel Carroll). … Nelson Cruz of the Orioles suffered a serious pant tear last night. Meanwhile, his teammate David Lough, who usually goes low-cuffed, went high-cuffed with black/orange socks (from Brian Mazmanian and Bryan Duklewski, respectively). … Love this little 1960s Cubs decal, although it’s too bad about the Texaco logo (thanks, Phil).

NFL News: The Broncos’ old bucking horsey logo works surprisingly well on a graffiti-covered van (from Denver Gregg). … Dig this: a 49ers-themed birdhouse! Looks like it might scare the birds, though. That same Etsy seller has all sorts of sports-themed items (from Jay Sullivan). … At Jags OTAs, some players wear shorts while others wear old game pants that have been hemmed up high (from Clint Richardson).

College Football News: Here’s how the Big XII logo will look on the Longhorns’ jersey (thanks, Phil). … New gear for Nebraska: warm-ups and coach’s pullover (from Warren Junium). … The 2013 Iron Bowl was shown on ESPNU yesterday, and Auburn punter Steven Clark was losing one of his helmet logo decals (from Clint Richardson).

Hockey News: In last week’s ESPN column, I noted that the Rangers’ jerseys are unusual because they don’t have a crest. Adrian Acosta wonders if that might be a competitive advantage: “I own a bunch of Rangers Jerseys and they fit like a T-shirt — no bunching up, not too heavy, etc.,” he says. “I’ve tried on other teams’ jerseys at the NHL Store and have been annoyed by the big crests. When you sit down, they are stiff and bunch up on your lap. Does this affect the players? Do equipment managers have a special way of washing the jerseys that makes the crests more pliable?” … USA Hockey has endorsed the “look up line,” which is sort of like a warning track for hockey. … If you go to this page and seach on the term “second movie,” you’ll see a good description of how the Mighty Ducks’ uniforms were designed by the Disney movie costume department (from Eric Romain).

NBA News: I have seen next season’s Christmas Day uniforms, and I can tell you this much: Unlike last year’s designs, they don’t have sleeves. And unlike the previous year’s designs, you can actually read the letting and numbering. … With the Clippers apparently poised to enter a new ownership era, should they get a new look, or even a new name? … “When coming back from commercials during the NBA Finals, ESPN and ABC use a graphic featuring an animated basketball that’s shot and rolls around a rim before the Goodyear blimp comes and tips it in,” says Josh Williams. “It looks simple enough, they’ve been using it for years. But the ball they use in the ad is the ball design that was introduced in 2006 and then pulled. I guess they either figured they could get away with it or they just forgot.”

Soccer News: Adidas is selling the World Cup ball for $160. Acccording to the third graf of this story, the Pakistani women who make the ball are paid only $100 per month. “Disgusting,” says John Flanagan. … Pure gold here: the World Cup uniform regulations. Further info here (thanks, Phil). … Latest media outlet to do a ranking of World Cup uniforms: GQ magazine (Phil again). … American soccer fans are adopting foreign rituals and traditions into their rooting culture. … Puma is having trouble keeping up with Adidas and Nike (thanks again, Phil). … New for this World Cup: vuvuzelas are out, caxirolas are in. … And here are the fan chants you can expect to hear at the Cup (Phil again). … Here’s another interactive inforgrpahic showing World Cup jerseys through history and a series of team-specific World Cup infographic posters (from Brian Tyacke and Phil, respectively). … Another article on the competition between World Cup kit manufacturers. … According to this article, the Rio de Janeiro airport features “plenty of porters in maroon uniforms hoping to persuade gullible tourists to illegally exchange dollars and euros for [Brazilian] reals.” … If you always wanted to see Cristiano Renaldo trying on a New York Jets helmet, today’s your lucky day. … New kit for Celtic FC (Phil again). … Brazil’s Catholic church is threatening a lawsuit over an Italian commercial that shows the famous “Christ the Redeemer” statue in an Italian soccer jersey.

Grab Bag: Just what the world’s been waiting for: a bike helmet that works like a mood ring. … Here’s the helmet design for the Ohio-Michigan Border Classic, a new high school football all-star game (from Steve Lemke). … Dig this: Nike commissioned a statue of Rafael Nadal made of French Open clay (thanks, Phil). … Hundreds of knitters will be decorating Cambridge, England, with Tour de France mini-jerseys. … Many Canadian citizens are wearing red in honor of three Mounties who were recently killed in the line of duty. … New logo for Milwaukee’s Park East Corridor. … Coca-Cola is producing a series of bottles with the Coke brand name replaced by slogans and popular first names.

 

188 comments to Up (with) the Establishment!, continued

  • Steve | June 11, 2014 at 7:55 am |

    The Mariners have October listed on their shade map. Wishful thinking.

    • Jim Vilk | June 11, 2014 at 11:58 am |

      I love the idea of a shade map! I already know where to sit in the shade at PNC Park, but if I ever make it to Camden Yards or Skydome or wherever, it’d be nice to have a heads up before I buy my tickets.

    • TBone | June 11, 2014 at 12:10 pm |

      I was just thinking the same thing. As a Mariner fan for the last three decades, I find this greatly amusing.

  • Jimbo | June 11, 2014 at 8:05 am |

    Two questions about the Etsy seller (posted in the NFL ticker):
    1) Why are the logos poorly attached with tape?
    2) How long before the NFL, NCAA, etc. issue a cease & desist order to that seller.

    • Dumb Guy | June 11, 2014 at 8:53 am |

      1) Probably cuz they are semi generic color combos that could be fudged into several teams as needed.

      2) Hopefully soon. I have a *thing* for people that sell unlicensed stuff.

    • Tom V. | June 11, 2014 at 9:32 am |

      What is the rule for selling homemade things with logos on them? I sidestep the issue by selling items I make in team colors, without logos.

      • Dumb Guy | June 11, 2014 at 10:14 am |

        You’d be surprised what color combinations are also protected. Or at least combos that are marketed as being from a specific city that is likely intended to represent a particular team. Sounds crazy, I know.

      • Tom V. | June 11, 2014 at 12:21 pm |

        What if someone buys all the parts and pieces to make a Mets jersey for themselves. Have they broken any laws? What if they make a jersey or item that is unavailable anywhere else for themselves? What if they try to sell a one-off item with logos and things? Just curious, as obviously we’ve seen such things on etsy, as well as homemade jerseys and cornhole boards and things on this site.

      • BvK1126 | June 11, 2014 at 1:45 pm |

        “What is the rule for selling homemade things with logos on them? I sidestep the issue by selling items I make in team colors, without logos.”

        Generally speaking, selling a homemade item with a sports team logo on it is probably a trademark violation. One important question to ask is where did you get the logo? Did you buy it? Or did you print it off the internet or otherwise get it for free?

        The reason that question is important is that if it’s an officially licensed product like an embroidered logo patch or an iron-on decal, presumably a manufacturer who has been granted a trademark license by the team or league produced it, got paid for their product, and then paid the trademark owner appropriate royalties under the license. Since you paid for it, you can do what you want with the product, such as selling it (usually as-is) to someone else.

        Of course, if sewing a logo patch (even one you bought yourself) on a t-shirt and selling it means you are directly competing against t-shirts produced by licensed manufacturers, then you could be violating the trademark owner’s rights.

        Selling a single t-shirt with a sewn-on logo patch probably wouldn’t result in litigation. But buying those same patches in bulk, sewing them onto a bunch of t-shirts, and turning it into a regularly recurring moneymaking venture would be much more likely to attract scrutiny.

        The main way to avoid trademark violations is to not affix a logo to your homemade product. You could possibly sell the logo patch or decal separately to the same buyer. But you’d probably want to keep the transaction separate. You could also possibly charge to sew the logo onto the product yourself as a separate service. But if you combine them all these products and services into the same transaction, you’re probably selling unlicensed merchandise.

        Someone selling an item in team colors without additional identifying phrases or information probably does not need to worry about violating trademarks.

        I’m guessing the reason the etsy seller taped the team logos onto his photographs is because he is selling the final product without the logo. (Looking at his listings, it looks like he is following the whole “decal sold separately” procedure.) The one area where he is subjecting himself to scrutiny is advertising his products using the logos. He is obviously meaning to have someone buy his homemade items and team logo decals together.

        • Anthony | June 11, 2014 at 4:29 pm |

          [quote] The one area where he is subjecting himself to scrutiny is advertising his products using the logos. He is obviously meaning to have someone buy his homemade items and team logo decals together.[/quote]

          That’s probably a violation of Section 43(a) of the Lanham Act.

  • BurghFan | June 11, 2014 at 8:18 am |

    I’m surprised to see the Phillies celebrating 1964. I guess enough of the current fanbase doesn’t bear the scars.

    • ChrisH | June 11, 2014 at 2:00 pm |

      What? No double-header on Father’s Day? BOO!

      • ChrisH | June 11, 2014 at 2:52 pm |

        Sorry for the misplaced apostrophe.

  • Gazzoo | June 11, 2014 at 8:20 am |

    Not counting a multiple-combo team, like the 70s and 80s Pirates, this year’s Cubs have to be setting the record for most different unis worn in a season…alts, 9 home throwbacks, holiday and special occasion variations (camos, Jackie Robinson Day, 4th of July, etc), and now these road throwbacks…

    • JTH | June 11, 2014 at 9:45 am |

      It’s a shame that I’d rather pass a kidney stone than watch Cubs baseball this season. They have been looking mighty dapper in these throwback unis.

  • Ted Nik | June 11, 2014 at 8:26 am |

    $215 for a ticket to see the first N.Y. Mets’s game in history? It would appear that the current relative value of $215.00 from 1962 ranges from $1,280.00 to $5,970.00. Amazin’!

    • BurghFan | June 11, 2014 at 8:59 am |

      Like Stan says below, that’s the price of the season ticket, not one game.

  • Toddro | June 11, 2014 at 8:27 am |

    I vote for the aroused penguin logo.

    • Dumb Guy | June 11, 2014 at 8:53 am |

      QOTD.

  • Hodges14 | June 11, 2014 at 8:31 am |

    That 49ers birdhouse reminds me of the Money for Nothing video characters.

  • Connie DC | June 11, 2014 at 8:34 am |

    I really like many of The Establishment entries, and some that I liked the most didn’t make it to the finals. Denver Gregg’s summoning of Orwell is a wonderful conceit (“If you want a vision of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a human face – forever”), and written with DG’s customary tart erudition. But imo The Establishment is a different, oilier, animal. A smooth natty beast with no need for rough stuff. Which is well captured, I think, by Anthony Scandiffio’s headless exec or John Cutter’s skyscraper as well as by John Muir’s briefcase. High median grade for all entries.

  • Chip | June 11, 2014 at 8:34 am |

    I like the Independence Day caps. Might not be ideal for every team, but it’s nice to commemorate and celebrate the holiday.

    • Chance Michaels | June 11, 2014 at 10:40 am |

      We need caps to do that?

      • Chip | June 11, 2014 at 12:58 pm |

        You don’t “need” caps anymore than you “need” fireworks or parade. That doesn’t mean they are bad.

        • Chance Michaels | June 11, 2014 at 1:29 pm |

          No, but fireworks and parades don’t throw out the teams’ own unique visual histories. That is bad.

          Further conflating patriotism with consumerism is bad, too.

        • Chip | June 11, 2014 at 1:49 pm |

          Teams don’t seem to have much trouble tinkering with their unique visual histories on a near daily basis. It’s not like there aren’t team elements in the caps.

          the patriotism and consumerism thing went out the window long, long, long ago. People LIKE to buy patriotic items, or they wouldn’t be buying them.

        • BrianC | June 11, 2014 at 3:54 pm |

          Just a bad design.

        • Phil Hecken | June 11, 2014 at 6:32 pm |

          “People LIKE to buy patriotic items, or they wouldn’t be buying them.”

          ~~~

          1. Not everyone does.
          2. Not buying them does not, contrary to the thoughts of many, make them “bad” Americans.
          3. The caps look like shit. If they want to sell them to those who LIKE to buy patriotic stuff, that’s fine — but those caps don’t need to go on a baseball field.

          4. With all that said, I’d rather they wear those, coupled with the (not-to-be-worn) America Fuck Yeah jerseys, on the 4th of July, than to have ANY camo ever worn on the diamond, and ESPECIALLY not on Memorial Day.

    • Lee | June 11, 2014 at 12:44 pm |

      You spelled ‘monetize and desecrate’ wrong.

      Lee

      • Chip | June 11, 2014 at 1:01 pm |

        Nothing has been desecrated. It’s not like they’re cutting up actual flags. Flag imagery is everywhere.

        • Chance Michaels | June 11, 2014 at 1:30 pm |

          “is everywhere”

          Doesn’t make it any more right. Only commonplace.

        • Chip | June 11, 2014 at 1:52 pm |

          We are free to disagree.

        • Chance Michaels | June 11, 2014 at 4:34 pm |

          But of course! That’s even more American than cheapening the flag through commerce. ;)

        • Chip | June 11, 2014 at 5:58 pm |

          I guess I don’t see this as cheapening the flag. For one thing, it’s not a flag. Not everything with a stars and stripes design is a flag. Does the Yankees logo cheapen the flag because of the Uncle Sam cap design?

  • Dumb Guy | June 11, 2014 at 8:46 am |

    “…on the cover of the UK edition of Elle magazine in an Indian headdress (from the New Girl).”

    From the New Girl?? MmmHmmm. Yeah, right.
    ;^)

    • Paul Lukas | June 11, 2014 at 9:13 am |

      She actually works at Elle (American version, not UK).

  • stan gable | June 11, 2014 at 8:48 am |

    I think the $215 price on the mets ticket is for the season.

  • timmy b | June 11, 2014 at 8:59 am |

    I’ve been following soccer since the mid-1970’s. I may be an ol’ stick in the mud about this, but I’ll continue to call it the field (not pitch), the roster (not squad), the standings (not table), the game (not match), a tie (not draw), nothing (not nil), include the word “kick” when describing a “corner” or a “penalty”, ejected (not sent off), a shutout (not clean sheet), the uniform (not the kit, though I fear I’m losing this one), the fans (not the supporters), the logo or emblem (not the badge), the cleats or shoes (not the boots or studs), the stadium (not the ground), the final (not full time), the score (not the result), among many, many other things. I will say I can accept the shirt as well as the jersey, as well, because it really IS more of a shirt than a jersey.

    God, I sound like such a curmudgeon. But, I don’t care. I’ve earned the right!

    • Chance Michaels | June 11, 2014 at 10:57 am |

      That’s the beauty of it. We have our own soccer culture, which includes a certain amount of idiosyncrasy.

      For my own part, I too have been following the sport since the 1970s (1976, New York Cosmos at Yankee Stadium). But I’ve adopted most of the terms you mention. Perhaps because after the fall of the NASL we didn’t have professional soccer here until a couple years ago, and the terminology had already stuck.

      Some of them, like “fans” and “supporters”, have taken on different meanings. I’d use “fans” to describe people who follow the team, buy some stuff, maybe take in a match or two a year. “Supporters,” on the other hand, join groups, buy a section’s worth of seats, travel to away matches, raise money for charity and otherwise shape the organization’s culture.

      • Phil Hecken | June 11, 2014 at 6:35 pm |

        ““Supporters,” on the other hand, join groups, buy a section’s worth of seats, travel to away matches, raise money for charity and otherwise shape the organization’s culture.”

        ~~~

        Sounds like an organized religion (with apologies to John Oliver)

    • Iain | June 11, 2014 at 11:30 am |

      Canadian with British parents who grew up with British coaches & watching matches with British commentators so I’m comfortable with either the North American or British terms. Cleats is the only term in your list that really bugs me.
      I can never understand why the US team always has to be referred to as the USMNT.

      • Chance Michaels | June 11, 2014 at 1:36 pm |

        “I can never understand why the US team always has to be referred to as the USMNT.”

        We’re unique among regular invitees to the World Cup, in which our women’s national team has been much more successful than the men’s. I wonder if that has something to do with it.

        • Iain | June 11, 2014 at 2:36 pm |

          I’m sure it does, but 99% of the time there would be no confusion between the men’s & women’s teams. The ‘NT’ is completely redundant. I suppose the next step is to make it the USMNST so as not to be confused with other sports.

    • George Chilvers | June 11, 2014 at 12:04 pm |

      You stick with it, Timmy.

      You have a democratic right to stand alone in the world and be wrong all the time – don’t let anyone take that away from you.

      And don’t let anyone tell you that the rest of the English speaking world uses the expressions you eschew. Even if we did invent the game. ;)

      • timmy b | June 11, 2014 at 4:26 pm |

        Bloody well right I will, George!! LOL!

      • Padday | June 11, 2014 at 8:00 pm |

        “Even if we did invent the game”

        Yes, in the 19th century the game of “football” was invented in many different English public schools. Though the rules were different from school to school the overwhelming number played a game which involved picking up a ball and running with it. The version of football which became the most popular including with the founding members of the FA (well, initially at least), that of Rugby school, spread across the globe including to America where over the years it would be developed into the game played by the modern NFL. Similarly, in Australia the term football retains the late Victorian meaning of a game derived from Rugby school’s rules. So kudos USA for staying true to the original meaning of the term football, its roots and its tradition.

    • Tom V. | June 11, 2014 at 12:25 pm |

      I don’t watch F1 or IndyCar much but it bugs the heck out of me when instead of saying something like “third race of the season” they say “third program on the circuit.” Nails on a chalkboard to me.

    • Jim Vilk | June 11, 2014 at 12:55 pm |

      Expecting Americans to say “pitch” and “nil” and “clean sheet” and so on is like expecting us to call a truck a lorry or a flashlight a torch. I’m with you, Timmy.

    • George Chilvers | June 11, 2014 at 2:09 pm |

      I’ve been watching a bit of the MLB that I can get on Youtube.

      I love it when the batsman swings the stick and runs right round the square in one go.

  • David | June 11, 2014 at 9:02 am |

    I like Gordon Blau’s designs… mostly for the shot he takes at Brandiose with the angry forward movement eye.

    • Jimbo | June 11, 2014 at 9:12 am |

      I also like Gordon’s “Blish” design. I feel it is the most likely to be worn by an official establishment team. Gordon showed great attention to detail, including the terrific Nike color name parody.

      I wish I could have voted Blish for the win!

    • Tom V. | June 11, 2014 at 9:23 am |

      Yeah, nail/head, especially with the font taken from currency. Well played.

    • Jeremiah | June 11, 2014 at 9:33 am |

      I liked the Blish design as well. I thought the amount of satire in it was great.

    • Chance Michaels | June 11, 2014 at 10:41 am |

      Count me in – can absolutely see Brandiose serving that up.

    • Gordon Blau | June 11, 2014 at 1:18 pm |

      I agree ;-)

    • Judy | June 11, 2014 at 5:06 pm |

      Blish would’ve gotten my vote, simply because of the eye. Well done.

  • tomasher | June 11, 2014 at 9:15 am |

    Boone and umpire Dutch Rennert were the last two behind the plate that wore that mask, from what I can recall… but I could be wrong.

    • mild bill | June 11, 2014 at 2:21 pm |

      I am not sure what type of mask he wore but I always got a kick out of how Dutch Rennert bellowed called strikes when he worked the plate.

    • ChrisH | June 11, 2014 at 2:33 pm |

      I can’t recall anyone BUT Boone wearing that mask in the ’70s and ’80s.

  • Johnny O | June 11, 2014 at 9:15 am |

    I am having a serious debate with a friend on flag desecration uniforms. I pointed him to the US Flag Code and said that the new MLB 4th of July caps are in direct violation of it. While he does agree with that, he pointed out that Olympic teams and World Cup teams use a crest with stars are stripes, and/or use flag elements on their uniforms.

    The flag code doesn’t directly mention this situation, so what is the ruling? They are obviously representing our country, but are not part of the military, police officers, or fire fighters.

    • Anthony | June 11, 2014 at 9:42 am |

      The flag code is voluntary.

      • mmwatkin | June 11, 2014 at 10:49 am |

        Yep. I never understood why so many people point to the Flag Code in this instance. It is not law.

        I think the MLB caps are stupid, but not because of US Flag Code.

        • BrianC | June 11, 2014 at 11:23 am |

          But we don’t have a Stupidity Code. I think we could use one sometimes…

        • arrScott | June 11, 2014 at 12:46 pm |

          Saying “please” and “thank you” ain’t the law either, and yet for some reason we teach our children to do so and we expect other adults to observe the courtesies. Of course the Flag Code is voluntary – and as much as I’m a stickler for it, I’d oppose most vehemently on First Amendment grounds any attempt to make it an actual enforceable law. But it’s a standard of conduct that has served us well for a century, so anyone who wants to throw it out the window because it’s, like, voluntary, man, needs a better reason than “look: shiny!”

      • BrianC | June 11, 2014 at 3:56 pm |

        More like “guidelines”?

    • Jeremiah | June 11, 2014 at 9:55 am |

      One of the big differences between the use of flag elements there is that the US national teams are representing the USA on a world stage. I think some leeway can be granted in their use of flag elements. It’s not a cash grab or pandering, IMHO. Also, in the case of USMNT (soccer) the crest they use (though much maligned on its aesthetics), has been pretty consistent. They aren’t redoing it year after year to sell more merch.

      • Paul Lukas | June 11, 2014 at 10:09 am |

        Also: Every member of the US Olympic team, US soccer team, etc. is, you know, American.

        • Phil Hecken | June 11, 2014 at 11:18 am |
        • El Duderino | June 11, 2014 at 12:49 pm |

          And don’t forget Tim Roth, Phil.
          http://www.youtube.c...

        • Judy | June 11, 2014 at 5:09 pm |

          If I had the opportunity to move to another country where I could be paid handsomely, and enjoy a much greater standard of living, because of my ability to play a game, I wouldn’t be the slightest bit offended to wear the colors of said country in observance of their national holidays.

      • Johnny O | June 11, 2014 at 10:50 am |

        I do get that point, but soccer kits change annually. Isn’t that the very definition of a money grab?

        • Chance Michaels | June 11, 2014 at 11:21 am |

          Sure as hell is.

          I think the USMNT gets a pass because they’re, well, the USMNT. Comprised exclusively of Americans representing their own country. Can’t say that about any of the pro teams.

          Not to mention that US Soccer is a non-profit. Their goal is to administer and grow the game in the United States, not funnel proceeds into private hands. That also makes a difference.

        • Johnny O | June 11, 2014 at 11:28 am |

          Good point Chance. So then where do the profits of USA soccer jerseys go to?

        • Phil Hecken | June 11, 2014 at 11:45 am |

          Sepp?

        • Chance Michaels | June 11, 2014 at 1:43 pm |

          The organization makes money, to be sure. Like every other non-profit in the nation.

          The money just goes back into the organization and its goals, instead of being distributed to the owners or shareholders.

        • terriblehuman | June 11, 2014 at 2:14 pm |

          Comprised exclusively of Americans representing their own country.

          Also, Germans with American sounding names.
          /I kid, I kid!

  • Nathan R | June 11, 2014 at 9:36 am |

    I don’t know if anyone else noticed this, but the star on the July 4th Flag Desecration Caps is cockeyed – which is highly reminiscent of the US World Baseball Classic Cap Logo. Almost as if they used that cap as a template, enlarging the star then adding the other logos on top of it.

  • JTH | June 11, 2014 at 9:39 am |

    In last week’s ESPN column, I noted that the Rangers’ jerseys are unusual because they don’t have a crest. Adrian Acosta wonders if that might be a competitive advantage: “I own a bunch of Rangers Jerseys and they fit like a T-shirt — no bunching up, not too heavy, etc.,” he says. “I’ve tried on other teams’ jerseys at the NHL Store and have been annoyed by the big crests. When you sit down, they are stiff and bunch up on your lap. Does this affect the players? Do equipment managers have a special way of washing the jerseys that makes the crests more pliable?”

    Well, the only time the players sit down is when they’re on the bench so I’m not sure how this could be an advantage/disadvantage.

    Also, unless you’re fully geared-up, it’s not really a valid comparison. The shoulder pads, elbow pads, pants, etc. make a big difference in how the jersey fits.

    I’ve played in jerseys that are blank, ones that are screen-printed and ones that have sewn-on crests and I can assure you that it doesn’t make any difference to me. I play just as poorly no matter what’s on the front of the sweater.

  • EddieAtari | June 11, 2014 at 9:45 am |

    Was never a fan of the Establishment, but kinda have a soft spot for the Tax Dodgers

    • Connie DC | June 11, 2014 at 10:07 am |

      Wonderful!

    • Anthony Nuccio | June 11, 2014 at 11:47 am |

      If only they had stirrups..

    • Chance Michaels | June 11, 2014 at 2:06 pm |

      I love that one of those made it into the Hall of Fame.

  • wayne | June 11, 2014 at 9:45 am |

    Thanks for letting us vote! I would have thought with a team like the Establishment, we would have gotten told which logo to like ;)

    • Jeremiah | June 11, 2014 at 9:58 am |

      Excellent point! I didn’t realize what I may be risking above by expressing an appreciation for a non-establishment choice (although I did vote, so don’t ban me, Establishment).

  • Mainspark | June 11, 2014 at 9:57 am |

    Now that we have had a design contest for the “establishment”, I eagerly await the follow-up competition for the “unwashed rabble.”

    • Ben Fortney | June 11, 2014 at 10:44 am |

      The “Prols”

    • Tom | June 11, 2014 at 11:36 am |

      The Huddled Masses

      • timmy b | June 11, 2014 at 10:31 pm |

        The 99%ers.

  • Matthew Lohr | June 11, 2014 at 10:06 am |

    I found it interesting in the article about the ‘Open Carry Texas’ that they mention immigration laws and the organization follows many of the Republican ideals… yet the two members pictured in the Rangers’ jersey are wearing a Yu Darvish (Japan) and Adrian Beltre (Dominican Republic)!

    …Oh the irony!

    • Ben Fortney | June 11, 2014 at 10:44 am |

      Taking jobs away from perfectly qualified American ballplayers.

    • ChrisH | June 11, 2014 at 1:50 pm |

      Can’t non-immigrant aliens can legally obtain firearms in Texas (and elsewhere in the US?) if they meet certain criteria?
      Darvish and Beltre both are in Texas legally and/or possess work visas, right?
      Who knows…maybe they are lawful gun owners?

  • EddieAtari | June 11, 2014 at 10:09 am |

    In response to Adrian Acosta’s inquiry: I played ice hockey for a few years. During pick-up games, I’d wear either lightweight blank practice jerseys, or sometimes break out my authentic Lady-Liberty sweater, which has a considerable crest in the front. With all the padding and equipment underneath, I never noticed any considerable difference in weight.

  • Gary | June 11, 2014 at 10:12 am |

    Damn the IronPigs and their jersey auctions. They keep costing me money. I bought one of their police themed jerseys (and the corresponding PawSox Firefighter jersey from that night) at auction a few weeks ago. But I absolutely have to have one of these. I’ve got a nice little jersey collection to hang down in my basement, but my wallet is crying.

  • teenchy | June 11, 2014 at 10:16 am |

    With the Clippers apparently poised to enter a new ownership era, should they get a new look, or even a new name?

    “Seattle SuperSonics” has a nice ring to it.

    • Jim Vilk | June 11, 2014 at 11:28 am |

      Not. Gonna. Happen.

      Wait for the Timberwolves, but there’s NO way the Clippers (or whatever they’re going to be called) are leaving LA.

      • Connie DC | June 11, 2014 at 11:52 am |

        It’s kinda predictable and all, but “LA Stars” sounds pretty good. And I don’t think the existence of the Dallas Stars detracts much.

        I mean, it’s fun to think of other candidates – LA Moguls, LA Freeways, LA Left Coasts, LA Surfs, LA Sycophants – but the Stars are within reach.

        • scottrj | June 11, 2014 at 1:54 pm |

          For better or worse, there’s been a Los Angeles Stars pro basketball team already.
          http://www.remembert...

  • mmwatkin | June 11, 2014 at 10:24 am |

    I am a little surprised that so many people went with a business themed interpretation of “The Establishment”. To me, a government themed logo would be much more appropriate. Not everyone relates the big business world to the establishment because not everyone is tied into it.

    I really like the concept of the eye of providence (or eye of god). I think when applied correctly, it could become a very strong logo & symbol of the establishment.

    • Paul Lukas | June 11, 2014 at 10:56 am |

      I am a little surprised that so many people went with a business themed interpretation of “The Establishment”. To me, a government themed logo would be much more appropriate.

      Perhaps people think government is largely captive to, and taking directives from, big business.

      • DenverGregg | June 11, 2014 at 11:09 am |

        . . . or the opposite and that business is just a tool used by big government, but that is closest and most visible to the oppressed.

        • Chance Michaels | June 11, 2014 at 2:14 pm |

          Nah, if that was the case then we’d have corporations bailing out the federal budget deficit. Or we’d have the government writing regulations, rather than letting the corporations do it.

          I understand the appeal of a “pox on both your houses” sentiment, but both parties in such a scenario have to have even the appearance of equivalence.

      • mmwatkin | June 11, 2014 at 11:44 am |

        As I was typing my original response, I had the same thought about the correlation of business and the influence on the government. Still, that connection is really a new one in the eyes of population in the grand scheme.

        Government and Religion have been the establishment to the masses for thousands of years. The Eye of Providence makes the connection to both and can be interpreted to either. In my mind, it makes it a very good symbol for “The Establishment”

        • Paul Lukas | June 11, 2014 at 12:29 pm |

          As I was typing my original response, I had the same thought about the correlation of business and the influence on the government. Still, that connection is really a new one in the eyes of population in the grand scheme.

          I suspect the robber barons of yore, and the people who held them in infamy, might disagree.

        • arrScott | June 11, 2014 at 12:51 pm |

          The Establishment may or may not control the state at any given time. But even when The Establishment does not overtly or directly control the state, it still exists and still exerts significant control on society – directly, through non-state means such as the marketplace and cultural production, and indirectly, through influence on the state. So it’s a mistake to conflate The Establishment with the government. The Establishment is not the throne, it is the power behind the throne.

        • Cort | June 11, 2014 at 12:57 pm |

          Eric Hoffer’s observation about America can’t be repeated often enough: “Every great cause begins as a movement, becomes a business,and eventually degenerates into a racket.”

          Nor de Tocqueville’s: “…I know of no other country where love of money has such a grip on men’s hearts or where stronger scorn is expressed for the theory of permanent equality of property.”

          Patriotism, Nationalism, Religion, Culture: it’s always boiled down to “Will someone pay money for this?”

        • Paul Lukas | June 11, 2014 at 12:59 pm |

          “Every great cause begins as a movement, becomes a business,and eventually degenerates into a racket.”

          This was, essentially, the theme of last night’s Uni Watch 15th-anniversary party.

        • arrScott | June 11, 2014 at 6:10 pm |

          Does Movement > Business > Racket correspond to that other famous dicta that “History repeats itself, first as tragedy, then as farce”? Business = Tragedy, Racket = Farce?

        • Cort | June 11, 2014 at 6:39 pm |

          Yes. They are twin rails.

          Solidarity in Poland is a good example. 1980: Thrilling, inspiring, Nobel-worthy. 1981: Tragically crushed by Jaruzelski. 1989: Walesa fully in power, and shows the world why inspirational union leaders don’t necessarily make good heads of state. Farce. (and Racket: they marketed the heck out of “Solidarnosc”).

    • Oleg Kvasha | June 11, 2014 at 4:45 pm |

      The “Politician”, “G-Man”, “Banker”, and the “CEO” all look the same in the dark suit. A briefcase is utilitarian in both world, one holds money and one holds secrets. Trying to pry the two worlds apart, aesthetically especially here ind DC, is pretty much impossible.

      So, can’t the Suit the uniform of both?

  • Chance Michaels | June 11, 2014 at 11:05 am |

    Reprinted from Monday’s comments: Four years ago I wrote an ESPN piece about a faux-flannel baseball uniform fabric that Under Armour had developed. Looks like Rawlings is now offering something similar.

    Rawlings has actually been experimenting with this for a while. Last year the Brooklyn Cyclones had an event for the 100th anniversary of Ebbets Field’s opening, and wore 1913-inspired uniforms. You can see in the team’s original rendering that the jerseys had a flannel texture to them. Rawlings created this look by sublimating a digicamo-like pattern into the material. Looks like they’ve come a long way in the intervening year.

  • Mike Engle | June 11, 2014 at 11:07 am |

    I actually really Jeff Hannaford’s tie design, but I voted for John Muir’s suitcase.

    • walter | June 11, 2014 at 11:25 am |

      I used to be an eager contributor to contests like these, but now I’m an old fart who just criticizes things. I have to admit I had trouble wrapping my head around representing a team that I’m supposed to fear. How about a “Logo Redacted” box?

  • BrianC | June 11, 2014 at 11:25 am |

    “The singer Pharrell Williams has issued an apology after appearing on the cover of the UK edition of Elle magazine in an Indian headdress”

    I’m just sick of people apologizing for everything.

    • Dumb Guy | June 11, 2014 at 11:34 am |

      It’s better than that other stupid hat he wears.

      • Phil Hecken | June 11, 2014 at 11:44 am |

        He doesn’t seem happy.

    • Paul Lukas | June 11, 2014 at 12:29 pm |

      Why are you sick of it? Shouldn’t we be more sick of people doing tasteless, insensitive things in the first place?

      • BrianC | June 11, 2014 at 4:00 pm |

        That was sort of my point. They do idiotic things and make it all better by saying they’re sorry. Maybe if they thought in the first place they wouldn’t have to.

    • Adam N. | June 11, 2014 at 2:01 pm |

      The Pharell ‘incident’ brings up an interesting point/angle. The article states that he has previously ‘claimed’ to have Native American heritage. If that’s true, shouldn’t that mean he can ‘get away’ with wearing it?

      If not, who gets to decide who can ‘appropriate’ a cultural symbol/item?

      Can I as a Christian raise a ruckus and demand a public apology if I see a heathen rock star wearing a cross necklace?

      • neeko | June 11, 2014 at 2:16 pm |

        Great point

      • terriblehuman | June 11, 2014 at 2:20 pm |

        If not, who gets to decide who can ‘appropriate’ a cultural symbol/item?

        It’s up to the individual. But the public gets to tell people, “Hey, it’s kind of a dick move to dress up like a cartoon Indian chief” and try to have a conversation about the appropriateness of cultural imagery.

        And if Pharrell does indeed have Native American heritage, then it brings up another issue, minstrelsy.

        Can I as a Christian raise a ruckus and demand a public apology if I see a heathen rock star wearing a cross necklace?

        You can demand pretty much anything you want. Whether you have a legitimate argument is another matter. (FWIW, I find overt display of religiosity kinda tacky).

      • BvK1126 | June 11, 2014 at 2:31 pm |

        “Can I as a Christian raise a ruckus and demand a public apology if I see a heathen rock star wearing a cross necklace?”

        Yes, you can, actually. It’s part of your free speech rights in this country.

        Does that mean other Christians are going to join you? Possibly. You’re not the first Christian to express concern about people’s motivations behind wearing a cross. Michael W. Smith
        even wrote a song about it.

        It’s not that unheard of for Christian organizations to make their voices heard when they feel someone has offended them. I remember protests outside of movie theaters when The Last Temptation of Christ and The Da Vinci Code came out.

        But as a Christian, why would you want to take the side of the person who is being insensitive to another culture’s deeply-held traditions and standards? Especially a culture that has been marginalized? Wouldn’t the more Christ-like thing to do be to extend compassion and understanding to the ones who don’t represent the status quo?

      • Paul Lukas | June 11, 2014 at 2:39 pm |

        1) Can you identify any “heathen rock stars” who wear cross necklaces?

        2) Christians are not a marginalized class. (In fact, heathens are, but that’s another issue.)

        • Jim Vilk | June 11, 2014 at 2:59 pm |

          I don’t know if you can call her a heathen, but Madonna wore a rosary (which has a cross on it) as a necklace. It’s meant for prayer…it’s not jewelry. That would be like you wearing a native headdress to a ball game.

        • Paul Lukas | June 11, 2014 at 3:38 pm |

          Madonna is (or at least was — not sure of her current status) a practicing Catholic.

          That said, her use of Catholic and Christian imagery has long been controversial, such her 1989 Pepsi commercial, which sparked an anti-Pepsi boycott movement. Pepsi then terminated her endorsement contract.

          So, in short: Yes, heathen rock stars who use Christian imagery can cause at least as much outrage as a headdress-wearing singer on the cover of a fashion magazine.

        • Jim Vilk | June 11, 2014 at 3:41 pm |

          I think she’s a Kabbalah-ist now. But she wasn’t when she wore the rosary.

        • Cort | June 11, 2014 at 6:30 pm |

          Madonna said that her use of the crucifix was part of her effort to divorce herself from Catholicism: it was pretty clear, from her numerous interviews on the subject, that her use of the crucifix was meant to diminish, not assert the Christian faith.

        • Paul Lukas | June 11, 2014 at 6:44 pm |

          Interesting.

          In any case, it doesn’t change the fact that she faced public backlash for this. So the original commenter’s implicit suggestion that there’s a double-standard is still false.

      • scottrj | June 11, 2014 at 3:10 pm |

        Seems to me Elle magazine bears the brunt of the responsibility for this whole dust-up. They’re who commissioned the photo shoot, they’re who (supposedly) encouraged him to wear the headdress, and they’re who ultimately made the editorial judgment call to plaster the photo on the magazine cover. It’s not as if Pharrell was going around seeking a forum in which to don symbolic Indian attire – instead, the forum sought him out.

        It’s also not as if there isn’t a long tradition of pop music performers appropriating from other cultures not only artistically, but stylistically as well, and, relatively speaking, much more mindlessly & gratuitously than Pharrell. Hell, Cher never claimed to be of Indian extraction – that is, until she came under fire for perpetrating this:
        http://www.youtube.c...
        (Which I guess makes her the Lone Star Dietz of pop music). Nor does Pharrell donning Indian headdress even remotely compare to this exercise in cultural embarrassment:
        http://www.youtube.c...

        Call him naïve, insensitive, what have you, but this whole “incident” is of no more than trifling significance.

        • Cort | June 11, 2014 at 6:35 pm |

          The Boy Scouts have an award they give to adult volunteers (I think it’s the highest award an area council can give). It’s called “The Silver Beaver”. It’s hard to believe that no one in that organization ever stopped to say, “Listen, fellas — our clientele is 13 year old boys. Thirteen year old boys can’t hear the word “beaver” without giggling uncontrollably. There are a lot of beasts in the forest: let’s call it the Silver Chipmunk or something.” (“The Silver Beaver” sounds like an all-geriatric strip club.)

          It’s the same here: it’s hard to believe, in a room full of supposedly intelligent and au courant professionals, no one said, “Gee, maybe we oughta ditch the Native American stuff. It’s kind of a hot topic these days.”

      • BrianC | June 11, 2014 at 4:01 pm |

        “Can I as a Christian raise a ruckus and demand a public apology if I see a heathen rock star wearing a cross necklace?”

        No, but you can wear a crown of thorns. I don’t recommend it, though.

  • BrianC | June 11, 2014 at 11:30 am |

    “Many Canadian citizens are wearing red in honor of three Mounties who were recently killed in the line of duty.”

    I wish I’d known, I would have worn red even though I’m not Canadian.

  • Jim Vilk | June 11, 2014 at 11:32 am |

    “When coming back from commercials during the NBA Finals, ESPN and ABC use a graphic featuring an animated basketball that’s shot and rolls around a rim before the Goodyear blimp comes and tips it in,” says Josh Williams.

    And for at least four years that blimp has been committing offensive goaltending. The ball is still above the cylinder when Blimpy tips it in. No basket, possession goes to the opponent.

  • Eric Romain | June 11, 2014 at 11:39 am |

    That 40″ ‘look-up-line’ in hockey seems like it would have no impact on safety. A dangerous head first board collision is nothing like baseball where your running backwards watching a pop fly. In hockey you’re already facing the boards in this situation. Even as a hitter there’s never a point where you aren’t aware of the boards unless you are skating around with your head down which is a recipe for a big injury to begin with.

  • Eric Romain | June 11, 2014 at 11:45 am |

    I agree that a hockey crest can feel bulky and a Pens crest would restrict the wrinkleability much more than the Rangers’ individual letters. I’m not sure that gives an advantage though, the players already have a stiff chest pad from their shoulders pads that I suspect restricts motion much worse than a thin piece of stiff fabric.

  • Anthony Nuccio | June 11, 2014 at 11:50 am |

    The crest on my Blackhawks jersey can feel heavy at some points, which is why I don’t wear it too often when the weather gets warmer, when I skate, etc. However, it doesn’t really bother me during the winter months or when I’m out and about during cold weather. I’m also interested to find out if they soften the crests before games or not. Part of me says no because I think the crest can give a little bit of protection in addition to padding, but I could be wrong.

  • Mike Engle | June 11, 2014 at 11:55 am |

    IF the Rangers get an advantage for having a lighter non-crested jersey (big “if”), then they give it back for not having a crest that can’t help but be a bull’s eye for opposing shooters, resulting in easier saves.
    #RelativelyRemoteHypothesis

    • mike 2 | June 11, 2014 at 5:51 pm |

      Mike, its not a remote hypothesis, its solid science. Proven on the internet and everything.

      http://www.uni-watch...

  • Jim Vilk | June 11, 2014 at 12:05 pm |

    Let’s see…down 3-0 in this series, last Cup win was ’94, last one before that was ’40…and people are seriously discussing whether the Rangers have a competitive advantage??

  • Too Tall Paul | June 11, 2014 at 12:05 pm |

    … Good article on how a lifelong ’Skins fan changed his mind and now things the team’s name should be changed.

    Small typo – need to swap thinks for things.

  • Phil Hecken | June 11, 2014 at 12:16 pm |

    MLB S&S Jerseys. Um, yeah…

    Actually, it kinda works for the Texases.

    • Paul Lukas | June 11, 2014 at 12:33 pm |

      I’m not convinced these are going to be worn on the field. They’re only selling cheap replicas, not authentics, among other yellow flags.

      I have a contact at MLB who’s checking on it for me. He knew nothing about the jerseys until I told him about them, which furthers my hunch that these will not be worn on the field.

      • Paul Lukas | June 11, 2014 at 12:43 pm |

        As I suspected: MLB confirms that the stars/stripes jerseys are NOT being worn on the field.

        • Phil Hecken | June 11, 2014 at 12:57 pm |

          Phew!

        • Thomas J | June 11, 2014 at 12:58 pm |

          That’s a huge relief.

      • BvK1126 | June 11, 2014 at 2:36 pm |

        “They’re only selling cheap replicas”

        $79.99 is still way more than I would pay for something like that.

    • arrScott | June 11, 2014 at 12:54 pm |

      Wait, looking at the examples, I get that one of the S’s in “S&S” stands for “smallpox.” What does the other S stand for?

  • Cort | June 11, 2014 at 12:51 pm |

    I like a lot of the ESTABLISHMENT logos, but I sort of think that the Establishment doesn’t need a jackbooted logo assert its authority: they’d used something banal, something that gave the masses some sad sense of comfort. Or they’d go with something Great Leadery, something you could genuflect to.

    I’m thinking that cartoon bear from the 1984 Summer Olympics, or Brittany Spears in a Catholic schoolgirl getup, or Concrete Jesus in a soccer jersey. (Although the angry All-Seeing eye was a work of genius.)

  • George N | June 11, 2014 at 12:51 pm |

    That tickets stub for the first Mets home game has an interlocking NY that attempts to replicate the logo on the caps. Not very well, mind you, but it tries. It’s a little detail that got lost somewhere down the road because every logo afterwards had just a plain NY.

    http://www.uni-watch...

    http://content.sport...

    • Ben Fortney | June 11, 2014 at 1:34 pm |

      I also noticed that there’s a seam on the baseball that eventually disappeared, but not until after 1978.

      • Steve D | June 11, 2014 at 1:48 pm |

        Don’t get me started…the true Met logo is and should be EXACTLY the one on that original program. The current logo they use today has several issues that in my mind deface the original art. Would you tweak the Mona Lisa?

        • Chance Michaels | June 11, 2014 at 2:22 pm |

          I actually think it’s stronger without the seam line. It’s not necessary, and clutters up an already-busy logo.

          As for their “tweaks” to the rest of the logo, I stand with Todd Radom on those.

  • arrScott | June 11, 2014 at 12:55 pm |

    Pat Smith’s take on The Establishment is pretty much perfect. As in, I could see a consumer brand adopting Pat’s logo as-is and succeeding.

  • Gusto4044 | June 11, 2014 at 12:59 pm |

    ESPN’s Keith Olbermann recently offered a compromise solution to the Redskins controversy. Switch the nickname to “Americans”, but keep everything else, including the logo(and by inference), uniforms as well.

    My hunch is this won’t be enough to satisfy everyone, they’ll want the logo scrubbed. The next controversy will be over the Blackhawks, Chiefs, and Braves.

    • Dumb Guy | June 11, 2014 at 1:27 pm |

      What about Natives? No, seriously. Is that offensive or simply descriptive?

      Thoughts? Anyone? Bueller?

      • Valjean | June 11, 2014 at 2:29 pm |

        Not bad — except (if you go back far enough) no one is really a “native”. Fairly well-established that those we call “indigenous” came over a land bridge from Asia. Certainly more “native” than paler-skinned Europeans who came later, but still a relative term.

        Olbermann’s being cute, but American Indians rather predate their adjective — and I seriously doubt they’d be honored.

        (/canofworms)

      • Chance Michaels | June 11, 2014 at 2:33 pm |

        No.

        I’m working with the NYCFC supporters’ group, and when they were discussing names, “the Natives” came up. A lot. I know where the name’s proponents were coming from, but the notion was so incomprehensively tone-deaf we had to kill it immediately.

        • BvK1126 | June 11, 2014 at 3:15 pm |

          Chance, the server for the image you linked to apparently doesn’t allow hotlinking. Could you possibly find another source for it?

          (Am I right to guess it was something similar to this?)

        • Chance Michaels | June 11, 2014 at 3:27 pm |

          Yep, that’s the one.

        • 716 Scott | June 11, 2014 at 4:00 pm |

          The Natives would be such a great name for a supporters group if everyone understood the reference. Chance what other names are in the running?

        • Chance Michaels | June 11, 2014 at 4:37 pm |

          We’ve already held the vote, and the group is known as the Third Rail.

          http://www.thirdrail...

        • BvK1126 | June 11, 2014 at 5:00 pm |

          “The Natives would be such a great name for a supporters group if everyone understood the reference.”

          I’m not sure understanding the reference makes it all that much better.

          http://en.wikipedia....

    • Bud | June 11, 2014 at 2:37 pm |

      I like it just because then it’ll mean DC will have the Americans and the Nationals…the Nationals play in the National League, and the Americans would play in the American Foot…oh wait.

  • Cort | June 11, 2014 at 1:01 pm |

    The weird white eyespots makes Phil and Marty look like a couple of X-Men, equipped with laser vision.

  • Michael Hersh | June 11, 2014 at 1:06 pm |

    Bill Simmons on ESPN had a podcast recently where he hoped the Clips change name to the Hollywood Stars

  • Michael Hersh | June 11, 2014 at 1:14 pm |

    I laugh when people think there’s no way the Clippers move to Seattle.

    Reasons not to move LA to Seattle:
    1. Big market to smaller market.
    2. 30 year history of team and city.
    3. Promise from owner that he won’t move team.

    Also known as the top 3 reasons for Seattle Sonics not to move to OKC.

    I think a Clippers move to Seattle is unlikely but I wouldn’t be surprised if it happened.

    • Jim Vilk | June 11, 2014 at 2:51 pm |

      If they were still in San Diego I’d be nodding in agreement. Or any big city other than NY or LA.

      Unlike the NFL, which doesn’t *need* NY or LA to succeed or even have a team, the NBA and ABC think they need them. As bad as the Lakers and Knicks were this year, when they played each other they got a coveted spot on network TV that should have gone to the Spurs or some other deserving team.

      I think if they showcased good teams no matter where they are they might surprise themselves and get better ratings, but for now they think the whole country would rather watch Carmelo and Kobe, even if their teams are shadows of their former selves.

      Laugh all you want, but the Clippers aren’t going anywhere. If they keep getting better and the Lakers keep imploding, they’d be fools to leave. Now if the league has a sudden change of philosophy, then I’ll laugh with you.

      • Phil Hecken | June 11, 2014 at 7:04 pm |

        “Unlike the NFL, which doesn’t *need* NY or LA to succeed or even have a team, the NBA and ABC think they need them.”

        ~~~

        Dude, I know what you’re saying, and yes, New Jersey isn’t actually in New York (contrary to what certain Miss America contestants may believe), but don’t say or even imply that NY doesn’t have a football team. Giants Stadium is seven miles from Midtown.

        • Rob S | June 11, 2014 at 7:17 pm |

          Yep, they may be across the state line, but they’re still in the New York City market. Hell, they’re closer to the city core than some same-state suburban teams!

        • Jim Vilk | June 11, 2014 at 10:13 pm |

          That’s not what I meant. This time…

          I just meant, the LA teams moved and the league hummed along. If the Giants and Jets moved to another region, the league would still hum along. I’m not saying it wouldn’t hurt them, just less than it would for other leagues.

  • Poisso3 | June 11, 2014 at 1:48 pm |

    And the Astros 2014 Stars and Stripes cap has been found: http://shop.mlb.com/...

    Talk about a swing and a miss on something that should have been a homerun…

    • BvK1126 | June 11, 2014 at 2:47 pm |

      Yeah, the circle around Houston’s logo feels like a cheat.

    • Dan J | June 11, 2014 at 3:12 pm |

      Yikes…$37.99 for that piece of sh*t???

    • arrScott | June 11, 2014 at 3:25 pm |

      Holy cow, so they took the flag-star, and superimposed the Dallas Cowboys logo on top of it, and then stuck an H for Houston on top of that. That’s quality design acumen right there, is what that is.

      • Chance Michaels | June 11, 2014 at 3:30 pm |

        That hideous logo actually comes from their BP cap. Ugly.

        • Poisso3 | June 11, 2014 at 3:53 pm |

          Yeah, and it looks like only the Astros were forced to use their BP cap logo.

        • arrScott | June 11, 2014 at 6:05 pm |

          I know, but somehow the particular context seems to transform it into a Cowboys star for me.

  • Dan J | June 11, 2014 at 3:09 pm |

    I really, really wanted to vote for Gordon Blau’s “Blish” logo. That was, for me personally, the best of the bunch. Loved the color scheme, money inspired numbers, the “angry eye”, and pretentious Nike color names. Pure genious Mr. Blau!

    • BrianC | June 11, 2014 at 3:50 pm |

      True, especially the “angry eye” (someone should produce that as a cap), but to me it violates one of the Ten Commandments of uniform deign, that is: Nicknames or abbreviations have no place on either the front or back of uniforms. No Bolts, D-Backs and definitely no player nicknames.

    • Gordon Blau | June 11, 2014 at 8:37 pm |

      Thanks, gentlemen!

  • Poisso3 | June 11, 2014 at 3:52 pm |

    Yeah, and it looks like only the Astros were forced to use their BP cap logo.

  • Poisso3 | June 11, 2014 at 3:54 pm |

    Ok, that was weird…double commented as a quote and as an individual comment…I hate IE…

  • Scott Bennett | June 11, 2014 at 8:42 pm |

    Hockey items:

    Crests ont eh sweater make no difference whatsoever – weight, “flexibility” whatever – you don’t notice the difference between a blank short and a crested shirt.

    A “warning track line? That’s what the dasher is for. It gives TV audiences the necessary contrast, but it works for players too.

    SB