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Andre Ethier for President!

photo.jpg

Notice anything missing from Andre Ethier’s uniform? Looks like he did some very selective surgery to his undershirt collar, much like a doctor removing a malignant tumor. Outstanding work.

I think we’re gonna have to name this de-swooshification in Ethier’s honor. What shall we call it — Nothing Could Be Ethier? My Winner with Andre? I’m sure you can come up with something better than those, and there’s a free Uni Watch membership waiting for the reader who submits the best name. Meanwhile, let’s hope more big leaguers follow Ethier’s example. (Thanks to Parker Ferguson for the screen shot.)

New ESPN column today, and I think you’ll find it really interesting — look here

Uni Watch News Ticker: Today is Jackie Robinson Day, but there’s been remarkably little chatter about it this season — a big change from the past three years, when we were all talking about which players (or entire teams) would be wearing No. 42. Anyway, everyone will be 42ing. … In addition, the Braves and Padres will be wearing 1984 throwbacks today. Details at the bottom of this page (with thanks to Joel Mendelson). … Regarding the Orioles wearing BP jerseys on Tuesday night, a source with the team checks in with this update: “We did it because it was T-Shirt Tuesday and we gave fans orange Matt Wieters T-shirts. Fan reaction was VERY positive (96% to 4% in surveys), so the plan is to continue the idea on our future T-Shirt Tuesdays. Of course, it would make much more sense if we wore an actual orange alternate jersey instead of the MLB-templated BPs, but that’s another discussion.” … Several very well-conceived logos on display here (with thanks to Brinke Guthrie). … Nebraska broke out their northwestern-striped stirrups the other day (as noted approvingly by Dave Feit). … The Salem Red Sox will be wearing tuxedo jerseys this Saturday. … ESPN’s recent piece on Allen Iverson mentioned one of the high schools from his hometown, Hampton High, whose teams were called the Crabbers. Rick Friedel got good screen shots of Hampton’s Indiana-style striped basketball warm-up pants and their amazing football helmets. … A kid who’s worn a Pistons jesey to school every day for four years is finally going to wear something else (with thanks to Brett Crane). … Hey, DIYers, who wants to make a jersey out of gum wrappers? That’s what an Iowa teen-ager used to make her prom dress (with thanks to Brett Crane). … Check out this photo from Oregon’s recent football practice. What’s that hardware on top of the QB’s helmet? Turns out it’s for mounting a video camera. Further evidence beginning at the 1:10 mark of this video clip (good find by BJ Lanier). … The Blue Jays wore their primary cap on Monday night — except for Alex Gonzalez, who wore the alternate “T” cap for the first few innings of the game before switching (as spotted by Timothy Chiu). … The West Virginia football team will wear a memorial helmet decal for the Upper Big Branch miners. … As usual, Rob Ullman is marking the start of the Stanley Cup playoffs by doing pin-up illos for the Eastern and Western Conference match-ups. … A Detroit Tigers blogger has come up with something truly brilliant: a chart of the team’s lower-leg stylings. Genius (big thanks to Keith Friedman). … Good coverage of CC Sabathia’s footwear. … “Panic is a small software company that’s obsessed with design,” writes Ruan Cousineau. “As an art project, they once made fake boxes for their commercial software that were made up like original Atari 2600 boxes. Anyway, a friend of theirs coaches at PS 208 in NYC. He sent out a plea for some financial help for his elementary-school basketball team. Panic agreed to help under one condition: They got to design the uniforms.” … Yesterday’s Ticker noted that the new field surface at the Rogers Centre has “AstroTurf” printed on the field in foul territory. And here’s why. Key quote: “AstroTurf will pay MLB a royalty for each field it sells to baseball programs at the professional, college, high school and recreational level, said MLB Properties Senior VP/Licensing Howard Smith. Those fees range from $4,000-16,000 depending on the product, said AstroTurf Dir of Sales Troy Squires. Each surface will display MLB’s logo and the AstroTurf brand.” I’m sure you know what I think of all this (hint: rhymes with “douchebaggery”). … New home kit supposedly in the works for Chelsea (with thanks to Bryan Justman). … Speaking of soccer, Peter Ripberger stumbled upon a site that has posted proposed Arsenal kit designs all the way through 2026. “Granted, he’s assuming that Emirates Airlines will still be the shirt sponsor, but that’s a very minor detail,” says Peter. … Wojciech Gluszak found a new site devoted to A’s memorabilia. Lots of good stuff here, including this poster (note the differing stirrup treatments) and this amazing patch. … Jake Doyle just got back from a trip to the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, where he made the following uni-notable observation: “There was a display featuring childhood drawings made by Jimi Hendrix, including some drawings of sports scenes. There were several drawings of football players in crayon with the words ‘Exact Colors!’ written on them.” Kinda puts “Purple Haze” in a whole new light, no? … I’ve said it before and I’ll keep on saying it: I love the undersleeve striping on those 1940s Cubs uniforms (thanks, Phil). … Also from Phil: “Who are these guys? The 60th Infantry Regiment Go-Devils of the 9th Infantry Division in the spring of 1946, that’s who.” … If you watch this video clip, you can see the 1990 Dolphins wearing the Joe Robbie memorial armband (as spotted by Andy McKillop). … DIY note from Marty Hick, who writes: “I can’t stand the black underbills on MLB caps. So I found some fitted caps for five dollars each, and the underbills match the bill tops. I sewed on my own patches, and now I have an array of hats suited for me. Three of them are military patches, one is derived from a movie/TV show, and the other is my Mammals merit badge (I am a big fan of squirrels). I think the colors work well on each of the hats, and I truly enjoy sporting something that no one else has.” … Brandon Marshall may need a new uni number (with thanks to Alan Borock). … Kinda digging this old Blackhawks warm-up suit (good find by Jeff Barak). … “My eight-year-old son asked me this year if he could wear stirrups,” writes Dan Winter. “Don’t where he came up with the idea but I sure am proud. He wasn’t happy however when he found out he had to wear purple and his team was the Huskies. He hates them both!” … Serious apostrophe catastrophe in St. Louis, where they made the same mistake 10 times on one sign — ugh (as reported by Nick Werner).

 

183 comments to Andre Ethier for President!

  • traxel | April 15, 2010 at 8:42 am |

    Like the hats Marty Hick. Getting ready to do the same DIY thing. And why do people go to great lengths to keep squirrels out of their bird feeders? They are so much more entertaining to watch than birds!

  • NickW | April 15, 2010 at 8:51 am |

    Woo hoo. First time ever in the ticker :)

    The worst part about catching the apostrophe problem was that not a single other person I was with could figure out what about the sign got me fired up (aside from the 10 championships). I will be sending the Cardinals a strongly worded email today.

    For Ethier’s removal, I propose the word deCRAPitation.

  • bill | April 15, 2010 at 8:52 am |

    It an Eitherasure.

    Eitherase – To remove annoying logo creep by snipping.

  • bill | April 15, 2010 at 8:56 am |

    If I paid closer attention to the guy’s name… it’s Ethierase

  • dwight | April 15, 2010 at 8:58 am |

    SOCKS! Now that I have your attention, here is a link to an article in the Houston Chronicle that I figured many of you would appreciate. In the article are a few links to places to get them:

    http://blogs.chron.c...

  • LI Phil | April 15, 2010 at 8:59 am |

    easy on…ethier off

  • WarDamnEagle | April 15, 2010 at 9:05 am |

    I can’t believe the Braves are going to bring these back.

    http://cache1.asset-...

    There was such a negative stigma attached to those jerseys b/c they stunk for most of the 1980s while wearing them. I guess enough time has passed that the team is willing to bring them back for a throwback game. Vey similar to Ricko’s hatred of the powder-blue Twins unis with red hats. Bad memories of bad teams.

    http://i.cdn.turner....

  • Eriq Jaffe | April 15, 2010 at 9:07 am |

    Into the Ethier

  • Jeremy | April 15, 2010 at 9:09 am |

    “In addition, the Braves and Padres will be wearing 1984 throwbacks today.”

    Maybe, they’ll get into a throwback brawl like 1984 as well http://www.youtube.c...

  • The Jeff | April 15, 2010 at 9:12 am |

    [quote comment=”385688″]I can’t believe the Braves are going to bring these back.

    http://cache1.asset-...

    There was such a negative stigma attached to those jerseys b/c they stunk for most of the 1980s while wearing them. I guess enough time has passed that the team is willing to bring them back for a throwback game. Vey similar to Ricko’s hatred of the powder-blue Twins unis with red hats. Bad memories of bad teams.

    http://i.cdn.turner....

    Throwbacks don’t need to be to uniforms of GOOD teams, they just have to look cool and/or different. See NFL, Denver – 1960 or Tampa Bay – 1976.

  • billy v | April 15, 2010 at 9:13 am |

    I kind of liked

    eithernized

  • WarDamnEagle | April 15, 2010 at 9:14 am |

    [quote comment=”385690″]”In addition, the Braves and Padres will be wearing 1984 throwbacks today.”

    Maybe, they’ll get into a throwback brawl like 1984 as well http://www.youtube.c...

    True story, I was at this game. I was 9, and it was first Braves game. My parents drove my brother and I to Atlanta for the weekend. The weather sucked. There was a huge rain delay before that game. It was emblematic of those Braves teams. But I got a plastic batting helmet out of it, so I was happy.

  • dwight | April 15, 2010 at 9:17 am |

    Andre the Giant (pain in Nike’s ass)

  • MG12 | April 15, 2010 at 9:17 am |

    He is “Huffing the Ethier”.

    Do you like the not-so-subtle drug reference?

  • LI Phil | April 15, 2010 at 9:22 am |

    [quote comment=”385688″]I can’t believe the Braves are going to bring these back.

    http://cache1.asset-...

    There was such a negative stigma attached to those jerseys b/c they stunk for most of the 1980s while wearing them. I guess enough time has passed that the team is willing to bring them back for a throwback game. Vey similar to Ricko’s hatred of the powder-blue Twins unis with red hats. Bad memories of bad teams.

    http://i.cdn.turner....

    it’s funny how “personal” we take the uniforms…bad teams could have great unis, but if the team stinks, then the fan of that team associates the uni with losing…and thus has a lower opinion of the uni

    otoh, a good team can wear a really shitty uni and because a team is successful in it, the uniform is accorded more love than it would otherwise

    witness the 86 mets…imho, other than the black travesty they currently sport, that was my least favorite uniform, but because they won a world series in it, it remains a fan favorite…but it was garishly ugly (again, my opinion)

    i should have more on this subject this weekend…

  • floormaster squeeze | April 15, 2010 at 9:24 am |

    I like Ethier getting credit but I like “Victory Chop!” better.

  • Jeremy | April 15, 2010 at 9:26 am |

    new Chelsea kits now officially relaeased http://www.chelseafc...,,10268,00.html

    more close-up pictures here http://www.footballs...

  • JimWa | April 15, 2010 at 9:30 am |

    Ethier Me Or The Logo – but something’s got to give

    (though, honestly, my vote so far goes to Ethierase)

  • JimWa | April 15, 2010 at 9:33 am |

    [quote comment=”385696″][quote comment=”385688″]I can’t believe the Braves are going to bring these back.

    http://cache1.asset-...

    There was such a negative stigma attached to those jerseys b/c they stunk for most of the 1980s while wearing them. I guess enough time has passed that the team is willing to bring them back for a throwback game. Vey similar to Ricko’s hatred of the powder-blue Twins unis with red hats. Bad memories of bad teams.

    http://i.cdn.turner....

    it’s funny how “personal” we take the uniforms…bad teams could have great unis, but if the team stinks, then the fan of that team associates the uni with losing…and thus has a lower opinion of the uni

    otoh, a good team can wear a really shitty uni and because a team is successful in it, the uniform is accorded more love than it would otherwise

    witness the 86 mets…imho, other than the black travesty they currently sport, that was my least favorite uniform, but because they won a world series in it, it remains a fan favorite…but it was garishly ugly (again, my opinion)

    i should have more on this subject this weekend…[/quote]

    A pullover with a belt? No doubt there are many other examples, but I thought all ’80s pullovers were worn with drawstring pants.

  • scott | April 15, 2010 at 9:50 am |

    [quote comment=”385700″]A pullover with a belt? No doubt there are many other examples, but I thought all ’80s pullovers were worn with drawstring pants.[/quote]

    Then you have the opposite case, where the Orioles wore button-down jerseys, but elastic pants.

  • pru | April 15, 2010 at 9:51 am |

    Ethier numbs Nike.

    Play on ether as an anesthetic.

  • Paul Lukas | April 15, 2010 at 9:52 am |

    Today’s ESPN column is up:
    http://sports.espn.g...

  • Keith B | April 15, 2010 at 9:52 am |

    [quote comment=”385685″]If I paid closer attention to the guy’s name… it’s Ethierase[/quote]

    Was going to make a suggestion, but this one has my vote.

    “He Ethierased the Nike logo from his neckline.” Sounds like that what it is.

  • random reader | April 15, 2010 at 9:53 am |

    If I’m not mistaken, Andre Ethier has an endorsement deal with Easton (can someone double check if he still does?). If so, that should explain why the swoosh was removed from his undershirt.

  • Ry Co 40 | April 15, 2010 at 9:55 am |

    [quote comment=”385696″][quote comment=”385688″]I can’t believe the Braves are going to bring these back.

    http://cache1.asset-...

    There was such a negative stigma attached to those jerseys b/c they stunk for most of the 1980s while wearing them. I guess enough time has passed that the team is willing to bring them back for a throwback game. Vey similar to Ricko’s hatred of the powder-blue Twins unis with red hats. Bad memories of bad teams.

    http://i.cdn.turner....

    it’s funny how “personal” we take the uniforms…bad teams could have great unis, but if the team stinks, then the fan of that team associates the uni with losing…and thus has a lower opinion of the uni

    otoh, a good team can wear a really shitty uni and because a team is successful in it, the uniform is accorded more love than it would otherwise

    witness the 86 mets…imho, other than the black travesty they currently sport, that was my least favorite uniform, but because they won a world series in it, it remains a fan favorite…but it was garishly ugly (again, my opinion)

    i should have more on this subject this weekend…[/quote]

    perfect example for me is the current unis of the penguins. REALLY crappy jersey, with the forearm gold, and the weird side gold. nothing makes sence. plus it’s a template they share with the senators. add to it the dumb pants stripe. eff’ing lame if you ask me! but, we won a championship in it, so it’s loved in pittsburgh. you’ll never catch me wearing that style jersey…

    f.y.i.,

    i like NickW’s “deCRAPitation”

  • Ricko | April 15, 2010 at 10:02 am |

    [quote comment=”385691″][quote comment=”385688″]I can’t believe the Braves are going to bring these back.

    http://cache1.asset-...

    There was such a negative stigma attached to those jerseys b/c they stunk for most of the 1980s while wearing them. I guess enough time has passed that the team is willing to bring them back for a throwback game. Vey similar to Ricko’s hatred of the powder-blue Twins unis with red hats. Bad memories of bad teams.

    http://i.cdn.turner....

    Throwbacks don’t need to be to uniforms of GOOD teams, they just have to look cool and/or different. See NFL, Denver – 1960 or Tampa Bay – 1976.[/quote]

    Zackly. The idea is to get a look at ’em, warts and all. Sometimes butt-ugly is what it’s all about (add Canadiens’ barber pole and Eagles’ powder and light gold to The Jeff’s list of examples). Nothing wrong with eliciting a “My god, they used to wear THAT???”

    Anyone really think someone in Montreal picked the stripeys because there were just some damn good lookin’? Seriously?

    Now, if we were talking about wearing some team deciding to wear them REGULARLY, that would be whole different thing. Twins wanna wear the powder blues and red-crown hats once a a throwback, no prob. Revering them as something to brought back permanently? No frickin’ way.

    —Ricko

  • inkracer | April 15, 2010 at 10:04 am |

    The only thing I can come up with doesn’t really give credit to Ethier for being the 1st one to (noticeably) do this…

    Logo-No-Go.

  • chance michaels | April 15, 2010 at 10:06 am |

    [quote comment=”385703″]Today’s ESPN column is up:
    http://sports.espn.g...
    Outstanding stuff. I wish teams would put that much thought into the players’ uniform design these days, much less the design for all the supporting staff.

    And the more I see of those Astro uniforms, the more I want them back. They’re simple enough to work with a modern aesthetic, but actually reflect the team’s nickname.

  • Geeman | April 15, 2010 at 10:06 am |

    [quote comment=”385696″][quote comment=”385688″]I can’t believe the Braves are going to bring these back.

    http://cache1.asset-...

    There was such a negative stigma attached to those jerseys b/c they stunk for most of the 1980s while wearing them. I guess enough time has passed that the team is willing to bring them back for a throwback game. Vey similar to Ricko’s hatred of the powder-blue Twins unis with red hats. Bad memories of bad teams.

    http://i.cdn.turner....

    it’s funny how “personal” we take the uniforms…bad teams could have great unis, but if the team stinks, then the fan of that team associates the uni with losing…and thus has a lower opinion of the uni

    otoh, a good team can wear a really shitty uni and because a team is successful in it, the uniform is accorded more love than it would otherwise

    witness the 86 mets…imho, other than the black travesty they currently sport, that was my least favorite uniform, but because they won a world series in it, it remains a fan favorite…but it was garishly ugly (again, my opinion)

    i should have more on this subject this weekend…[/quote]

    Those ’86 unis were fine except for the piping down the side. A modern belted, button-down version would look better than the snow whites and black unis they have now.

    As for the Braves, they were good in 1982 and 1983, winning the division in 1982. T think they were nice unis.

  • Geeman | April 15, 2010 at 10:07 am |

    [quote comment=”385701″][quote comment=”385700″]A pullover with a belt? No doubt there are many other examples, but I thought all ’80s pullovers were worn with drawstring pants.[/quote]

    Then you have the opposite case, where the Orioles wore button-down jerseys, but elastic pants.[/quote]

    But the orange jersey was a pullover.

  • Geeman | April 15, 2010 at 10:09 am |

    Blue (royal or navy) and orange is such a good combination. Why don’t more teams take advantage of it?

  • mtjaws | April 15, 2010 at 10:12 am |

    NFL shop is selling Brandon Marshall jerseys today. But the picture is still #0 and it says they won’t ship until an official number is picked.

    http://www.nflshop.c...

  • Andy11 | April 15, 2010 at 10:12 am |

    “Cut the Crap”
    …because that’s what he did.

  • FormerDirtDart | April 15, 2010 at 10:16 am |

    [quote comment=”385710″][quote comment=”385696″][quote comment=”385688″]I can’t believe the Braves are going to bring these back.

    http://cache1.asset-...

    There was such a negative stigma attached to those jerseys b/c they stunk for most of the 1980s while wearing them. I guess enough time has passed that the team is willing to bring them back for a throwback game. Vey similar to Ricko’s hatred of the powder-blue Twins unis with red hats. Bad memories of bad teams.

    http://i.cdn.turner....

    it’s funny how “personal” we take the uniforms…bad teams could have great unis, but if the team stinks, then the fan of that team associates the uni with losing…and thus has a lower opinion of the uni

    otoh, a good team can wear a really shitty uni and because a team is successful in it, the uniform is accorded more love than it would otherwise

    witness the 86 mets…imho, other than the black travesty they currently sport, that was my least favorite uniform, but because they won a world series in it, it remains a fan favorite…but it was garishly ugly (again, my opinion)

    i should have more on this subject this weekend…[/quote]

    Those ’86 unis were fine except for the piping down the side. A modern belted, button-down version would look better than the snow whites and black unis they have now.

    As for the Braves, they were good in 1982 and 1983, winning the division in 1982. T think they were nice unis.[/quote]
    The Mets did wear button down versions of the “racing stripe” unis in ’91 & ’92
    http://exhibits.base...

  • Schmeltzer | April 15, 2010 at 10:22 am |

    Not uni related, but I tried curling for the first time in my life last night thanks to the inspiration from Paul’s articles and a discussion with Teebz at the last Uni-watch gathering. I’ll be in the spring league and hopefully more leagues in the fall and winter. I’ll make sure to let you know if I procure any great sweaters.

  • LI Phil | April 15, 2010 at 10:26 am |

    [quote comment=”385710″]

    Those ’86 unis were fine except for the piping down the side..[/quote]

    exactly

  • marc | April 15, 2010 at 10:28 am |

    [quote comment=”385687″]easy on…ethier off[/quote]

    BOOOO!!!!

    ;-)

  • Broadway Connie | April 15, 2010 at 10:33 am |

    “… Several very well-conceived logos on display here (with thanks to Brinke Guthrie). …”

    ***

    Excellent.

  • Frank | April 15, 2010 at 10:34 am |

    Interesting article about the Astros on the ESPN site. I don’t think you can find any wider contrast in imagery and identity than you find between the Colt .45’s and the Astros. They went from Wild West gunslingers to futuristic spacemen!
    I think a problem the Astros face today, aesthetically, is that with their ballpark they’re trying to go with a retro look but it simply doesn’t work with a team named the ‘Astros’. Their uniforms recently had a picture of the Space Shuttle on them, while the park they played in has a little steam-engine choo-choo train running across the outfield. The pieces simply don’t fit. That, combined with their god-awful red-brick jerseys, and it’s difficult to watch an Astros game on TV.

  • Kevin Z. | April 15, 2010 at 10:39 am |

    Check out the unis in this 1996 international hockey clip between USA and Canada. I didn’t remember Team USA wearing red pants and check out the gigantic swooshes. Team Canada has the maple leaf cutout design on the rear of the jersey.

    http://www.youtube.c...

  • Marti | April 15, 2010 at 10:43 am |

    [quote comment=”385682″]Like the hats Marty Hick. Getting ready to do the same DIY thing. And why do people go to great lengths to keep squirrels out of their bird feeders? They are so much more entertaining to watch than birds![/quote]
    Did you buy your hats at the hat store by Vintage Vinyl in the Loop? Can’t beat 5 bucks.

  • Miles | April 15, 2010 at 10:43 am |

    I call it looking ragged in a cut Dri-Fit

  • Ricko | April 15, 2010 at 10:43 am |

    [quote comment=”385720″]Interesting article about the Astros on the ESPN site. I don’t think you can find any wider contrast in imagery and identity than you find between the Colt .45’s and the Astros. They went from Wild West gunslingers to futuristic spacemen!
    I think a problem the Astros face today, aesthetically, is that with their ballpark they’re trying to go with a retro look but it simply doesn’t work with a team named the ‘Astros’. Their uniforms recently had a picture of the Space Shuttle on them, while the park they played in has a little steam-engine choo-choo train running across the outfield. The pieces simply don’t fit. That, combined with their god-awful red-brick jerseys, and it’s difficult to watch an Astros game on TV.[/quote]

    Current quality of play ain’t helping, either.

  • Jeff S. | April 15, 2010 at 10:44 am |

    [quote comment=”385705″]If I’m not mistaken, Andre Ethier has an endorsement deal with Easton (can someone double check if he still does?). If so, that should explain why the swoosh was removed from his undershirt.[/quote]

    You mean like this: http://www.hobbyhowt...

    Yeah, let’s not give Ethier the credit here. I’m sure this is just another in the long history of athletes hiding/removing a logo so as not to piss of his corporate sponsor.

    Although, wouldn’t it have been easier for him to just wear an Easton undershirt? Or is Nike the *exclusive* provider of MLB underwear these days?

  • interlockingtc | April 15, 2010 at 10:44 am |

    I think it was just coincidence that the Nike logo was elininated. I think Andre clipped out that portion of the collar for throat comfort. ;)

    The Hampton Crabbers helmet is exceptional! Anyone have a clearer picture?

  • mtjaws | April 15, 2010 at 10:50 am |

    My Ethier names (already submitted so you can’t steal them!):

    Truth in Ethiertizing
    Ethiering with Scissors
    Ethier Done Than Said
    Ethier’s Adage
    Ethier’s Swoosh Adage
    Ethier at the Cut
    Ethier’s Cold Cuts
    Safe T Scissors

  • Ricko | April 15, 2010 at 10:56 am |

    [quote comment=”385710″][quote comment=”385696″][quote comment=”385688″]I can’t believe the Braves are going to bring these back.

    http://cache1.asset-...

    There was such a negative stigma attached to those jerseys b/c they stunk for most of the 1980s while wearing them. I guess enough time has passed that the team is willing to bring them back for a throwback game. Vey similar to Ricko’s hatred of the powder-blue Twins unis with red hats. Bad memories of bad teams.

    http://i.cdn.turner....

    it’s funny how “personal” we take the uniforms…bad teams could have great unis, but if the team stinks, then the fan of that team associates the uni with losing…and thus has a lower opinion of the uni

    otoh, a good team can wear a really shitty uni and because a team is successful in it, the uniform is accorded more love than it would otherwise

    witness the 86 mets…imho, other than the black travesty they currently sport, that was my least favorite uniform, but because they won a world series in it, it remains a fan favorite…but it was garishly ugly (again, my opinion)

    i should have more on this subject this weekend…[/quote]

    Those ’86 unis were fine except for the piping down the side. A modern belted, button-down version would look better than the snow whites and black unis they have now.

    As for the Braves, they were good in 1982 and 1983, winning the division in 1982. T think they were nice unis.[/quote]

    If you line up all the Braves unis in the CVE (Common Visual Era since TV) those unis there in Atlanta for a few years, though kinda good looking, are still a bit like the years the Braves ran away from home.

    Sartorially speaking.

    Something else that strikes me every once in a while. Because of Hank Aaron and Eddie Matthews and Warren Spahn, I suppose, and because of two straight World Series appearance for sure, the Milwaukee Braves hold a pretty high position in baseball history.

    Yet for all that, they called Milwaukee home for just 13 seasons.

    Have been in Atlanta for 45.

    —Ricko

  • marc | April 15, 2010 at 11:01 am |

    [quote comment=”385720″]Interesting article about the Astros on the ESPN site. I don’t think you can find any wider contrast in imagery and identity than you find between the Colt .45’s and the Astros. They went from Wild West gunslingers to futuristic spacemen!
    I think a problem the Astros face today, aesthetically, is that with their ballpark they’re trying to go with a retro look but it simply doesn’t work with a team named the ‘Astros’. Their uniforms recently had a picture of the Space Shuttle on them, while the park they played in has a little steam-engine choo-choo train running across the outfield. The pieces simply don’t fit. That, combined with their god-awful red-brick jerseys, and it’s difficult to watch an Astros game on TV.[/quote]

    once they left the dome, it all went to hell. it’s like two guys, on their way to a meeting with the architects and designers, were carrying boxes of houston professional baseball history — one colt .45’s, the other astros — and they collided, thereby commingling the separate histories. the whole thing’s a dang train-wreck (pun intended)

  • pk | April 15, 2010 at 11:03 am |

    RE: Frank[quote comment=”385724″][quote comment=”385720″]Interesting article about the Astros on the ESPN site. I don’t think you can find any wider contrast in imagery and identity than you find between the Colt .45’s and the Astros. They went from Wild West gunslingers to futuristic spacemen!
    I think a problem the Astros face today, aesthetically, is that with their ballpark they’re trying to go with a retro look but it simply doesn’t work with a team named the ‘Astros’. Their uniforms recently had a picture of the Space Shuttle on them, while the park they played in has a little steam-engine choo-choo train running across the outfield. The pieces simply don’t fit. That, combined with their god-awful red-brick jerseys, and it’s difficult to watch an Astros game on TV.[/quote]

    I feel the same way about the Steelers playing in a ketchup bottle.

  • marc | April 15, 2010 at 11:05 am |

    [quote comment=”385728″]the Milwaukee Braves hold a pretty high position in baseball history.

    Yet for all that, they called Milwaukee home for just 13 seasons.

    —Ricko[/quote]

    can anyone hip me as to why the milwaukee braves had such a short tenure? change in ownership? low attendance? desire by mlb to expand southward?

  • Ricko | April 15, 2010 at 11:07 am |

    [quote comment=”385732″][quote comment=”385728″]the Milwaukee Braves hold a pretty high position in baseball history.

    Yet for all that, they called Milwaukee home for just 13 seasons.

    —Ricko[/quote]

    can anyone hip me as to why the milwaukee braves had such a short tenure? change in ownership? low attendance? desire by mlb to expand southward?[/quote]

    Calling Chance Micheals…
    Calling Chance Micheals…

  • Bernard | April 15, 2010 at 11:11 am |

    [quote comment=”385720″]Interesting article about the Astros on the ESPN site. I don’t think you can find any wider contrast in imagery and identity than you find between the Colt .45’s and the Astros. They went from Wild West gunslingers to futuristic spacemen!
    I think a problem the Astros face today, aesthetically, is that with their ballpark they’re trying to go with a retro look but it simply doesn’t work with a team named the ‘Astros’. Their uniforms recently had a picture of the Space Shuttle on them, while the park they played in has a little steam-engine choo-choo train running across the outfield. The pieces simply don’t fit. That, combined with their god-awful red-brick jerseys, and it’s difficult to watch an Astros game on TV.[/quote]

    Man, that’s a great point Frank. Something I’d never really thought about before, but that is a pretty big disconnect.

  • concealed78 | April 15, 2010 at 11:12 am |

    Re: A’s memorabilia site. There’s the old MLB logo on the 1974 World Series ticket. I thought that was phased out in 1969? I’m finding it on tickets as late as 1976. Anyone? Ricko?

  • Ricko | April 15, 2010 at 11:16 am |

    [quote comment=”385730″][quote comment=”385720″]Interesting article about the Astros on the ESPN site. I don’t think you can find any wider contrast in imagery and identity than you find between the Colt .45’s and the Astros. They went from Wild West gunslingers to futuristic spacemen!
    I think a problem the Astros face today, aesthetically, is that with their ballpark they’re trying to go with a retro look but it simply doesn’t work with a team named the ‘Astros’. Their uniforms recently had a picture of the Space Shuttle on them, while the park they played in has a little steam-engine choo-choo train running across the outfield. The pieces simply don’t fit. That, combined with their god-awful red-brick jerseys, and it’s difficult to watch an Astros game on TV.[/quote]

    once they left the dome, it all went to hell. it’s like two guys, on their way to a meeting with the architects and designers, were carrying boxes of houston professional baseball history — one colt .45’s, the other astros — and they collided, thereby commingling the separate histories. the whole thing’s a dang train-wreck (pun intended)[/quote]

    The Astros, unfortunately, got stuck with a nickname that was, from a marketing standpoint, risky. It sprung from a current (at the time) cultural phenomenon: fascination with space and the space race. The country was still loving itself for rising to the challenge JFK had issued to put a man on the moon “by the end of decade”.

    Wiser heads should have thought, “That has the potential to get dated; to lose it’s clout.”

    I mean, come on, as it stands now, probably as many people think of the Jetsons’ dog as think of space exploration when they hear “Astro.”

    Kinda like the Raptors falling over themselves to grab onto the Jurassic Park phenomenon. Oh, like THAT was gonna last forever.

    You may hate “Thunder.” But thunder ain’t goin’ anywhere.

    —Ricko

  • JimWa | April 15, 2010 at 11:16 am |

    Ethier way is fine by me

  • Richard Stover | April 15, 2010 at 11:23 am |

    [quote comment=”385696″][quote comment=”385688″]I can’t believe the Braves are going to bring these back.

    http://cache1.asset-...

    There was such a negative stigma attached to those jerseys b/c they stunk for most of the 1980s while wearing them. I guess enough time has passed that the team is willing to bring them back for a throwback game. Vey similar to Ricko’s hatred of the powder-blue Twins unis with red hats. Bad memories of bad teams.

    http://i.cdn.turner....

    it’s funny how “personal” we take the uniforms…bad teams could have great unis, but if the team stinks, then the fan of that team associates the uni with losing…and thus has a lower opinion of the uni

    otoh, a good team can wear a really shitty uni and because a team is successful in it, the uniform is accorded more love than it would otherwise

    witness the 86 mets…imho, other than the black travesty they currently sport, that was my least favorite uniform, but because they won a world series in it, it remains a fan favorite…but it was garishly ugly (again, my opinion)

    i should have more on this subject this weekend…[/quote]

    LI Phil – I respectfully disagree. Those of us old enough to appreciate the Boston/New England Patriots’ “Pat Patriot” logo and red jerseys, still much prefer it over the three or four blue so-called “Elvis” successor uni schemes. We all know, the Patriots only enjoyed a few very brief periods of success with the original uni schemes, compared to the, do I dare say, “dynasty” with the current versions.

    Those Chargers, Bills and maybe Tampa Bucs fans, with some institutional memory, I’m guessing, may agree with me on this one as well.

    The Angels, Astros and A’s had little success in their ’60s unis – but compared to what they wear today – even the yellow A’s unis, IMO, were things of beauty. What I enjoy collecting comes from the losing Red Sox teams of the mid-sixties – and yes, 1967.

    My theory is that, generally, whatever image we grew up with, is the one we like the most. We opened up our baseball cards (which were better then, too!) and analyzed every detail of the unis. Any dichotomy in a turn-back-the-clock uni is instantly recognized.

    Even with corporate logos – if you are in your fifties, which logo do you prefer to see: Esso or Exxon? Bell or Verizon? 60’s Pepsi or today’s Pepsi logo?

    Much of what we like is simply a function of age. It’s “personal”, because for many of us, we liked those “old” days of being 10, 12, 15 years old. For some very fortunate readers, their “old” days were only ten years ago.

  • Ricko | April 15, 2010 at 11:23 am |

    Oh, meant to add to Astros point…

    I remember at the time thinking “Stars” would have been a better choice. Nice dual reference to space and the Lone Star state.

    And a team named “Stars” certainly wouldn’t have been out of place playing in the “Astrodome.”

    —Ricko

  • JimWa | April 15, 2010 at 11:23 am |

    When was the last time YOUR team had a player wear 42 every day?

    http://www.flipflopf...

  • PJ Harris | April 15, 2010 at 11:23 am |

    Why is the Carndinals sign an apostrophe catastrophe? Apostrophes are used to indicate the omission of numbers such as: “The class of 1965 = the class of ’65.” or “World War II ended in 1945 = World War II ended in ’45.” Am I missing something?

  • Ricko | April 15, 2010 at 11:25 am |

    [quote comment=”385740″]When was the last time YOUR team had a player wear 42 every day?

    http://www.flipflopf...

    Micheal Jackson with Twins.
    Yeah, remember him.
    Oddball.
    Wore a glove on only one hand.
    Stange dude.

  • Rob Ullman | April 15, 2010 at 11:28 am |

    [quote comment=”385706″]
    perfect example for me is the current unis of the penguins. REALLY crappy jersey, with the forearm gold, and the weird side gold. nothing makes sence. plus it’s a template they share with the senators. add to it the dumb pants stripe. eff’ing lame if you ask me! but, we won a championship in it, so it’s loved in pittsburgh. you’ll never catch me wearing that style jersey…

    f.y.i.,

    i like NickW’s “deCRAPitation”[/quote]

    I remember when the news Pens unis debuted, I was kinda lukewarm on ’em…especially considering how much I liked the ones they’d worn previously. The triangles at the hem, even the pigeon on the shoulders…seemed like a fitting combination of all the team’s history. Still, I guess for all the reasons you mention, I have grown to like the current ones…at least I think I have! Success if funny that way, I guess!

  • marc | April 15, 2010 at 11:31 am |

    [quote comment=”385736″]The Astros, unfortunately, got stuck with a nickname that was, from a marketing standpoint, risky. It sprung from a current (at the time) cultural phenomenon: fascination with space and the space race. The country was still loving itself for rising to the challenge JFK had issued to put a man on the moon “by the end of decade”.

    Wiser heads should have thought, “That has the potential to get dated; to lose it’s clout.”

    —Ricko[/quote]

    True. I doubt many young fans outside of Houston even understand the meaning behind “Astros.” Then again, I doubt many fans of any age group are quite sure what a “Knickerbocker” is.

  • inkracer | April 15, 2010 at 11:31 am |

    [quote comment=”385740″]When was the last time YOUR team had a player wear 42 every day?

    http://www.flipflopf...

    Since Mariano Rivera joined the Yankees…

  • marc | April 15, 2010 at 11:34 am |

    [quote comment=”385739″]…a team named “Stars” certainly wouldn’t have been out of place playing in the “Astrodome.”

    —Ricko[/quote]

    unless they’re these guys

  • scott | April 15, 2010 at 11:35 am |

    [quote comment=”385744″]True. I doubt many young fans outside of Houston even understand the meaning behind “Astros.” Then again, I doubt many fans of any age group are quite sure what a “Knickerbocker” is.[/quote]

    What the hell is a Trolley Dodger, anyway?

  • chance michaels | April 15, 2010 at 11:35 am |

    [quote comment=”385733″][quote comment=”385732″][quote comment=”385728″]the Milwaukee Braves hold a pretty high position in baseball history.

    Yet for all that, they called Milwaukee home for just 13 seasons.

    —Ricko[/quote]

    can anyone hip me as to why the milwaukee braves had such a short tenure? change in ownership? low attendance? desire by mlb to expand southward?[/quote]

    Calling Chance Micheals…
    Calling Chance Micheals…[/quote]
    Yellllo?

    I would have been here sooner, but it’s “a before e.” ;)

    The Braves left for Atlanta in 1965 because Fred Miller, president of Miller Brewing, died in a plane crash in 1954.

    No, I’m serious. Jolly Cholly Grimm said so in his autobiography.

    Even after Lou Pirini moved the Braves to Milwaukee, he kept Boston as his home. He was seen in later years as distant and ineffective, especially when the team started to struggle after 1960. Pirini sold the team to a group of Chicago investors in 1962, and instantly rumors started about moving the Braves to Atlanta (or, alternately, San Diego).

    Atlanta was seen as the hot prospect because they could claim the entire South as a television market.

    Those relocation rumors hurt attendance (Milwaukee having set record after record not long before that), which would ultimately be given as the reason for moving. Then the city fathers sued, delaying the move and resulting in a lame-duck season with flat-out lousy attendance. I used to know a guy who went to the Braves’ last game at County Stadium – in his den he had the twenty-three foul balls he “caught” that day, largely because he didn’t have much competition scampering across the empty sections for them.

    So basically, the Braves moved because their Chicago-based owners saw a larger profit in being the only game in a growing Southern region than one among many in the upper Midwest. That’s it in a nutshell.

    Which brings us back to Jolly Cholly. He firmly believed that had Pirini sold to a Milwaukee owner, someone who was part of the community instead of another out-of-town investor only interested in the short-term profit statement, the Braves would have continued to thrive in the Cream City to this day.

  • LI Phil | April 15, 2010 at 11:36 am |

    [quote comment=”385732″][quote comment=”385728″]the Milwaukee Braves hold a pretty high position in baseball history.

    Yet for all that, they called Milwaukee home for just 13 seasons.

    —Ricko[/quote]

    can anyone hip me as to why the milwaukee braves had such a short tenure? change in ownership? low attendance? desire by mlb to expand southward?[/quote]

    blame lou perini, who bought the team when they were still in boston…and moved them to milwaukee, but grew tired of owning the team, and wanted to make a quick buck — perini sold the braves to a chicago-based group led by william bartholomay in 1962…since the perini and braves themselves were a transplant, he had no attachment to milwaukee, and made absolutely no conditions upon new ownership to keep the team in the cream city

    with television becoming popular in the early 60’s the new ownership group almost immediately started shopping the braves to a larger television market

    at around this same time atlanta mayor ivan allen built a brand new ballpark in less than one year, atlanta stadium, which was officially opened in 1965 in hopes of luring an existing major league baseball and/or NFL/AFL team.

    first atlanta tried to lure the kc a’s (who would move to oakland in 1968), but they were unsuccessful…however, the braves announced their intention to move to Atlanta for the 1965 season…however, an injunction filed in sconie (who did NOT want to lose the braves) kept the team there for one final season…but the injunction couldn’t keep the braves in milwaukee, and in 1966, the braves completed the move to hotlanta

    chance might be able to give a better rationale, but that’s pretty much the be all and end all

    /on another note, i read a book YEARS ago by george will (might have been “men at work”) which gives excellent descriptions of the movement of baseball teams in the 1950’s…lots of teams moved — but mostly the teams from ‘two team cities’; but you had braves to milwaukee, browns to baltimore, a’s kansas city, dodgers to la, giants to sf…

  • JimWa | April 15, 2010 at 11:36 am |

    [quote comment=”385742″][quote comment=”385740″]When was the last time YOUR team had a player wear 42 every day?

    http://www.flipflopf...

    Micheal Jackson with Twins.
    Yeah, remember him.
    Oddball.
    Wore a glove on only one hand.
    Stange dude.[/quote]

    A baseball player only wearing a glove on one hand? Bizarre indeed.

  • marc | April 15, 2010 at 11:37 am |

    [quote comment=”385741″]Why is the Carndinals sign an apostrophe catastrophe? Apostrophes are used to indicate the omission of numbers such as: “The class of 1965 = the class of ’65.” or “World War II ended in 1945 = World War II ended in ’45.” Am I missing something?[/quote]

    Look here. In the example at right, note which way the apostrophe curves, then compare to the Cards’ sign.

  • chance michaels | April 15, 2010 at 11:42 am |

    [quote comment=”385741″]Why is the Carndinals sign an apostrophe catastrophe? Apostrophes are used to indicate the omission of numbers such as: “The class of 1965 = the class of ’65.” or “World War II ended in 1945 = World War II ended in ’45.” Am I missing something?[/quote]
    The problem isn’t with using apostrophes to indicate removed text, but the fact that the apostrophes on that sign are not apostrophes.

    It’s a niggling little thing that drives many of us, Paul included, batshit.

  • Steve | April 15, 2010 at 11:44 am |

    Has anyone else ever noticed that the Numeral 7 on the penguins tv numbers is different than the 7 on the back of the jersey? havent noticed it with any of the other numbers besides 7..
    compare tv numbers: http://theoraclesays...
    http://3.bp.blogspot...

    to back of jersey: http://www.oddjack.c...

  • Michael R | April 15, 2010 at 11:45 am |

    What on Earth is going on with the sleeves on Chelsea’s jersey for next year?

    This past year’s jersey annoyed me because it had that ridiculous zipper thing and I just couldn’t buy a shirt like that and then I noticed this year’s and I was equally disgusted.

    It’s like something Rafael Nadal might wear with his pants.

  • Paul Lukas | April 15, 2010 at 11:53 am |

    [quote comment=”385741″]Why is the Carndinals sign an apostrophe catastrophe? Apostrophes are used to indicate the omission of numbers such as: “The class of 1965 = the class of ’65.” or “World War II ended in 1945 = World War II ended in ’45.” Am I missing something?[/quote]

    Sigh.

    Look here:
    http://farm4.static....

  • mmwatkin | April 15, 2010 at 11:53 am |

    [quote comment=”385703″]Today’s ESPN column is up:
    http://sports.espn.g...

    Paul,

    When you propose an ESPN piece, what kind of feedback do you get from your editor? It seems that today’s entry is more of a traditional uniwatchblog entry compared the to the usual rundown of uniform changes in a league (which is a good thing). The only reason I ask is I remember the Cowboys article that received less-than-stellar comments from angry Cowboys fans. I didn’t know if ESPN is letting you venture further into the uniwatching world on the world wide leader.

  • chance michaels | April 15, 2010 at 11:58 am |

    [quote comment=”385753″]Has anyone else ever noticed that the Numeral 7 on the penguins tv numbers is different than the 7 on the back of the jersey? havent noticed it with any of the other numbers besides 7..
    compare tv numbers: http://theoraclesays...
    http://3.bp.blogspot...

    to back of jersey: http://www.oddjack.c...
    That’s more common than most people realize – the Packers do that with certain numbers.

    Check out Mark Tauscher’s two different fives.

  • Ricko | April 15, 2010 at 12:00 pm |

    [quote comment=”385746″][quote comment=”385739″]…a team named “Stars” certainly wouldn’t have been out of place playing in the “Astrodome.”

    —Ricko[/quote]

    unless they’re these guys[/quote]

    Ah, see, there’s the beauty of choosing “Stars” in ’65…
    Hollywood Stars were long gone.
    Minnesota North Stars did not yet exist.
    Neither did L.A./Utah Stars.

    Other than, I suppose, concern over sounding presumptuous, there really wasn’t much working against “Stars” at the time.

    Seems to me the uni ended up with a star on cap, home jersey, road jersey (Texas flag patch on sleeve) and stirrups, anyway.

    As to Knickerbockers, that’s a bit different. Named after a historical figure. Not taken from a time the club was smackdab in the middle of…which can be risky because in a few years you may be real sorry you called your team the “Discos”.

    —Ricko

  • DJ | April 15, 2010 at 12:07 pm |

    What the hell is a Trolley Dodger, anyway?

    A resident of Brooklyn, who would have to dodge many a streetcar (or trolley) while going about his or her business.

  • pflava | April 15, 2010 at 12:09 pm |

    [quote comment=”385736″][quote comment=”385730″][quote comment=”385720″]Interesting article about the Astros on the ESPN site. I don’t think you can find any wider contrast in imagery and identity than you find between the Colt .45’s and the Astros. They went from Wild West gunslingers to futuristic spacemen!
    I think a problem the Astros face today, aesthetically, is that with their ballpark they’re trying to go with a retro look but it simply doesn’t work with a team named the ‘Astros’. Their uniforms recently had a picture of the Space Shuttle on them, while the park they played in has a little steam-engine choo-choo train running across the outfield. The pieces simply don’t fit. That, combined with their god-awful red-brick jerseys, and it’s difficult to watch an Astros game on TV.[/quote]

    once they left the dome, it all went to hell. it’s like two guys, on their way to a meeting with the architects and designers, were carrying boxes of houston professional baseball history — one colt .45’s, the other astros — and they collided, thereby commingling the separate histories. the whole thing’s a dang train-wreck (pun intended)[/quote]

    The Astros, unfortunately, got stuck with a nickname that was, from a marketing standpoint, risky. It sprung from a current (at the time) cultural phenomenon: fascination with space and the space race. The country was still loving itself for rising to the challenge JFK had issued to put a man on the moon “by the end of decade”.

    Wiser heads should have thought, “That has the potential to get dated; to lose it’s clout.”

    I mean, come on, as it stands now, probably as many people think of the Jetsons’ dog as think of space exploration when they hear “Astro.”

    Kinda like the Raptors falling over themselves to grab onto the Jurassic Park phenomenon. Oh, like THAT was gonna last forever.

    You may hate “Thunder.” But thunder ain’t goin’ anywhere.

    —Ricko[/quote]

    Agreed about the Astros identity crisis. Drayton McLane is a doofus.

    As a nickname, Astros has been associated with the baseball team for so long that, to me, it’s kind of like the Dodgers – the first thing you think of when you hear it is baseball. That said, they should lose the choo choo (Please no history lessons – we all know why there’s a fucking train there!) and go back to the shooting star uniforms/original team colors that define them perfectly.

  • marc | April 15, 2010 at 12:16 pm |

    [quote comment=”385758″]As to Knickerbockers, that’s a bit different. Named after a historical figure. Not taken from a time the club was smackdab in the middle of… which can be risky because in a few years you may be real sorry you called your team the “Discos”.

    —Ricko[/quote]

    Good point. Similarly though, couldn’t one make the case that, unlike the Raptors, the Astros were named not only for a popular cultural event, but an historical event as well?

  • DenverGregg | April 15, 2010 at 12:18 pm |

    As to Mr. Ethier’s escapades:

    Holy Shirt! (after the mods it looks to me like a roman collar);

    Swooshectomy;

    Cool base of the neck.

  • WarDamnEagle | April 15, 2010 at 12:19 pm |

    I see those 80s Braves unis as the end of a longer wilderness period where the team got away from it uni heritage. THE Braves uni started in 1946
    http://exhibits.base...
    and continued until 1962.

    At first the change was subtle: removing the tomahawk from ’63 to ’67.
    http://exhibits.base...

    Then they introduced home pins and a road gray that had no tomahawk and no sleeve or placket piping.
    http://exhibits.base...

    Then they went berzerk in the 1970s with the abstract sleeve feather design, softball road uni, lowercase “a,” and permanent white pants.
    http://exhibits.base...

    Next was an awful red pinstripe uni at home:
    http://exhibits.base...

    The 80s saw an introduction of a templated home and road v-neck pullover scheme that was devoid of character or personality.
    http://exhibits.base...

    It wasn until 1987 that the francise finall “got it” and went back to the classic Braves uni.
    http://exhibits.base...

    And, yes, the 82 an 83 teams won their division, but the rest of the 80s were a disaster. My childhood was littered with crap like Rick Mahler, Bob Horner, Zane Smith, Rafael Ramirez, Gene Garber, Terry Forster, rickety Claudell Washington, and the like.

    When the team’s fortunes turned around in 1991, an it was kind of a sign that winning and those classic unis go hand in hand. The Braves did not mess with those unis all through the 90s. It has only been in the past 5 or 6 years that alts have entered the picture.

    I bet Rays fans feel the same way about their team’s uni switch.

  • Broadway Connie | April 15, 2010 at 12:20 pm |

    [quote comment=”385747″][quote comment=”385744″]True. I doubt many young fans outside of Houston even understand the meaning behind “Astros.” Then again, I doubt many fans of any age group are quite sure what a “Knickerbocker” is.[/quote]

    What the hell is a Trolley Dodger, anyway?[/quote]

    Better write fast before Chance comes back from his coffee break.

    Origins of Knickerbocker. A bunch of witty young gentlemen of Anglo-Saxon descent in the New York of the early 19th Century used to entertain each other at a place called the Salmagundi Club. Leading light among them was one Washington Irving. He and his pals deplored the lack of a colorful folk history of New York, and so they made one up. Irving especially cared about the Dutch roots of Nieuw Amsterdam (blue-and-orange, remember?), but was frustrated by the lack of reliable historical data. From the little evidence that survived, he wrote a History of New York written by one Dietrich Knickerbocker. A funny “Dutch” name. Ditto Rip Van Winkle. All invention. Anyway, the Knickebocker name caught on as a kind of an NYC Uncle Sam-like symbol useful for editorial cartoons. This personage came to be known as “Father Knickerbocker,” usually dressed in 18th Century garb. Later, of course, he sold Knickerbocker Beer and can be seen dribbling a basketball in the early days of the Knicks.

    A trolley dodger was a guy adept at navigating his way through the congested urban streets of the early 20th Century, and Brooklyn was full of ’em.

  • JimWa | April 15, 2010 at 12:21 pm |

    [quote comment=”385763″]As to Mr. Ethier’s escapades:

    Holy Shirt! (after the mods it looks to me like a roman collar);

    Swooshectomy;

    Cool base of the neck.[/quote]

    Ethier thaid than done.

  • Ricko | April 15, 2010 at 12:27 pm |

    [quote comment=”385762″][quote comment=”385758″]As to Knickerbockers, that’s a bit different. Named after a historical figure. Not taken from a time the club was smackdab in the middle of… which can be risky because in a few years you may be real sorry you called your team the “Discos”.

    —Ricko[/quote]

    Good point. Similarly though, couldn’t one make the case that, unlike the Raptors, the Astros were named not only for a popular cultural event, but an historical event as well?[/quote]

    What historical event? Opening the first domed stadium?
    Ouch, not positive I’d wanted to hanging my identity/marketing hat on that twenty years hence.

    Plus, they were still in the throes of the cultural phenomenon, and that’s the risky part. You just can’t tell how that phenomenon will be regarded in the future.

    But something like “Knickerbocker” or “Thunder” (or “Stars”) for that matter, you can pretty much locate in the cultural scheme of things and figure they’ll stay in that general position. Overall point is that, all things considered, a generic or historic nickname generally is a far better bet than a trendy one.

    —Ricko

  • divino codino | April 15, 2010 at 12:27 pm |

    Paul, awesome column; a real joy to read. It’s amazing how much thought was put into every detail by the Astros.

    I have an affinity for the Astros, because my family would spend much of our spring break in the Cocoa Beach area of Florida in the 70s and 80s, and the Astros trained at the Cocoa Beach Stadium. I have a few very strong memories of all the Astros spring training games I saw there.

    – Blue tequila sunrise sweaters worn by the team instead of warm up jackets. Even then I was a proto Uni-Watcher.

    – Don Sutton stopping in the middle of a game to watch a rocket launch (from Cape Canaveral) as it rose behind the center field fence.

    – My first introduction to the major league lifestyle: Approaching a Joaquin Andujar to ask for an autograph – he had one woman on each arm and declined by saying “Joaquin busy now.”

    – My first introduction to the idea that major league baseball players aren’t necessarily world class athletes: Cliff Johnson coming out of the clubhouse wearing flip flops, unbelted jeans, untucked t-shirt, cigarette and open beer can in his left hand, dangling the rest of the six-pack from his right index finger, which was stuck through the open plastic loop.

  • Bob Loblaw | April 15, 2010 at 12:28 pm |

    [quote comment=”385688″]I can’t believe the Braves are going to bring these back.

    http://cache1.asset-...

    There was such a negative stigma attached to those jerseys b/c they stunk for most of the 1980s while wearing them. I guess enough time has passed that the team is willing to bring them back for a throwback game. Vey similar to Ricko’s hatred of the powder-blue Twins unis with red hats. Bad memories of bad teams.

    http://i.cdn.turner....
    That’s awesome news!!!! Made my day–can’t wait for another lost decade for the Bravos!!!!! heeheeheehee

  • ClaytonLust | April 15, 2010 at 12:29 pm |

    Dan Winters’ picture of his kids stirrups reminded me of my own first experiences with stirrups – we didn’t get them until “Minors” (11-12 y/o) in Tri-Boro LL (Butler, NJ) and I had no earthly idea what to do with them – but I knew every player I liked showed more than just the ribbon. I had no clue how to blouse, so I just pulled them high over my uni pants (kind of like Manny Ramirez did with the Indians). http://www.flickr.co...

    Gotta love those 80’s softball style unis.

  • Cort | April 15, 2010 at 12:31 pm |

    “Victory Chop!” is beyond brilliant.

    Swooshectomy, as in “Andre Ethier went under the knife today, for a quick swooshectomy. The equipment manager reports he should be back on the field in three to four seconds.”

    Andrescopy, as in, “Inspired by their teammate, several Dodgers underwent voluntary Andrescopes today.”

    Etherizing — like Martinizing, only it doesn’t take 60 minutes, and you can actually see the results.

  • Ricko | April 15, 2010 at 12:31 pm |

    [quote comment=”385765″][quote comment=”385747″][quote comment=”385744″]True. I doubt many young fans outside of Houston even understand the meaning behind “Astros.” Then again, I doubt many fans of any age group are quite sure what a “Knickerbocker” is.[/quote]

    What the hell is a Trolley Dodger, anyway?[/quote]

    Better write fast before Chance comes back from his coffee break.

    Origins of Knickerbocker. A bunch of witty young gentlemen of Anglo-Saxon descent in the New York of the early 19th Century used to entertain each other at a place called the Salmagundi Club. Leading light among them was one Washington Irving. He and his pals deplored the lack of a colorful folk history of New York, and so they made one up. Irving especially cared about the Dutch roots of Nieuw Amsterdam (blue-and-orange, remember?), but was frustrated by the lack of reliable historical data. From the little evidence that survived, he wrote a History of New York written by one Dietrich Knickerbocker. A funny “Dutch” name. Ditto Rip Van Winkle. All invention. Anyway, the Knickebocker name caught on as a kind of an NYC Uncle Sam-like symbol useful for editorial cartoons. This personage came to be known as “Father Knickerbocker,” usually dressed in 18th Century garb. Later, of course, he sold Knickerbocker Beer and can be seen dribbling a basketball in the early days of the Knicks.

    A trolley dodger was a guy adept at navigating his way through the congested urban streets of the early 20th Century, and Brooklyn was full of ’em.[/quote]

    And, by extension and based on stereotypes and public perceptions of somewhat parallel public transportation dilemmas, Dodgers could mean “Freeway Dodgers,” too, providing the rationale for deeming it an appropriate L.A. nickname.

    —Ricko

  • Bernard | April 15, 2010 at 12:32 pm |

    [quote comment=”385762″][quote comment=”385758″]As to Knickerbockers, that’s a bit different. Named after a historical figure. Not taken from a time the club was smackdab in the middle of… which can be risky because in a few years you may be real sorry you called your team the “Discos”.

    —Ricko[/quote]

    Good point. Similarly though, couldn’t one make the case that, unlike the Raptors, the Astros were named not only for a popular cultural event, but an historical event as well?[/quote]

    AND a noteworthy regional industry, which is why I think Astros totally works for Houston. It wouldn’t work in, say, Omaha, but given Houston’s heavy connection to and reputation for the space program, I think it’s wholly appropriate.

    Astros, to me, is just like Packers or Steelers.

  • Bernard | April 15, 2010 at 12:37 pm |

    Or (Houston) Oilers.

  • marc | April 15, 2010 at 12:40 pm |

    [quote comment=”385767″]What historical event? Opening the first domed stadium?
    Ouch, not positive I’d wanted to hanging my identity/marketing hat on that twenty years hence.

    —Ricko[/quote]

    LOL! Nah, that’d be like naming your team after BFBS unis. Sorry… I meant “Astros” as being an allusion to the space race.

  • marc | April 15, 2010 at 12:42 pm |

    [quote comment=”385773″]Astros, to me, is just like Packers or Steelers.[/quote]

    And the exact opposite of the Utah Jazz.

  • LI Phil | April 15, 2010 at 12:43 pm |

    [quote comment=”385767″]

    What historical event? Opening the first domed stadium?
    [/quote]

    wouldn’t that be the rogers centre? ;) (or really, the roman colosseum?)

  • Bob Loblaw | April 15, 2010 at 12:46 pm |

    [quote comment=”385765″][quote comment=”385747″][quote comment=”385744″]True. I doubt many young fans outside of Houston even understand the meaning behind “Astros.” Then again, I doubt many fans of any age group are quite sure what a “Knickerbocker” is.[/quote]

    What the hell is a Trolley Dodger, anyway?[/quote]

    Better write fast before Chance comes back from his coffee break.

    Origins of Knickerbocker. A bunch of witty young gentlemen of Anglo-Saxon descent in the New York of the early 19th Century used to entertain each other at a place called the Salmagundi Club. Leading light among them was one Washington Irving. He and his pals deplored the lack of a colorful folk history of New York, and so they made one up. Irving especially cared about the Dutch roots of Nieuw Amsterdam (blue-and-orange, remember?), but was frustrated by the lack of reliable historical data. From the little evidence that survived, he wrote a History of New York written by one Dietrich Knickerbocker. A funny “Dutch” name. Ditto Rip Van Winkle. All invention. Anyway, the Knickebocker name caught on as a kind of an NYC Uncle Sam-like symbol useful for editorial cartoons. This personage came to be known as “Father Knickerbocker,” usually dressed in 18th Century garb. Later, of course, he sold Knickerbocker Beer and can be seen dribbling a basketball in the early days of the Knicks.

    A trolley dodger was a guy adept at navigating his way through the congested urban streets of the early 20th Century, and Brooklyn was full of ’em.[/quote]
    Good stuff BC. I ‘m knocking off for the day as I believe my brain is NOW full! Thanks Connie! :)

  • marc | April 15, 2010 at 1:01 pm |

    [quote comment=”385772″]Dodgers could mean “Freeway Dodgers,” too, providing the rationale for deeming it an appropriate L.A. nickname.

    —Ricko[/quote]

    Or “Drive-by Dodgers.”

  • Ricko | April 15, 2010 at 1:04 pm |

    [quote comment=”385773″][quote comment=”385762″][quote comment=”385758″]As to Knickerbockers, that’s a bit different. Named after a historical figure. Not taken from a time the club was smackdab in the middle of… which can be risky because in a few years you may be real sorry you called your team the “Discos”.

    —Ricko[/quote]

    Good point. Similarly though, couldn’t one make the case that, unlike the Raptors, the Astros were named not only for a popular cultural event, but an historical event as well?[/quote]

    AND a noteworthy regional industry, which is why I think Astros totally works for Houston. It wouldn’t work in, say, Omaha, but given Houston’s heavy connection to and reputation for the space program, I think it’s wholly appropriate.

    Astros, to me, is just like Packers or Steelers.[/quote]

    Didn’t say was a bad nickname. Just saying if it’s lost any of its edge, here are the reasons.

    And also that any nickname derived from current pop culture or mindset (and “Astros” was) has some inherent risks.

    And the space program wasn’t–and still isn’t—so much a local Houston industry as it is the NATION’s space industry, located in Houston.

    In that sense, it’s different from Packers and Steelers.

    Again, is an okay name, but it does have just a bit of “big fins on cars” to it. There really is no denying that. Not if you were around in 1965 or before to realize it, of course. If you weren’t, then you can either argue, or accept the observations of those who were.

    —Ricko

  • Geeman | April 15, 2010 at 1:16 pm |

    [quote comment=”385764″]I see those 80s Braves unis as the end of a longer wilderness period where the team got away from it uni heritage. THE Braves uni started in 1946
    http://exhibits.base...
    and continued until 1962.

    At first the change was subtle: removing the tomahawk from ’63 to ’67.
    http://exhibits.base...

    Then they introduced home pins and a road gray that had no tomahawk and no sleeve or placket piping.
    http://exhibits.base...

    Then they went berzerk in the 1970s with the abstract sleeve feather design, softball road uni, lowercase “a,” and permanent white pants.
    http://exhibits.base...

    Next was an awful red pinstripe uni at home:
    http://exhibits.base...

    The 80s saw an introduction of a templated home and road v-neck pullover scheme that was devoid of character or personality.
    http://exhibits.base...

    It wasn until 1987 that the francise finall “got it” and went back to the classic Braves uni.
    http://exhibits.base...

    And, yes, the 82 an 83 teams won their division, but the rest of the 80s were a disaster. My childhood was littered with crap like Rick Mahler, Bob Horner, Zane Smith, Rafael Ramirez, Gene Garber, Terry Forster, rickety Claudell Washington, and the like.

    When the team’s fortunes turned around in 1991, an it was kind of a sign that winning and those classic unis go hand in hand. The Braves did not mess with those unis all through the 90s. It has only been in the past 5 or 6 years that alts have entered the picture.

    I bet Rays fans feel the same way about their team’s uni switch.[/quote]

    Nice history. I wonder if those looks (which at the time I thought were fine) were as jarring to traditionalists then as the new horns-and-stripes look of some of today’s uniforms are to us new traditionalists. All in all, there’s not a horrible uni in that bunch you showed, just more of a collection of uniforms representative of the eras.

    Remember that Bob Horner was a rookie sensation and once hit four homers in a game, and Terry Garber broke Pete Rose’s 44-game hitting streak in summer 1978.

  • JimV19 | April 15, 2010 at 1:22 pm |

    [quote comment=”385682″]And why do people go to great lengths to keep squirrels out of their bird feeders? They are so much more entertaining to watch than birds![/quote]

    They’re bullies who scare away the birds, they eat like pigs, they dig up the yard to bury stuff they’ll probably forget burying, and they bring their friends and family to take over the yard.

    Other than that, they’re kinda cute. Still wish the neighborhood red-tailed hawk would swoop in and take some of them.

    Needless to say, I’m not a Richmond fan:
    http://jonnewman12.f...

  • Micah | April 15, 2010 at 1:23 pm |

    Andre is sponsored by Easton, Nike is the official provider of MLB baselayer gear, and everyone has some awfully good ideas for a name for this logo creep cut-out. Its on par with the Big Papi blacking out the swoosh and putting “Reebok” on the other side, lol.

  • marc | April 15, 2010 at 1:25 pm |

    [quote comment=”385781″]Next was an awful red pinstripe uni at home:
    http://exhibits.base...

    Oh Lord… I’d forgotten about that. Brutal.

  • Bernard | April 15, 2010 at 1:26 pm |

    [quote comment=”385780″][quote comment=”385773″][quote comment=”385762″][quote comment=”385758″]As to Knickerbockers, that’s a bit different. Named after a historical figure. Not taken from a time the club was smackdab in the middle of… which can be risky because in a few years you may be real sorry you called your team the “Discos”.

    —Ricko[/quote]

    Good point. Similarly though, couldn’t one make the case that, unlike the Raptors, the Astros were named not only for a popular cultural event, but an historical event as well?[/quote]

    AND a noteworthy regional industry, which is why I think Astros totally works for Houston. It wouldn’t work in, say, Omaha, but given Houston’s heavy connection to and reputation for the space program, I think it’s wholly appropriate.

    Astros, to me, is just like Packers or Steelers.[/quote]

    Didn’t say was a bad nickname. Just saying if it’s lost any of its edge, here are the reasons.

    And also that any nickname derived from current pop culture or mindset (and “Astros” was) has some inherent risks.

    And the space program wasn’t–and still isn’t—so much a local Houston industry as it is the NATION’s space industry, located in Houston.

    In that sense, it’s different from Packers and Steelers.

    Again, is an okay name, but it does have just a bit of “big fins on cars” to it. There really is no denying that. Not if you were around in 1965 or before to realize it, of course. If you weren’t, then you can either argue, or accept the observations of those who were.

    —Ricko[/quote]

    Haha, jeez, Ricko, for someone who hates a young guy/old guy dynamic, you certainly like to go there, don’t you? ;)

    I guess I can give you the “NATION’s space industry, located in Houston.” I didn’t mean to imply that the space program was Houston’s alone. I think it’s tough to deny, though, that Houston is one of very few US cities (Cape Canaveral is another) with clear assocations to the program. It definitely does have a “big fins on cars” ring, and I like the reference, since they were prevalent around the same time. But I think you might be able to say the same thing about “Steelers”, since the steel industry in Pittsburgh has all but dried up. Maybe not “big fins on cars”… maybe… oh, I’m not sure what a more era-appropriate reference would be for them. I wasn’t around then, so I’ll accept the observations of those who were. ;)

    Pop culture AND an industry that, while not Houston’s alone, was certainly big there. I’m cool with that.

  • Ricko | April 15, 2010 at 1:27 pm |

    Let’s hear it for Willie Montanez!
    http://exhibits.base...

  • KT | April 15, 2010 at 1:34 pm |

    Awesome moment in last night’s Coyotes/Red Wings game, which I will YouTube when I get a chance.

    PHX goes ahead in the 3rd (on the eventual game-winning goal). Analyst Tyson Nash starts to describe the play, the camera pans the crowd and someone in the front row is wearing a Kamloops Blazers jersey.

    No exaggeration, Nash just drops a parenthetical, “Hey, look, a Blazers jersey!” and then just continues with his analysis of the goal. It was epic.

  • Bob Loblaw | April 15, 2010 at 1:34 pm |

    [quote comment=”385784″][quote comment=”385781″]Next was an awful red pinstripe uni at home:
    http://exhibits.base...

    Oh Lord… I’d forgotten about that. Brutal.[/quote]
    that’s not horrible. Consider it was 1976 and the red pins were a one off similar to the Cowboy’s red/white /blue helmet striping that year.

  • Ricko | April 15, 2010 at 1:35 pm |

    Bernard said…

    “Pop culture AND an industry that, while not Houston’s alone, was certainly big there. I’m cool with that.”

    Oh, me, too. This all started with a discussion of the convoluted and contradictory images at the stadium.

    And I was only trying to point out that something more generic like “Stars” would have eliminated much of that contradiction.

    So the REAL issue is, based on reality (not always the first consideration around here, I’ll admit), “Yeah, the train’s kinda quaint and historical and all…but maybe either it or all the other disjointed stuff there ought to go.”

    —Ricko

  • marc | April 15, 2010 at 1:39 pm |

    [quote comment=”385785″]I think you might be able to say the same thing about “Steelers”, since the steel industry in Pittsburgh has all but dried up.[/quote]

    Or the L.A. Lakers, ’cause that lake dri… ah, forget it.

  • hugh.c.mcbride | April 15, 2010 at 1:41 pm |

    Re: Jake Doyle’s visit to the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, I was there last summer & noticed the same Hendrix drawings that he reported on in today’s ticker. As I recall, they were very detailed, Ricko-esque illustrations.

    When I got back home, I did some Googling, but was unable to find any images of the Hendrix uni sketches online — and the HOF has a “no photos” policy that precludes visitors from taking their own images. Too bad, cuz as I thought at the time, the exhibit would definitely be of interest to the UW crew.

    Thanks, Paul & Jake, for a nice reminder of a great afternoon on the shores of Lake Erie :-)

  • marc | April 15, 2010 at 1:46 pm |

    [quote comment=”385788″]that’s not horrible. Consider it was 1976 and the red pins were a one off similar to the Cowboy’s red/white /blue helmet striping that year.[/quote]

    It’s funny to look back at ’76. They were slapping red, white and blue on anything that moved… or didn’t. I’m just not a big fan of red pins. Strangely, however, I love the Phils’ unis — especially those one-off WS Champs/Opening Day deals (loved the gold outline). Go figure.

  • Ry Co 40 | April 15, 2010 at 1:48 pm |

    [quote comment=”385774″]Or (Houston) Oilers.[/quote]

    washington capitals… LOL

  • JimV19 | April 15, 2010 at 1:48 pm |

    [quote comment=”385780″][quote comment=”385773″][quote comment=”385762″][quote comment=”385758″]As to Knickerbockers, that’s a bit different. Named after a historical figure. Not taken from a time the club was smackdab in the middle of… which can be risky because in a few years you may be real sorry you called your team the “Discos”.

    —Ricko[/quote]

    Good point. Similarly though, couldn’t one make the case that, unlike the Raptors, the Astros were named not only for a popular cultural event, but an historical event as well?[/quote]

    AND a noteworthy regional industry, which is why I think Astros totally works for Houston. It wouldn’t work in, say, Omaha, but given Houston’s heavy connection to and reputation for the space program, I think it’s wholly appropriate.

    Astros, to me, is just like Packers or Steelers.[/quote]

    Didn’t say was a bad nickname. Just saying if it’s lost any of its edge, here are the reasons.

    And also that any nickname derived from current pop culture or mindset (and “Astros” was) has some inherent risks.

    And the space program wasn’t–and still isn’t—so much a local Houston industry as it is the NATION’s space industry, located in Houston.

    In that sense, it’s different from Packers and Steelers.

    Again, is an okay name, but it does have just a bit of “big fins on cars” to it. There really is no denying that. Not if you were around in 1965 or before to realize it, of course. If you weren’t, then you can either argue, or accept the observations of those who were.

    —Ricko[/quote]

    Then would you consider the Oklahoma Sooners to have an outdated name?

    To me, they’re of the same mindset – one commemorates the historical expansion westward, the other commemorates the historical expansion upward.

    You could include the 49ers and 76ers as well. Wouldn’t consider those to have lost their edge. If today’s kids don’t get what any of these names stand for, that’s on the education system.

  • Cort | April 15, 2010 at 1:52 pm |

    Astros is a ridiculous name, born of the fevered mind of Judge Roy Hofheinz, one of the last larger-than-life, mad genius political leaders Texas ever produced (today it’s all beady eyes and haircuts).

    It is a name that begs to be associated with weirdness. The Dome was a weird place. A wonderful place, but so very weird. (Did you know that it had a private bowling alley? Or a German biergarten, called “Der Domeskeller”?) It needs tailfins, Ricko, and Protestant infielders in crewcuts and skinny ties, and a grounds crew dressed in faux spacegear. It needs to be serenaded by Dean Martin and early Herb Alpert and especially Juan Garcia Esquivel. And it needs to be splayed across a rainbow jersey, or at the very least the old “shooting star” togs.

    That darn billionaire Sunday School teacher has taken all of the funkiness out of the team. The new stadium, despite its amazing Union Station entrance, has all the charm of a Wal-Mart Supercenter. Craig Biggio was a great player, but he had all the charm, wit and flavor of a 55 gallon drum of Miracle Whip. Drayton built the Astros on Biggio’s personality.

    And the uniforms, all pinstriped in their brick red, sand and charcoal finery, are about as interesting to look at as tollbooth operators’ smocks.

    Houston is the weirdest city in North America, far weirder than Austin, which tries too hard. Why we refuse to embrace it, why we insist on being some bland wasteland, some greater Plano, is beyond me.

  • Bob Loblaw | April 15, 2010 at 1:59 pm |

    [quote comment=”385792″][quote comment=”385788″]that’s not horrible. Consider it was 1976 and the red pins were a one off similar to the Cowboy’s red/white /blue helmet striping that year.[/quote]

    It’s funny to look back at ’76. They were slapping red, white and blue on anything that moved… or didn’t. I’m just not a big fan of red pins. Strangely, however, I love the Phils’ unis — especially those one-off WS Champs/Opening Day deals (loved the gold outline). Go figure.[/quote]

    IIRC this logo was slapped on a many a uniform as well. http://farm4.static....

  • marc | April 15, 2010 at 2:01 pm |

    [quote comment=”385796″]IIRC this logo was slapped on a many a uniform as well.

    http://farm4.static....

    …and they kept it small too [eye-roll]

  • JimV19 | April 15, 2010 at 2:02 pm |

    [quote comment=”385796″][quote comment=”385792″][quote comment=”385788″]that’s not horrible. Consider it was 1976 and the red pins were a one off similar to the Cowboy’s red/white /blue helmet striping that year.[/quote]

    It’s funny to look back at ’76. They were slapping red, white and blue on anything that moved… or didn’t. I’m just not a big fan of red pins. Strangely, however, I love the Phils’ unis — especially those one-off WS Champs/Opening Day deals (loved the gold outline). Go figure.[/quote]

    IIRC this logo was slapped on a many a uniform as well.

    http://farm4.static....

    Yep.
    http://www.steelerso...

  • KT | April 15, 2010 at 2:03 pm |

    [quote comment=”385780″]Again, is an okay name, but it does have just a bit of “big fins on cars” to it. There really is no denying that. Not if you were around in 1965 or before to realize it, of course. If you weren’t, then you can either argue, or accept the observations of those who were.
    [/quote]

    And if anyone had any doubts that Paul’s making Ricko into a minor celebrity had gone to his head…your honor, Exhibit A.

  • LI Phil | April 15, 2010 at 2:05 pm |

    [quote comment=”385780″][quote comment=”385773″]
    Astros, to me, is just like Packers or Steelers.[/quote]

    Didn’t say was a bad nickname. Just saying if it’s lost any of its edge, here are the reasons.

    And also that any nickname derived from current pop culture or mindset (and “Astros” was) has some inherent risks.
    [/quote]

    ya know, tho…i never knew for certain (had a good hunch tho) that ‘astros’ was really short for astronaut (which i confirmed, finally with a lot of research for last weekend’s post) — yeah, i vaguely remembered the groudns crew and all the space-like stuff, but even someone who is in their mid-forties might be hard pressed to explain all that comes with “astros”…

    i’d wager MOST, if not all, non-houston fans just figure it’s some kind of made up/nonsensical name (“hey, they played on astroturf, i guess that’s how they were named”)…rather than having such a closely-knit tie-in with the space industry and such

    dated or not, the amount of disconnect today definitely relegates it to the ‘lakers/jazz/dodgers’ category…the only difference being — the astros never moved

    but the point is this…i’d wager 85 or more percent of today’s baseball fans neither know or nor particularly associate space and astronauts with the houston ballclub

  • Adam | April 15, 2010 at 2:18 pm |

    Naming Suggestion: curethier

    Reason: Combine the words “curet” and Ethier (worked out nicely – huh)

    Definition of curet
    Etymology: Fr, curette, scoop
    1 n, a surgical instrument shaped like a spoon or scoop for scraping and removing material or tissue from an organ, cavity, or surface. A curet may be blunt or sharp and is designed in a shape and size appropriate to its use.
    2 v, to remove tissue or debris with such a device

  • Schmeltzer | April 15, 2010 at 2:18 pm |

    [quote comment=”385800″][quote comment=”385780″][quote comment=”385773″]
    Astros, to me, is just like Packers or Steelers.[/quote]

    Didn’t say was a bad nickname. Just saying if it’s lost any of its edge, here are the reasons.

    And also that any nickname derived from current pop culture or mindset (and “Astros” was) has some inherent risks.
    [/quote]

    ya know, tho…i never knew for certain (had a good hunch tho) that ‘astros’ was really short for astronaut (which i confirmed, finally with a lot of research for last weekend’s post) — yeah, i vaguely remembered the groudns crew and all the space-like stuff, but even someone who is in their mid-forties might be hard pressed to explain all that comes with “astros”…

    i’d wager MOST, if not all, non-houston fans just figure it’s some kind of made up/nonsensical name (“hey, they played on astroturf, i guess that’s how they were named”)…rather than having such a closely-knit tie-in with the space industry and such

    dated or not, the amount of disconnect today definitely relegates it to the ‘lakers/jazz/dodgers’ category…the only difference being — the astros never moved

    but the point is this…i’d wager 85 or more percent of today’s baseball fans neither know or nor particularly associate space and astronauts with the houston ballclub[/quote]

    No way! 85%? You’re not giving people enough credit to figure things out on their own. I’m not from Houston, I wasn’t around when the team was created, I wasn’t even a baseball fan until last year. But come on, Astros + Star logo + “Houston, we’ve had a problem.” How could someone not know what that is a reference to. That is NOWHERE near as obscure as the dodgers or knicks.

  • marc | April 15, 2010 at 2:18 pm |

    [quote comment=”385800″]but the point is this…i’d wager 85 or more percent of today’s baseball fans neither know or nor particularly associate space and astronauts with the houston ballclub[/quote]

    And that brings it all back around to Frank’s original point of there being a HUGE disconnect with the design of the ballpark and uniforms with the history of the club. I don’t think Astros ownership missed the boat (train?) entirely since they tried to tie in Houston’s historical elements… they just used the wrong elements. They could have really played up the space-race aspect. They could have used rockets, space capsules, moon rovers, Clint Howard

  • JimV19 | April 15, 2010 at 2:20 pm |

    [quote comment=”385800″][quote comment=”385780″][quote comment=”385773″]
    Astros, to me, is just like Packers or Steelers.[/quote]

    Didn’t say was a bad nickname. Just saying if it’s lost any of its edge, here are the reasons.

    And also that any nickname derived from current pop culture or mindset (and “Astros” was) has some inherent risks.
    [/quote]

    ya know, tho…i never knew for certain (had a good hunch tho) that ‘astros’ was really short for astronaut (which i confirmed, finally with a lot of research for last weekend’s post) — yeah, i vaguely remembered the groudns crew and all the space-like stuff, but even someone who is in their mid-forties might be hard pressed to explain all that comes with “astros”…

    i’d wager MOST, if not all, non-houston fans just figure it’s some kind of made up/nonsensical name (“hey, they played on astroturf, i guess that’s how they were named”)…rather than having such a closely-knit tie-in with the space industry and such

    dated or not, the amount of disconnect today definitely relegates it to the ‘lakers/jazz/dodgers’ category…the only difference being — the astros never moved

    but the point is this…i’d wager 85 or more percent of today’s baseball fans neither know or nor particularly associate space and astronauts with the houston ballclub[/quote]

    So the words, “Uh, Houston, we’ve had a problem” mean nothing to those of us within spitting distance of age 40?

    I think more people get the Astros connection than you or Ricko think. Otherwise, why would the NFL http://upload.wikime... and the NCAA http://foxsportshous... use such “dated” imagery?

    If today’s baseball fans don’t get the connection, perhaps the Minute Maid Park train is distracting them. Again, that’s easy to fix: http://www.model-rai...

  • Schmeltzer | April 15, 2010 at 2:21 pm |

    Oh, but I should mention that I didn’t know that it came directly from “Astronaut”. I just thought it was supposed to reference space-y stuff. So to me, it doesn’t sound any stranger than a team name of “Stars”. Though if the were called the Houston Astronauts in everyday conversation, that would sound VERY outdated.

  • Ricko | April 15, 2010 at 2:26 pm |

    [quote comment=”385794″][quote comment=”385780″][quote comment=”385773″][quote comment=”385762″][quote comment=”385758″]As to Knickerbockers, that’s a bit different. Named after a historical figure. Not taken from a time the club was smackdab in the middle of… which can be risky because in a few years you may be real sorry you called your team the “Discos”.

    —Ricko[/quote]

    Good point. Similarly though, couldn’t one make the case that, unlike the Raptors, the Astros were named not only for a popular cultural event, but an historical event as well?[/quote]

    AND a noteworthy regional industry, which is why I think Astros totally works for Houston. It wouldn’t work in, say, Omaha, but given Houston’s heavy connection to and reputation for the space program, I think it’s wholly appropriate.

    Astros, to me, is just like Packers or Steelers.[/quote]

    Didn’t say was a bad nickname. Just saying if it’s lost any of its edge, here are the reasons.

    And also that any nickname derived from current pop culture or mindset (and “Astros” was) has some inherent risks.

    And the space program wasn’t–and still isn’t—so much a local Houston industry as it is the NATION’s space industry, located in Houston.

    In that sense, it’s different from Packers and Steelers.

    Again, is an okay name, but it does have just a bit of “big fins on cars” to it. There really is no denying that. Not if you were around in 1965 or before to realize it, of course. If you weren’t, then you can either argue, or accept the observations of those who were.

    —Ricko[/quote]

    Then would you consider the Oklahoma Sooners to have an outdated name?

    To me, they’re of the same mindset – one commemorates the historical expansion westward, the other commemorates the historical expansion upward.

    You could include the 49ers and 76ers as well. Wouldn’t consider those to have lost their edge. If today’s kids don’t get what any of these names stand for, that’s on the education system.[/quote]

    Absolutely NOT what I said.
    At all.

    All those were named, as I specifically defined things, AFTER the time periods/events in question, not DURING them.

    When an event or era is OVER you have a far greater ability to determine how it likely is to be regarded. Not while you’re in the midst of it.

    Would anyone in their right mind have named a team the “Yahoos” a few years back because it played in Yahoo’s home town? Wouldn’t it be painfully obvious that it might potentially have a relatively short shelf life? THAT’s what I was saying. And there is more that a little of that in the whole astro-space-futuristic-Flash Gordon comes to life- “we’re going to the moon” mindset of the mid-’60s.

    Packers, Steelers, Oilers etc., will be good even if the industry goes away, because it will always be about the town’s history. “Astros” is a kind of hip buzz word from a particular time frame (and if it’s meant to be short for “Astronauts” that’s even worse, because just going with Astronauts would have been better; at least we know what an Astronaut IS).

    A more appropriate parallel to Packers or Steelers or Oilers, in the case of Houston, would be, say, Explorers. “Astros” was just a flashy new prefix, a popular catch-all derived from astronomy and attached to all sorts of things: astronaut, astrophysics, astrobiology, etc., etc., etc.

    Again, not saying Astros is a bad name. Just that it has a few weaknesses because it has a bit of “once-upon-a-time-trendy” about it.

    —Ricko

  • Trent | April 15, 2010 at 2:31 pm |

    you forgot to mention the Utah Jazz named their court after the late Larry H. Miller. last week you mentioned they would announce that they would change jerseys let me know what happened?
    Go JAZZ!!!!

  • JimV19 | April 15, 2010 at 2:32 pm |

    I hope no one thinks 85 percent of NBA fans don’t understand why Houston’s team is the Rockets.

    Now I could see 85 percent of fans not knowing they started out as the San Diego Rockets, but I think more than 85 percent can see why it was a great idea to keep the nickname after the move.

  • marc | April 15, 2010 at 2:34 pm |

    [quote comment=”385806″]Packers, Steelers, Oilers etc., will be good even if the industry goes away, because it will always be about the town’s history. “Astros” is a kind of hip buzz word from a particular time frame (and if it’s meant to be short for “Astronauts” that’s even worse, because just going with Astronauts would have been better; at least we know what an Astronaut IS).

    —Ricko[/quote]

    Yes, but isn’t Astros a reference to Houston’s history as well? I see what you’re saying about it being a buzzword, but it carries historical as well as pop cultural significance. The Packers and Steelers were both named in the midst of their heyday if I’m not mistaken.

  • JimV19 | April 15, 2010 at 2:36 pm |

    [quote comment=”385809″][quote comment=”385806″]Packers, Steelers, Oilers etc., will be good even if the industry goes away, because it will always be about the town’s history. “Astros” is a kind of hip buzz word from a particular time frame (and if it’s meant to be short for “Astronauts” that’s even worse, because just going with Astronauts would have been better; at least we know what an Astronaut IS).

    —Ricko[/quote]

    Yes, but isn’t Astros a reference to Houston’s history as well? I see what you’re saying about it being a buzzword, but it carries historical as well as pop cultural significance. The Packers and Steelers were both named in the midst of their heyday if I’m not mistaken.[/quote]

    Agreed. I also see what Ricko is saying, but to me the name is more historical than it is cultural.

  • LI Phil | April 15, 2010 at 2:38 pm |

    “houston…we’ve had a problem”

    and how many of us ever heard that phrase before seeing the movie apollo 13?

    i was a history major and grew up just after the first moon landing (born in 1966) and can barely remember watching some of the subsequent attempts on the television as a mere lad…so i was certainly aware of the importance of houston and space

    i was also keenly aware of the astros…and the astrodome and astroturf…but i didn’t see that many games played there as a kid and even if i did…i likely didn’t see the groundskeepers in their astronaut suits during commerical breaks

    maybe it’s just me being young and not making the connection…apparently it’s obvious to some, but seriously, i really just looked upon ‘astros’ as a teams’ name…i didn’t know what a padre or a phillie (still don’t) was either, but to me they were just names…obviously as i grew older, i made the connection, but i’d still be willing to be that for many, there is no association between the houston ballclub and mission control or the space race

  • Bernard | April 15, 2010 at 2:41 pm |

    [quote comment=”385795″]Astros is a ridiculous name, born of the fevered mind of Judge Roy Hofheinz, one of the last larger-than-life, mad genius political leaders Texas ever produced (today it’s all beady eyes and haircuts).

    It is a name that begs to be associated with weirdness. The Dome was a weird place. A wonderful place, but so very weird. (Did you know that it had a private bowling alley? Or a German biergarten, called “Der Domeskeller”?) It needs tailfins, Ricko, and Protestant infielders in crewcuts and skinny ties, and a grounds crew dressed in faux spacegear. It needs to be serenaded by Dean Martin and early Herb Alpert and especially Juan Garcia Esquivel. And it needs to be splayed across a rainbow jersey, or at the very least the old “shooting star” togs.

    That darn billionaire Sunday School teacher has taken all of the funkiness out of the team. The new stadium, despite its amazing Union Station entrance, has all the charm of a Wal-Mart Supercenter. Craig Biggio was a great player, but he had all the charm, wit and flavor of a 55 gallon drum of Miracle Whip. Drayton built the Astros on Biggio’s personality.

    And the uniforms, all pinstriped in their brick red, sand and charcoal finery, are about as interesting to look at as tollbooth operators’ smocks.

    Houston is the weirdest city in North America, far weirder than Austin, which tries too hard. Why we refuse to embrace it, why we insist on being some bland wasteland, some greater Plano, is beyond me.[/quote]

    This, by the way, is an amazing post. An absolute pleasure to read!

  • Ricko | April 15, 2010 at 2:43 pm |

    [quote comment=”385799″][quote comment=”385780″]Again, is an okay name, but it does have just a bit of “big fins on cars” to it. There really is no denying that. Not if you were around in 1965 or before to realize it, of course. If you weren’t, then you can either argue, or accept the observations of those who were.
    [/quote]

    And if anyone had any doubts that Paul’s making Ricko into a minor celebrity had gone to his head…your honor, Exhibit A.[/quote]

    Have you EVER seen me comment on how trends and public moods and such were in the ’30s and ’40s?

    No. And you won’t. Because I have no frame of reference for them. I didn’t experience them.

    That doesn’t seem to be a problem for some here, though, who are perfectly willing to debate how things were living in the ’50s and ’60s….even though they weren’t born until the ’70s (or later).

    Guess there’s no value in turning to someone and saying, “You lived through it, what’s your take on it? What was it like?”

    Better to just put your own spin on it and call it accurate, right? Why waste all that time LISTENING.

    Or nitpick. Some live there. Makes ’em feel superior without contributing anything of value.

    —Ricko

  • Jeremy | April 15, 2010 at 2:50 pm |

    Houston almost had a historical nickname a few years ago- just a small problem with offending the Mexican-American community http://www.chron.com...

  • Ricko | April 15, 2010 at 2:51 pm |

    [quote comment=”385812″][quote comment=”385795″]Astros is a ridiculous name, born of the fevered mind of Judge Roy Hofheinz, one of the last larger-than-life, mad genius political leaders Texas ever produced (today it’s all beady eyes and haircuts).

    It is a name that begs to be associated with weirdness. The Dome was a weird place. A wonderful place, but so very weird. (Did you know that it had a private bowling alley? Or a German biergarten, called “Der Domeskeller”?) It needs tailfins, Ricko, and Protestant infielders in crewcuts and skinny ties, and a grounds crew dressed in faux spacegear. It needs to be serenaded by Dean Martin and early Herb Alpert and especially Juan Garcia Esquivel. And it needs to be splayed across a rainbow jersey, or at the very least the old “shooting star” togs.

    That darn billionaire Sunday School teacher has taken all of the funkiness out of the team. The new stadium, despite its amazing Union Station entrance, has all the charm of a Wal-Mart Supercenter. Craig Biggio was a great player, but he had all the charm, wit and flavor of a 55 gallon drum of Miracle Whip. Drayton built the Astros on Biggio’s personality.

    And the uniforms, all pinstriped in their brick red, sand and charcoal finery, are about as interesting to look at as tollbooth operators’ smocks.

    Houston is the weirdest city in North America, far weirder than Austin, which tries too hard. Why we refuse to embrace it, why we insist on being some bland wasteland, some greater Plano, is beyond me.[/quote]

    This, by the way, is an amazing post. An absolute pleasure to read![/quote]

    Agreed. A pleasure to read. Fun.
    And not just because it beautifully makes my point,
    but because that there is some good writin’.

    –Ricko

  • Steve | April 15, 2010 at 3:03 pm |

    the NCAA is finally banning eye black that has messages on it:

    http://sports.espn.g...

  • marc | April 15, 2010 at 3:14 pm |

    [quote comment=”385806″]”Astros” was just a flashy new prefix, a popular catch-all derived from astronomy and attached to all sorts of things: astronaut, astrophysics, astrobiology, etc., etc., etc.

    —Ricko[/quote]

    Was “Astros” really used that way by regular folks? That’s hilarious… and pretty dang corny too which, I take it, is the basis for your whole argument — cool then + cornball now = moniker without long legs.

    I like the name, I just wish the team would acknowledge it’s past a little better. A return to Tequila Sunrise might help.

  • Mike Engle | April 15, 2010 at 3:17 pm |

    I emailed my name suggestion to Paul already, but here it is again.
    “Ethier Cleavage.”
    Because to cut the Swoosh out of the neck makes a tiny bit of cleavage, and because it sounds like “ether cleavage,” a chemical reaction I don’t understand at all, but with an explanation here:
    http://en.wikipedia....

  • Ricko | April 15, 2010 at 3:38 pm |

    [quote comment=”385817″][quote comment=”385806″]”Astros” was just a flashy new prefix, a popular catch-all derived from astronomy and attached to all sorts of things: astronaut, astrophysics, astrobiology, etc., etc., etc.

    —Ricko[/quote]

    Was “Astros” really used that way by regular folks? That’s hilarious… and pretty dang corny too which, I take it, is the basis for your whole argument — cool then + cornball now = moniker without long legs.

    I like the name, I just wish the team would acknowledge it’s past a little better. A return to Tequila Sunrise might help.[/quote]

    Not so much by regular folks, but in advertising, media, etc. The AstroWorld amusement park was near the Astrodome, remember. And the AstroWorld Hotel, of course. And there IS that dog on the “The Jetsons”. And “Tom Corbett, Space Cadet”‘s best buddies were Roger and Astro. The name is a reflection of an attitude of the times, not an industry, not an occupation. And it NEVER was short for Astronaut. No, sir, owes directly to the stadium.

    And again, I never said I don’t like the name, just that if it has a weaknesses it’s that it’s sorta campy, a bit like a team called the “23 Skidoos” would be. In the future, “Astros” may have that kind of charm. Right now it’s in that limbo between hip and “delightfully harking back to another place and time”. That’s all.

    From a marketing standpoint, the team possibly might consider whether to have fun with it (as you and Cort have suggested) or to insist on continuing to try to neutralize it to the point is has NO meaning whatsoever and therefore doesn’t SEEM campy.

    —Ricko

  • Kek | April 15, 2010 at 3:40 pm |

    Wait, shouldn’t Easton be called a douchebag, or Ethier himself for cutting the swoosh out? How is this any different from MJ hiding the logo with a draped flag following the ’96 games because it wasn’t a swoosh.

    Would Ethier be applauded if it were the other way around, if he cut out an Easton logo because he was a Nike guy. Somehow I doubt it.

    Nike was criticized when Fujita, a Nike guy, covered his logo and was dropped when it was Fujita himself who was contractually wrong.

  • Ry Co 40 | April 15, 2010 at 3:44 pm |

    [quote comment=”385812″][quote comment=”385795″]Astros is a ridiculous name, born of the fevered mind of Judge Roy Hofheinz, one of the last larger-than-life, mad genius political leaders Texas ever produced (today it’s all beady eyes and haircuts).

    It is a name that begs to be associated with weirdness. The Dome was a weird place. A wonderful place, but so very weird. (Did you know that it had a private bowling alley? Or a German biergarten, called “Der Domeskeller”?) It needs tailfins, Ricko, and Protestant infielders in crewcuts and skinny ties, and a grounds crew dressed in faux spacegear. It needs to be serenaded by Dean Martin and early Herb Alpert and especially Juan Garcia Esquivel. And it needs to be splayed across a rainbow jersey, or at the very least the old “shooting star” togs.

    That darn billionaire Sunday School teacher has taken all of the funkiness out of the team. The new stadium, despite its amazing Union Station entrance, has all the charm of a Wal-Mart Supercenter. Craig Biggio was a great player, but he had all the charm, wit and flavor of a 55 gallon drum of Miracle Whip. Drayton built the Astros on Biggio’s personality.

    And the uniforms, all pinstriped in their brick red, sand and charcoal finery, are about as interesting to look at as tollbooth operators’ smocks.

    Houston is the weirdest city in North America, far weirder than Austin, which tries too hard. Why we refuse to embrace it, why we insist on being some bland wasteland, some greater Plano, is beyond me.[/quote]

    This, by the way, is an amazing post. An absolute pleasure to read![/quote]

    “would you buy furniture from a store called Unpainted Huffheins?”

    sorry… first thing that cropped up there… ignore me… carry on! lol

  • LI Phil | April 15, 2010 at 3:49 pm |

    [quote comment=”385820″]Wait, shouldn’t Easton be called a douchebag, or Ethier himself for cutting the swoosh out? How is this any different from MJ hiding the logo with a draped flag following the ’96 games because it wasn’t a swoosh.

    Would Ethier be applauded if it were the other way around, if he cut out an Easton logo because he was a Nike guy. Somehow I doubt it.

    Nike was criticized when Fujita, a Nike guy, covered his logo and was dropped when it was Fujita himself who was contractually wrong.[/quote]

    i think, in this instance, paul’s applauding any logo being removed

    might it have had less resonance if an easton logo were removed because he was a nike guy — i think you know that answer

    but tis the logo creep removal that’s in play here…and i suppose it doesn’t hurt that it was a swoosh that was the logo

  • marc | April 15, 2010 at 4:02 pm |

    [quote comment=”385821″]”would you buy furniture from a store called Unpainted Huffheins?”[/quote]

    LMAO! Not every day one comes across a “Raising Arizona” quote. OK, then.

  • marc | April 15, 2010 at 4:07 pm |

    [quote comment=”385819″]From a marketing standpoint, the team possibly might consider whether to have fun with it (as you and Cort have suggested) or to insist on continuing to try to neutralize it to the point is has NO meaning whatsoever and therefore doesn’t SEEM campy.[/quote]

    My guess is, if there’s hundreds of millions of dollars involved, they’re gonna choose the path toward neuter-dom.

  • JTH | April 15, 2010 at 4:08 pm |

    Oh, and what’s not to love about Jackie Robinson Day? Zambrano’s pitching and the cubs are actually wearing pinstripes.

    I turned the game on as he was batting and not realizing what day it was, I assumed that he was pinch-hitting until I noticed the 42 on Jeff Suppan’s back.

    Yeah, so I guess it’s time to read today’s post.

  • Bernard | April 15, 2010 at 4:10 pm |

    C’mon, Phil. You’re not going to chime in with this?

    “Incidentally, the Astros is short for “Astronauts” (although the team was never known by this name) and relates to their proximity to the Houston Space Center (since renamed the Johnson Space Center), from which the Apollo, Gemini and Mercury space flights originated.”

  • LI Phil | April 15, 2010 at 4:17 pm |

    [quote comment=”385826″]C’mon, Phil. You’re not going to chime in with this?

    “Incidentally, the Astros is short for “Astronauts” (although the team was never known by this name) and relates to their proximity to the Houston Space Center (since renamed the Johnson Space Center), from which the Apollo, Gemini and Mercury space flights originated.”[/quote]

    you should see the emails im exchanging with ricko right now

  • Bernard | April 15, 2010 at 4:25 pm |

    [quote comment=”385827″][quote comment=”385826″]C’mon, Phil. You’re not going to chime in with this?

    “Incidentally, the Astros is short for “Astronauts” (although the team was never known by this name) and relates to their proximity to the Houston Space Center (since renamed the Johnson Space Center), from which the Apollo, Gemini and Mercury space flights originated.”[/quote]

    you should see the emails im exchanging with ricko right now[/quote]

    Haha, fair enough.

  • JimV19 | April 15, 2010 at 4:48 pm |

    [quote comment=”385811″]”houston…we’ve had a problem”

    and how many of us ever heard that phrase before seeing the movie apollo 13?

    i was a history major and grew up just after the first moon landing (born in 1966) and can barely remember watching some of the subsequent attempts on the television as a mere lad…so i was certainly aware of the importance of houston and space

    i was also keenly aware of the astros…and the astrodome and astroturf…but i didn’t see that many games played there as a kid and even if i did…i likely didn’t see the groundskeepers in their astronaut suits during commerical breaks

    maybe it’s just me being young and not making the connection…apparently it’s obvious to some, but seriously, i really just looked upon ‘astros’ as a teams’ name…i didn’t know what a padre or a phillie (still don’t) was either, but to me they were just names…obviously as i grew older, i made the connection, but i’d still be willing to be that for many, there is no association between the houston ballclub and mission control or the space race[/quote]

    Born a year later than you, but even if I wasn’t such a space geek, I had the Tang commercials, http://www.youtube.c... the Fisher Space Pen ads and the nightly news to remind me that we were still in the space age even in the early to mid 70s. Anyone who even casually watched the news (like me) back then knew Mission Control was located in Houston. That’s why I instantly connected Astros and the Astrodome with astronauts.

    I’ll admit I wasn’t familiar with “Houston, we’ve had a problem” until the movie, but I knew about the mission well before that. My point in bringing that line up was: even those who only get their history from Hollywood know there’s a connection with Houston and the space program.

    I’ll agree there are SOME out there who have no clue, but I think those are the same people who ask, “What’s a Sooner? Or a 49er?” I also think they’re in the minority, like those people Jay Leno finds on the street.

  • Daniel | April 15, 2010 at 4:50 pm |

    Either’s handy work should always now be called the “anti-swoosh ‘swoosh’ collar.” After all, it swooshed over where the evil swoosh was!

  • JimV19 | April 15, 2010 at 4:52 pm |

    [quote comment=”385827″][quote comment=”385826″]C’mon, Phil. You’re not going to chime in with this?

    “Incidentally, the Astros is short for “Astronauts” (although the team was never known by this name) and relates to their proximity to the Houston Space Center (since renamed the Johnson Space Center), from which the Apollo, Gemini and Mercury space flights originated.”[/quote]

    you should see the emails im exchanging with ricko right now[/quote]

    Got something you want to share with the rest of the class? ;)

  • pflava | April 15, 2010 at 4:55 pm |

    Cort referring to the “billionaire Sunday School teacher” is right on. Perfect.

    McLane doesn’t get it. At all. He has flushed the visual identity of the team straight down the toilet in favor of something bland and lifeless. And as our friend Cort would probably agree, that isn’t representative of Houston.

    Besides, this is one of the all time great underrated baseball caps…

    http://www.dee-nee.c...

  • marc | April 15, 2010 at 5:00 pm |

    [quote comment=”385832″]Besides, this is one of the all time great underrated baseball caps…

    http://www.dee-nee.c...

    is it just me, or does terry puhl look an awful lot like this guy?

  • JimV19 | April 15, 2010 at 5:08 pm |

    [quote comment=”385819″]And there IS that dog on the “The Jetsons”. And “Tom Corbett, Space Cadet”‘s best buddies were Roger and Astro. The name is a reflection of an attitude of the times, not an industry, not an occupation. And it NEVER was short for Astronaut. No, sir, owes directly to the stadium.

    And again, I never said I don’t like the name, just that if it has a weaknesses it’s that it’s sorta campy, a bit like a team called the “23 Skidoos” would be. In the future, “Astros” may have that kind of charm. Right now it’s in that limbo between hip and “delightfully harking back to another place and time”. That’s all.[/quote]

    Now “Space Cadets,” THERE’s a campy, outdated name. Glad they didn’t use that one.

    I figured they got Astros from the Astrodome, but I also figured they got Astrodome from the connection to the space program. So yeah, I’m not disagreeing with you, just harmonizing with you.

    “…between hip and ‘delightfully harking back to another place and time’…” Sounds like a good place to be, especially from the viewpoint of someone like me who is heading more towards the latter with every passing day. :)

  • Cort | April 15, 2010 at 5:18 pm |

    There was a local journalist, several decades ago, who wrote that Houston is “a whiskey and trombone town.” I have no idea what that means, but it makes perfect sense.

    Hofheinz was an opportunist. He got his franchise by trading on the romantic notions of a bygone era: the Colt .45 players and staff were required to wear Stetsons while traveling on road trips, and the groundbreaking for the “Harris County Domed Stadium” was accomplished not by sliver plated shovels, but by a bunch of guys in business suits firing six-shooters into the dirt. He got his domed stadium by exploiting the two local mania: first, that we must, at any cost, Be Better Than Dallas; second, that this is Space City, U.S.A. (it even says so on our cops’ uniform patches).

    They were called the Astros instead of the Astronauts, because Astros fit better in a headline, and the Judge was terrified that if they performed poorly, sportswriters would shorten the nickname to the ‘Nauts (‘nauts, naughts — you get the picture).

    Everything that makes Houston Houston happened in a crazy, oil-soaked spasm between 1963 and 1984, the last year of Phi Slamma Jamma. The Astros were an important part of that. Today, in their pinstripe suits, they are just another bunch of disappointing millionaires, like R. Allen Sanford and his cronies, or the boys down the street at Enron. Drayton McLane deserves a swirly.

    OK, enough. Sorry, boys — I do get riled sometimes. Serenity NOW!

  • LI Phil | April 15, 2010 at 5:25 pm |

    [quote comment=”385831″]
    Got something you want to share with the rest of the class? ;)[/quote]

    just that we have a difference of opinion on whether or not astros was short for astronauts…if you read cort’s post, 3rd paragraph…that’s pretty much it in a nutshell…and correct

    not worth arguing over on here

  • marc | April 15, 2010 at 5:31 pm |

    [quote comment=”385835″]the Colt .45 players and staff were required to wear Stetsons while traveling on road trips[/quote]

    LOL! All i can picture is George Costanza and the whiskey-swillin’ Astros’ execs trading barbs over the phone… “You tell that son of a bitch no Yankee is ever comin’ to Houston. Not as long as you bastards are running things.”

  • marc | April 15, 2010 at 5:33 pm |

    [quote comment=”385835″]the groundbreaking for the “Harris County Domed Stadium” was accomplished not by sliver plated shovels, but by a bunch of guys in business suits firing six-shooters into the dirt.[/quote]

    F**king brilliant. Abso-f**king-lutely brilliant.

  • JTH | April 15, 2010 at 5:55 pm |

    [quote comment=”385838″][quote comment=”385835″]the groundbreaking for the “Harris County Domed Stadium” was accomplished not by sliver plated shovels, but by a bunch of guys in business suits firing six-shooters into the dirt.[/quote]

    F**king brilliant. Abso-f**king-lutely brilliant.[/quote]
    Yes, if the six-shooters in question were Colt .45s. Otherwise, not so much.

  • marc | April 15, 2010 at 5:58 pm |

    [quote comment=”385839″][quote comment=”385838″][quote comment=”385835″]the groundbreaking for the “Harris County Domed Stadium” was accomplished not by sliver plated shovels, but by a bunch of guys in business suits firing six-shooters into the dirt.[/quote]

    F**king brilliant. Abso-f**king-lutely brilliant.[/quote]
    Yes, if the six-shooters in question were Colt .45s. Otherwise, not so much.[/quote]

    …or they coulda poured out a little colt .45 for their homies then taken a sip for themselves. it works every time.

  • LarryB | April 15, 2010 at 6:46 pm |

    Saw this 1908? Pitt Panther picture with pinned numbers on a Pitt site.

    http://farm4.static....

  • LarryB | April 15, 2010 at 6:47 pm |

    http://farm5.static....

    Those are darn cool helmets

  • JIm | April 15, 2010 at 7:39 pm |

    Not a huge deal… but officially, the Twins have their home-navy alternate listed as being paired with the old “M” cap. As I guessed, they immediately opted for the TC cap with it instead.

  • Greg B. | April 15, 2010 at 7:49 pm |

    Here’s the best picture I could find of the “AstroTurf” wordmark on the field in Toronto:

    http://www.flickr.co...

    Looks like complete crap!

  • jesse | April 15, 2010 at 7:52 pm |

    [quote comment=”385840″][quote comment=”385839″][quote comment=”385838″][quote comment=”385835″]the groundbreaking for the “Harris County Domed Stadium” was accomplished not by sliver plated shovels, but by a bunch of guys in business suits firing six-shooters into the dirt.[/quote]

    F**king brilliant. Abso-f**king-lutely brilliant.[/quote]
    Yes, if the six-shooters in question were Colt .45s. Otherwise, not so much.[/quote]

    …or they coulda poured out a little colt .45 for their homies then taken a sip for themselves. it works every time.[/quote]
    fo’ shizzle

  • interlockingtc | April 15, 2010 at 7:56 pm |

    [quote comment=”385795″]Astros is a ridiculous name, born of the fevered mind of Judge Roy Hofheinz, one of the last larger-than-life, mad genius political leaders Texas ever produced (today it’s all beady eyes and haircuts).

    It is a name that begs to be associated with weirdness. The Dome was a weird place. A wonderful place, but so very weird. (Did you know that it had a private bowling alley? Or a German biergarten, called “Der Domeskeller”?) It needs tailfins, Ricko, and Protestant infielders in crewcuts and skinny ties, and a grounds crew dressed in faux spacegear. It needs to be serenaded by Dean Martin and early Herb Alpert and especially Juan Garcia Esquivel. And it needs to be splayed across a rainbow jersey, or at the very least the old “shooting star” togs.

    That darn billionaire Sunday School teacher has taken all of the funkiness out of the team. The new stadium, despite its amazing Union Station entrance, has all the charm of a Wal-Mart Supercenter. Craig Biggio was a great player, but he had all the charm, wit and flavor of a 55 gallon drum of Miracle Whip. Drayton built the Astros on Biggio’s personality.

    And the uniforms, all pinstriped in their brick red, sand and charcoal finery, are about as interesting to look at as tollbooth operators’ smocks.

    Houston is the weirdest city in North America, far weirder than Austin, which tries too hard. Why we refuse to embrace it, why we insist on being some bland wasteland, some greater Plano, is beyond me.[/quote]

    Post of the day.

  • Lwiedy | April 15, 2010 at 8:19 pm |

    With everyone wearing 42, it reminds me of that cartoon, “First base, Bugs Bunny….second base, Bugs Bunny……shortstop, Bugs Bunny…….”

  • scott | April 15, 2010 at 9:55 pm |

    Nice to see the Braves in the powder blue throwbacks – and doing it right by wearing them on the road, where they belong.

  • Patrick Williams | April 15, 2010 at 10:00 pm |

    Creep-ectomy.

  • LarryB | April 15, 2010 at 10:15 pm |

    [quote comment=”385847″]With everyone wearing 42, it reminds me of that cartoon, “First base, Bugs Bunny….second base, Bugs Bunny……shortstop, Bugs Bunny…….”[/quote]

    I loved that Bugs Bunny cartoon.

  • JimWa | April 15, 2010 at 10:27 pm |

    [quote comment=”385844″]Here’s the best picture I could find of the “AstroTurf” wordmark on the field in Toronto:

    http://www.flickr.co...

    Looks like complete crap![/quote]

    Has there ever been corporate advertizing on a MLB playing field before this? I DON’T LIKE TRIAL BALLOONS!

    (the Spiderman III bases come to mind … though if memory serves me correctly, those were 86’d before making into an actual game)

  • Dan P. | April 15, 2010 at 10:27 pm |

    Swoosh-B-Gone

  • John S. | April 15, 2010 at 10:28 pm |

    According to the Dodgers radio broadcast, the Dodgers are all “in ’47 style pants”, all with Stirrups. I don’t have video, so I’m not sure if that includes Manny as well.

  • Chris in Nashville | April 15, 2010 at 10:49 pm |

    [quote comment=”385853″]According to the Dodgers radio broadcast, the Dodgers are all “in ’47 style pants”, all with Stirrups. I don’t have video, so I’m not sure if that includes Manny as well.[/quote]

    Nope, not Manny. He’s wearing his pj’s

  • LI Phil | April 15, 2010 at 10:53 pm |

    [quote comment=”385853″]According to the Dodgers radio broadcast, the Dodgers are all “in ’47 style pants”, all with Stirrups. I don’t have video, so I’m not sure if that includes Manny as well.[/quote]

    mlb network showing a clip of the game, and the batter, casey blake, is wearing pajamas, but the runner on first (not sure, he’s wearing 42 tho) has bloused pants and rups (ok, its loney)

    manny on third base wearing HUGE ASS PAJAMAS (no rups)…also the third base coach has on pajamas as well…and the batboy

    they just cut away, so that’s all i saw

    but, so much for the team wide sportin’ of the rups

  • LI Phil | April 15, 2010 at 10:58 pm |

    and ugh…nice work by the stros today…wearing their batting practice tops…

    they still lost

  • Ricko | April 15, 2010 at 11:31 pm |

    Orlando Hudson of the Twins went highcuffed today, but was wearing hightops that were virtually all white. Looked like he was part of a women’s phys. ed class in 1910.

    —Ricko

  • Ricko | April 15, 2010 at 11:41 pm |

    btw, Twins were playing the Boston Red Sleeves.
    (couldn’t see socks on any of them, so who knows).

    —Ricko

  • Chuck | April 15, 2010 at 11:45 pm |

    [quote comment=”385853″]According to the Dodgers radio broadcast, the Dodgers are all “in ’47 style pants”, all with Stirrups. I don’t have video, so I’m not sure if that includes Manny as well.[/quote

    most of the team are wearing the pajama pants, I guess it is too much work to apply stirrups!

  • LI Phil | April 15, 2010 at 11:46 pm |

    [quote comment=”385857″]Orlando Hudson of the Twins went highcuffed today, but was wearing hightops that were virtually all white. Looked like he was part of a women’s phys. ed class in 1910.

    —Ricko[/quote]

    that may be so, but players were given special permission to wear the white shoes today, since they are going to be auctioned off for charity

    btw…here’s a link to the twins…

  • Chuck | April 15, 2010 at 11:48 pm |

    I am in the minority here, but I love the name Astros. I wish they would bring back the space shuttle patch.

  • Casey C. | April 16, 2010 at 12:51 am |

    [quote comment=”385857″]Orlando Hudson of the Twins went highcuffed today, but was wearing hightops that were virtually all white. Looked like he was part of a women’s phys. ed class in 1910.

    —Ricko[/quote]

    Actually Dodger blue-and-white, with a 42 on the heel, in honor of Robinson

  • Paul Lukas | April 16, 2010 at 1:17 am |

    [quote comment=”385822″][quote comment=”385820″]Wait, shouldn’t Easton be called a douchebag, or Ethier himself for cutting the swoosh out? How is this any different from MJ hiding the logo with a draped flag following the ’96 games because it wasn’t a swoosh.

    Would Ethier be applauded if it were the other way around, if he cut out an Easton logo because he was a Nike guy. Somehow I doubt it.

    Nike was criticized when Fujita, a Nike guy, covered his logo and was dropped when it was Fujita himself who was contractually wrong.[/quote]

    i think, in this instance, paul’s applauding any logo being removed

    might it have had less resonance if an easton logo were removed because he was a nike guy — i think you know that answer

    but tis the logo creep removal that’s in play here…and i suppose it doesn’t hurt that it was a swoosh that was the logo[/quote]

    And that’s why he’s my bench coach. Every single word of this is dead-on.

  • Clayton Lust | April 16, 2010 at 2:03 am |

    [quote comment=”385856″]and ugh…nice work by the stros today…wearing their batting practice tops…

    they still lost[/quote]

    ??? They won 5-1. Or are you making a joke about their fashion sense?

  • scott | April 16, 2010 at 6:56 am |

    [quote comment=”385856″]and ugh…nice work by the stros today…wearing their batting practice tops…

    they still lost[/quote]

    Weren’t those the Astros regular brick red “alts”? Though in the case of the Astros, that has become their de facto road uniform, with the team only wearing the grays if their opponent is wearing red tops and in the ASG.

  • Ricko | April 16, 2010 at 9:25 am |

    [quote comment=”385862″][quote comment=”385857″]Orlando Hudson of the Twins went highcuffed today, but was wearing hightops that were virtually all white. Looked like he was part of a women’s phys. ed class in 1910.

    —Ricko[/quote]

    Actually Dodger blue-and-white, with a 42 on the heel, in honor of Robinson[/quote]

    Good idea. Because, y’know, white shoes were Robinson’s trademark.
    Huh?

    Note to marketers: Please stop making shit up.

    —Ricko