A Niggling Little Thing That Drives Me Totally Batshit

zombies.jpg

Major League Baseball has a bunch of special logos it uses for spring training. It also has a special web page where those logos can be accessed (no, I can’t tell you where that page is, so don’t ask). The top of that page looks like this.

Arrgghh!! I’d like to think that most Uni Watch readers are smart and observant enough to have already spotted the punctuation error in that design, namely that the apostrophe on “Spring ’09″ is facing the wrong way. In fact, it’s not an apostrophe at all — it’s a single open-quote.

This error, which ranks pretty high on my list of life’s great annoyances, has been creeping into sports graphics with increasing frequency lately. And not just in date references — the open-quote miscast as an apostrophe also shows up in this type of statement, where its misuse is just as egregious. And there’s an iconic sports phrase whose punctuation is constantly botched.

The apostrophe catastrophe, as I like to call it, is rooted in word-processing and desktop-publishing programs, most of which use “smart quotes” (i.e., they automatically assume that if there’s a space immediately prior to the quote/apostrophe key being hit, that means you want an open-quote). It’s easy enough to override this default mode — with Macs, you type option-shift-] to get a real apostrophe, regardless of what precedes it; not sure how to do it in Windows — but most people don’t do this. I used to think it was because they were lazy, but now I think it’s because the incorrect imposition of smart quotes has led people to mistakenly think that the backwards open-quote is actually correct. So now the disease is spreading to non-digital writing as well.

The apostrophe catastrophe isn’t limited to sports, of course. It was rampant in last year’s political season, which featured incorrectly punctuated graphics for Obama, McCain, Clinton, anti-Clinton, Gravel, and Paul, among many other candidates. Many of those were created by amateur designers, but the same can’t be said for this sign, which appeared at the Republican National Convention (the mistake isn’t as obvious in that font, but it’s there). Even last year’s Halloween episode of The Simpsons was infected by this virus: The episode featured a voting-themed scene that included this and this. The net result of all this is a populace that increasingly has no idea what an apostrophe is for.

Who’s to blame for all these mistakes? The primary responsibility lies with graphic designers, since they’re the ones who set the type. But for every incorrectly formatted apostrophe, there’s someone (or maybe several someones) higher up the ladder who signed off on it. So I’m hereby asking — nay, demanding — that people THINK when they employ apostrophes. Think about what this character represents: It stands for something that’s missing, and it should look the same no matter where it appears within a word. If people can’t figure that out, we might be better off just skipping the apostrophe altogether.

Granted, the apostrophe catastrophe is not universal (at least not yet, although it’s getting there), and I wouldn’t bring it up on this site if not for its increasing prominence in the sports world. So just to bring things full circle, take a look at this Taco Bell commercial, which ran during the Super Bowl. Did you notice how it ended? Sigh.

(And yes, I realize there are also tons of examples of people who mistakenly use apostrophes for plural nouns, but that’s a much more obvious problem that has nothing to do with digital design. Let’s please not list any of those in today’s comments. Thanks.)

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The Proctor Files, Continued: Sunday’s gargantuan post prompted a note from our resident sporting goods expert, Terry Proctor:

Sunday’s columns from Phil and Rick were interesting. Regarding the numbering inconsistencies: Up until the NFL negotiated a deal to have a single manufacturer make all the teams’ uniforms, it was every team for itself. Some teams were provincial and went with local or regional manufacturers — for example, the Bears and Chicago Cardinals used Chicago’s Wilson or King-O’Shea (a Wilson subsidiary). The Green Bay Packers used Berlin, Wisc.-based Sand-Knit in the Lombardi era. The Cowboys uniforms were made by Southland Athletic of Terrell, Texas (east of Big D).

Teams like the Steelers bought their uniforms through either Wilson or Rawlings. And they didn’t buy each year. They would usually replace only a few badly worn jerseys or have the numbers changed on a particular shirt. You might have purchased the original set of jerseys from Wilson. But you then purchased the fill-ins through Rawlings, thereby ending up with a slightly different number font. No harm, no foul. Money was usually tight in those days and you did what you had to in order to get by.

Poor Terry’s probably given up on my ever running the transcript of the interview I did with him a few months back, but I hereby vow to transcribe that tape today. Really.

Raffle Reminder: I’m currently raffling off a free print from Sports Propaganda. For details, look here.

DIY Reminder: If you’ve created a DIY jersey or undertaken some similar project and would be willing to be interviewed for an ESPN article that I plan to write, please get in touch pronto. Thanks.

Uni Watch News Ticker: The Wall Street Journal is reporting that Citigroup honchos are “exploring the possibility” of backing out of their deal with the Mets. … Our NFL White at Home” page, compiled by Tim Brulia, has now been updated to include info from the 2008 season. … This seems like a good system: If your team loses the Super Bowl, your state gets free dirty movies. … The Seibu Lions have some new logos and uniforms. “They have changed their baby blue to a ‘Legend Blue,’ which is a link to the great Lions teams of the past when they were known as the Nishitetsu Lions,” writes Jeremy Brahm. “The i dotted with the apostrophe looks weird for us but works for the Japanese. Here’s a detailed look at the new uniform. The inner collar has 13 stars, representing their 13 Japan Series championships (10 for Seibu, 3 for Nishitetsu). On the right sleeve, there’s the Saitama Seibu wordmark, and the left sleeve has the new logo. Underneath the edge of the second button will be the slogan ‘I believe in Lions’ (I think this will not be visible). They actually have not made enough uniforms to wear during spring training, so they’ll wear this at home and this on the road during that time.” … Post-Super Bowl note: When Roethlisberger scored that first apparent TD (which was then overruled by an Arizona challenge), he was going to be stopped well short of goal line until one of his offensive linemen grabbed him and tackled him forward into the end zone. This is the very definition of “pushing or helping the runner,” which is a penalty. Has its own ref signal and everything, but I have never seen it called in all my years of watching football. Has anyone else? … Good view of Rob Blake’s faceguard here (with thanks to Brandon Tarpey). … Fun little story here about the father/son team that created the little clips that hold NFL facemasks in place (thanks, Vince). … Speaking of facemasks, yesterday’s Ticker included a link to this photo of a skier wearing a faceguard, which I thought was unusual. But as several readers pointed out to me, faceguards are very common in the slalom, because the skiers crash though the hinged gates. My thanks to all who helped fill me in on this. … Hunter Johnson sent along a bunch of old Alabama hoops photos. I particularly like how the stripes on the shorts and socks mimic each other here. … “A local theater troupe here in Chicago is performing a play entitled Beer,” writes Russ Chibe. “The obvious choice for the main character’s apparel would be a Brewers jersey, but he goes above and beyond the call of duty and actually sports a J.J. Hardy Cerveceros jersey. I blame you for the fact that I was half-distracted by the jersey during the entirety of the play.” … Interesting note from CJ Fleck, who writes: “Richard Nixon had the uniforms of the White House guards redesigned while he was president (He was inspired by the palace guards of many other countries). While I was in DC for the inauguration, I went through the newly redone Museum of American History and nabbed two shots of the royal outfits, which were not well-received in this bastion of democracy we call America.” … “This weekend was the 100th anniversary of LSU basketball,” writes Mark Jones. “A few hours before the LSU/Arkansas game, they staged an alumni game with former Tigers players, including Josh Maravich (son of the Pistol) who played for LSU several years ago. He wore a pair of his dad’s floppy socks from his Jazz days, with the low-cut Chucks and his dad’s No. 23 and haircut — very different from how Josh looked in his LSU playing days.” … According to Eric Reckman, Arizona State’s student section broke out into a cheer of “You wear purple!” (clap, clap, clap-clap-clap) during Saturday’s ASU/Washington game. And no, I had nothing to do with it. … Two notes from Denny Jones regarding Super Bowl merch: First, the little rivet on the underside of the Steelers’ championship caps has been logo-stamped. And second, did you notice that little brown splotch on the upper-left chest of the Steelers’ championship T-shirts? Turns out it’s a do-gooder label, because there’s no better way to save the planet than by churning out tons of useless merch. … Virginia point guard Sammy Zeglinski wears No. 13. But his jersey was ripped during Sunday’s Virginia/Duke game, so he had to switch to No. 1, with NNOB (with thanks to Chad Dotson). … Jose Palacios sent me a really cool gift: an Astros baseball card book from 1987. It features year-by-year galleries of ’Stros cards (including the franchise’s pre-Astros years). The whole thing was sponsored by Surf laundry soap, whose parent company generously provided a coupon on the last page (no expiration date — score!). I love how they included that arrow explaining that you can “Save 50¢ on Surf” with a 50¢ Surf coupon. … Good logo analysis here (with thanks to Darin Doughty). … Everything from here to the end of the Ticker is from Phil: A uni designer has been chosen for the 2010 U.S. snowboarding team. … Last item on this Q&A page addresses the issue of NFL uniform options. … A Minnesota soccer club is sending its old uniforms to Bangladesh.

 

257 comments to A Niggling Little Thing That Drives Me Totally Batshit

  • KF | February 3, 2009 at 8:29 am |

    Nice rant on apostrophe usage. Improper apostrophe use (its/it’s, etc.) drives me bananas and I never noticed the apparently common flipped usage you described until now. And now that will drive me crazy. Thanks Paul. :-)

  • Hank | February 3, 2009 at 8:36 am |

    Citigroup wants out of the Mets deal? Well, that’s one way to ditch the shoulder patch.

  • Noel Fliss | February 3, 2009 at 8:38 am |

    It’s not the fault of ALL designers… For a PC, to get the correct apostrophe, hold Alt and type 0146.

    Desktop publishing software has killed typography.

    For those who still want to know when to use an en dash versus an em dash, or how to spell café, I’d recommend Robert Bringhurst’s The Elements of Typographic Style, which I keep within reach.

  • Flip | February 3, 2009 at 8:39 am |

    I don’t condone vandalism, but bad punctuation shows how stupid people can be. These guys had the write idea, just bad execution. http://www.msnbc.msn... Nice rant, Paul.

  • SpfldNate | February 3, 2009 at 8:40 am |

    I work in Alumni Relations, and we use that apostrophe all the time. In Word, I think there’s a better way to do it, but if you type the apostrophe, then the year, then use a space, it will automatically flip the apostrophe for you.

  • Kevin | February 3, 2009 at 8:44 am |

    The Super Bowl champs shirts being made out of organic cotton was even mentioned in the “Hey Steelers fans you’re team just won the Super Bowl…” commercials after the game. I thought to myself that it was odd even to mention that let alone have a sticker on the shirt about it.
    I also pointed out that the Cardinal isn’t always facing the same way on Cardinals shirts and hats and stuff and my non uniform obsessed family agreed it was pretty stupid looking when you see it on one person each bird facing opposite directions.

  • Kek | February 3, 2009 at 8:48 am |

    That helping the running signal is similar to the sideline warning call you see more in college football.

    I know I’ve seen it called, but it’s extremely rare. For some reason, I’m remember during the Super Bowl Shuffle year for the Bears that Fridge got called for it in a regular season game because he was trying to push Sweetness forward for a first down but maybe some folks in the midwest could help me out there.

  • SuttonSmith | February 3, 2009 at 8:53 am |

    For anyone who really loves punctuation, like me, you should check out one of my favorite books:

    http://en.wikipedia....

    It’s a well written take on how punctuation came along, as well as how it all got so screwed up. I think it plays to the meticulous nature of Uni Watchers.

  • Bob | February 3, 2009 at 9:02 am |

    From the link about NFL uniform options…
    “As a general rule, though, most outdoor teams, especially those in warm-weather locales, try to wear white jerseys at home.

    Obviously, the writer doesn’t pay attention to the uniform trends. Most outdoor teams try to wear white for the early-season games. By November, though, it’s rare for a team not named the Cowboys, Redskins or Dolphins to wear white at home, even in the warm-weather locales (i.e. Jacksonville, Tampa, San Diego).

  • Robert in Dallas | February 3, 2009 at 9:03 am |

    I think that Nixon’s White House guard uniforms are quite sharp, and not too much like something that would be worn by the good folk who guard castles.

    http://i38.photobuck...

  • jon | February 3, 2009 at 9:06 am |

    slow uni news day, huh?

  • M.Princip | February 3, 2009 at 9:14 am |

    On that logo analysis, for the Asian Football Confederation, the former logo looks better suited for something in the medical field. However, that revision is wonderful!

    http://www.undercons...

  • Paul Lukas | February 3, 2009 at 9:17 am |

    [quote comment=”313140″]slow uni news day, huh?[/quote]

    Can’t think of anything useful to say, huh?

  • Adam | February 3, 2009 at 9:17 am |

    All rejoice “Bob the Angry Flower” and his quick guide to the apostrophe!

    http://www.angryflow...

  • Matt Lesser | February 3, 2009 at 9:18 am |

    I had advancing the runner called in an 8th grade football game at my school. What a load of shit.

  • LI Phil | February 3, 2009 at 9:24 am |

    [quote comment=”313144″]I had advancing the runner called in an 8th grade football game at my school. What a load of shit.[/quote]

    powers reffed your game?

  • Brian from Short Island | February 3, 2009 at 9:26 am |

    They never call advancing the runner, no matter how obvious it is.

    Like here. Skip to 3:05. Screw USC.

  • Ricko | February 3, 2009 at 9:26 am |

    A related issue, and we have this discussion at work periodically. If we’re writing about decades and dropping the first two digits, is it….
    ’50s
    50’s
    or simply, in today clipped styles, 50s?

    I know what’s technically correct, but has the usage “evolved” to an acceptable shorthand version?

    —Ricko
    (Anyone going to Denny’s for a free Grand Slam this a.m.?)

  • Ricko | February 3, 2009 at 9:30 am |

    [quote comment=”313146″]They never call advancing the runner, no matter how obvious it is.

    Like here. Skip to 3:05. Screw USC.[/quote]

    Without even looking, betcha Matt Lienart’s in that clip.

  • Ricko | February 3, 2009 at 9:35 am |

    As an addition to Terry’s comments, in 1959 the Steelers road unis were identical to the Pitt Panthers. Narrow NW stripes and those rounded arabic numerals (same as Washington Huskies and Cal Bears, too). Except, of course, that Pitt’s numbers and stripes were navy and the Steelers were black. It was as if the Steelers replaced only their road jerseys for ’59, because the ’58 roads had the same fatter, slightly more vertical numbers as the home (photos of the Steeler stuff in Sunday’s entry).

    —Ricko

  • Mike | February 3, 2009 at 9:35 am |

    [quote comment=”313130″]Nice rant on apostrophe usage. Improper apostrophe use (its/it’s, etc.) drives me bananas and I never noticed the apparently common flipped usage you described until now. And now that will drive me crazy. Thanks Paul. :-)[/quote]

    Still doesn’t bug me as much as when your/you’re is misused. I used to commute by a sign for “Your Somebody” aerobics studio. …drove me nuts.

  • Dustin | February 3, 2009 at 9:37 am |

    [quote comment=”313134″]I work in Alumni Relations, and we use that apostrophe all the time. In Word, I think there’s a better way to do it, but if you type the apostrophe, then the year, then use a space, it will automatically flip the apostrophe for you.[/quote]
    I never looked at doing that before, but it works (too bad Quark and Adobe never had that option when I used them frequently).

    On the comment about logo stamping of the rivet in the underside, I know for sure that New Era did that when they went to the polyester caps with black underbrims, but they could have done that much earlier (my hat collection is far from me right now). I’m fairly confident Reebok did that for at least this year, if not a couple of years so far.

  • Mad Dog | February 3, 2009 at 9:38 am |

    Can you point to a style guide that definitively says apostrophes must be facing a certain direction?

  • scott | February 3, 2009 at 9:39 am |

    [quote comment=”313130″]Nice rant on apostrophe usage. Improper apostrophe use (its/it’s, etc.) drives me bananas and I never noticed the apparently common flipped usage you described until now. And now that will drive me crazy. Thanks Paul. :-)[/quote]

    Looks like someone else has been ranting about this, too:

    http://www.rubbersqu...

  • Adam | February 3, 2009 at 9:40 am |

    [quote comment=”313140″]slow uni news day, huh?[/quote]

    Thought the same thing…

    on this SHITTY Field backing out…this is why you dont sell the name of a stadium, even a new one…just call the new stadium “Flight path of LaGuardia Field” and be done with it

  • Ricko | February 3, 2009 at 9:40 am |

    [quote comment=”313152″]Can you point to a style guide that definitively says apostrophes must be facing a certain direction?[/quote]

    Associated Press, for one.

  • Ricko | February 3, 2009 at 9:42 am |

    “Flight Path Field”?

    I like it.

  • Geeman | February 3, 2009 at 9:42 am |

    http://www.lsusports...

    LSU-Arkansas from Saturday.

  • scott | February 3, 2009 at 9:43 am |

    [quote comment=”313150″][quote comment=”313130″]Nice rant on apostrophe usage. Improper apostrophe use (its/it’s, etc.) drives me bananas and I never noticed the apparently common flipped usage you described until now. And now that will drive me crazy. Thanks Paul. :-)[/quote]

    Still doesn’t bug me as much as when your/you’re is misused. I used to commute by a sign for “Your Somebody” aerobics studio. …drove me nuts.[/quote]

    Exactly. You’re and your, it’s and its are not only far more annoying, but far worse, IMO. The more the single-open quote is used in incorrect ways, the more accepted and the norm it will become. I don’t think there is necessarily anything wrong with that.

  • marc | February 3, 2009 at 9:45 am |

    thanks, paul for pointing out the catastro-postrophe. now, as the first poster mentioned, i will be noticing it everywhere and it will drive me insane.

    i am a designer who takes pride in getting punctuation, spelling, etc. correct (at least i try), and i will admit many of my colleagues — and yes, occasionally myself included — could simply give a shit since usually there is not enough time to worry about how the message appears rather than how it is delivered. punctuation is a problem for the writer. thanks for pointing out the correct usage though because, in all honesty, i thought the apostrophe faced the way you have it but flipped vertically.

    i eagerly await your next column regarding the overuse/misuse of the ellipsis and how uppercase letters are quickly becoming an endangered species. oh… oops.

    (notice i did not use any apostrophes in the above statement so as to avoid being called for improper usage.)

  • Stuby | February 3, 2009 at 9:46 am |

    I have one of those Surf baseball card books for the A’s from the same year and it includes the KC years (maybe a few Philly years too, but I can’t remember).

    Also, I have a vague recollection of The Fridge throwing Walter Payton into the end zone once and getting flagged for it. Anyone else remember this?

  • marc | February 3, 2009 at 9:47 am |

    [quote comment=”313158″][quote comment=”313150″][quote comment=”313130″]Nice rant on apostrophe usage. Improper apostrophe use (its/it’s, etc.) drives me bananas and I never noticed the apparently common flipped usage you described until now. And now that will drive me crazy. Thanks Paul. :-)[/quote]

    Still doesn’t bug me as much as when your/you’re is misused. I used to commute by a sign for “Your Somebody” aerobics studio. …drove me nuts.[/quote]

    Exactly. You’re and your, it’s and its are not only far more annoying, but far worse, IMO. The more the single-open quote is used in incorrect ways, the more accepted and the norm it will become. I don’t think there is necessarily anything wrong with that.[/quote]

    [quote comment=”313150″][quote comment=”313130″]Nice rant on apostrophe usage. Improper apostrophe use (its/it’s, etc.) drives me bananas and I never noticed the apparently common flipped usage you described until now. And now that will drive me crazy. Thanks Paul. :-)[/quote]

    Still doesn’t bug me as much as when your/you’re is misused. I used to commute by a sign for “Your Somebody” aerobics studio. …drove me nuts.[/quote]

    that would always make me think “i have a somebody?”

  • Johnny O | February 3, 2009 at 9:53 am |

    [quote comment=”313146″]They never call advancing the runner, no matter how obvious it is.

    Like here. Skip to 3:05. Screw USC.[/quote]

    I agree. If this isn’t advancing the runner:

    http://images.dawgsp...

    …then I don’t know what is.

  • interlockingtc | February 3, 2009 at 9:54 am |

    That Josh Maravich tribute to his dad was real sweet.

  • Christopher | February 3, 2009 at 9:54 am |

    Personally, I just turn off smart quotes. On a PC (and I suspect Mac too), the single-quote/apostrophe two keys to the right of “L” actually doubles as both symbols.

    I never liked the curly quotes anyway in digital text. They look too odd at small font sizes. In print, yes. But not on the web.

    If you don’t add the curl, I believe that character is both a single-quote and apostrophe. Its more heavily weighted at the top.

  • Mike Engle | February 3, 2009 at 9:58 am |

    [quote comment=”313151″][quote comment=”313134″]I work in Alumni Relations, and we use that apostrophe all the time. In Word, I think there’s a better way to do it, but if you type the apostrophe, then the year, then use a space, it will automatically flip the apostrophe for you.[/quote]
    I never looked at doing that before, but it works (too bad Quark and Adobe never had that option when I used them frequently).

    On the comment about logo stamping of the rivet in the underside, I know for sure that New Era did that when they went to the polyester caps with black underbrims, but they could have done that much earlier (my hat collection is far from me right now). I’m fairly confident Reebok did that for at least this year, if not a couple of years so far.[/quote]
    No under-button logo on the two wool New Era caps I have here in my apartment. I know two’s hardly a collection, but no logos down/up there.

  • ClubMedSux | February 3, 2009 at 9:59 am |

    Speaking of the Seibu Lions, I saw them play the Orix Buffaloes back in ’05 and was shocked by the quality of merchandise available. For a society that 1.) loves baseball and 2.) loves to buy shit, I couldn’t find a hat that came CLOSE to authentic. The best I could find was a flimsy hat with an applique logo and a buckle closure in the back that looked worse than promo give-away hats. Maybe now that they’re changing unis I can score an authentic–albeit outdated–hat on the ‘net for cheap. (P.S. Your comment software automatically turns the apostrophe I typed before “net” into an open quote… not my fault!)

  • marc | February 3, 2009 at 10:00 am |

    [quote comment=”313163″]That Josh Maravich tribute to his dad was real sweet.[/quote]

    the low-cut chucks were the icing on the cake.

  • Lomion | February 3, 2009 at 10:04 am |

    I’ve heard that the “advancing the runner” foul was actually instituted when teams starting putting little puny guys in, giving them the ball, and then throwing them bodily over the line of scrimmage. Personally, I love the idea of a league where this and the “human pyramid” thing Paul reported on a few weeks ago are totally encouraged, but it would probably be dangerous as hell.

    Anyway, my point is that there could be MUCH more egregious violations of the rule than that “Bush comes to shove” Leinart TD, so it’s not that surprising that it went uncalled.

  • Duck | February 3, 2009 at 10:07 am |

    Nice topic today, Paul. I went to a series of terrible public schools growing up and we weren’t taught grammar or punctuation past like 3rd grade. Which of course made for some papers with more red than black my first semester at college, so I’ve heard a similar lecture first hand multiple times. But, when you’re already reliant on your computer for help, and it hinders you, is it really you’re fault? However, it did remind me of our 1999 Rockford Laser Quest shirts, that not only featured an open quote(which had to be pointed out to me), but it came after the 99 for Pete’s sake. We specifically went with full years from then on as not to repeat the embarrassment, that we then started noticing from them on at nearly every tournament.

  • Justin in AR | February 3, 2009 at 10:10 am |

    [quote comment=”313147″]A related issue, and we have this discussion at work periodically. If we’re writing about decades and dropping the first two digits, is it….
    ’50s
    50’s
    or simply, in today clipped styles, 50s?

    I know what’s technically correct, but has the usage “evolved” to an acceptable shorthand version?

    —Ricko
    (Anyone going to Denny’s for a free Grand Slam this a.m.?)[/quote]

    Ricko,

    According to my AP Stylebook, when you’re writing about decades, the proper way is ’50s, not 50’s or ’50’s. However, that may be fairly flexible, depending on who is doing the writing.

    Paul, great topic!

  • LI Phil | February 3, 2009 at 10:12 am |
  • Duck | February 3, 2009 at 10:13 am |

    And yet I still managed to put an improper you’re in there. Well at least I don’t plan on using that post in my campaign.

  • Paul | February 3, 2009 at 10:19 am |

    I’ve seen helping the runner called once during a college game. The ball carrier was airborne and falling on his back when a lineman caught him, stood him up.

  • Shaun | February 3, 2009 at 10:20 am |

    Has its own ref signal and everything, but I have never seen it called in all my years of watching football. Has anyone else?

    I believe this happened in a Rams game a few years back, either the season after they won the Super Bowl or the next. From what I remember, it was on a kickoff return, and the returner had just jumped over a player. He was falling down, and one of his blockers help keep him on his feet.

  • Ryan Connelly 40 | February 3, 2009 at 10:20 am |

    loved the topic today!!! i actually learned something. i think, ignorantly, i’ve always done this:

    09′

    …and now i know! thanks paul

    now, if only i can get that whole “grammar/spelling” thing down…

  • Teebz | February 3, 2009 at 10:23 am |

    [quote comment=”313170″]But, when you’re already reliant on your computer for help, and it hinders you, is it really you’re fault? [/quote]

    Absolutely 100% yes. Your computer doesn’t write the document for you. You do.

    Your computer is a tool for putting words on paper. Would you blame the pen if you were hand-writing the document?

  • RedWing in Colorado | February 3, 2009 at 10:27 am |

    I’m sure Powers can speak to this as well, but texting and IMing has killed any conventions about grammar in students. I can kill an entire pen by just correcting grammar. (and most of it is its/it’s your/you’re and their/there/they’re). Kids always get fired up because it’s “History, not English”

    To make it uni-ish, I’m working on a letter sweater for a “decades dance” at school, and am wondering if any of you who aren’t teaching right now have pictures of letter sweaters from the late ’50s that I can use as a model?

  • drwatson221b | February 3, 2009 at 10:31 am |

    [quote comment=”313164″]Personally, I just turn off smart quotes. On a PC (and I suspect Mac too), the single-quote/apostrophe two keys to the right of “L” actually doubles as both symbols.

    I never liked the curly quotes anyway in digital text. They look too odd at small font sizes. In print, yes. But not on the web.

    If you don’t add the curl, I believe that character is both a single-quote and apostrophe. Its more heavily weighted at the top.[/quote]

    Not to belabor the point, but using single or double primes, or “dumb quotes,” only makes the problem worse. Primes serve a function, and should only be used in typography as an abbreviation for feet and inches or minutes and seconds of an arc.

    I also turn smart quotes off and use the Alt-0146 (’), Alt-0147 (“), and Alt-0148 (”) codes… The limitations of early HTML and the fact that early Microsoft programmers failed to understand proper punctuation does not change the written language…

  • Stuby | February 3, 2009 at 10:31 am |

    I found this site documenting the 1985 Bears:

    http://www.webwaymon...

    An excerpt: “The game provided Walter with his ninth 1,000 yard season and one of my personal favorite memories of this ’85 team: Da Fridge trying to pick up Payton at the Bear’s goalline and trying to throw him into the end zone for the score (that was epic!!).”

    No mention of whether this was flagged, but I think it was.

  • Paul Lukas | February 3, 2009 at 10:39 am |

    [quote comment=”313158″][quote comment=”313150″][quote comment=”313130″]Nice rant on apostrophe usage. Improper apostrophe use (its/it’s, etc.) drives me bananas and I never noticed the apparently common flipped usage you described until now. And now that will drive me crazy. Thanks Paul. :-)[/quote]

    Still doesn’t bug me as much as when your/you’re is misused. I used to commute by a sign for “Your Somebody” aerobics studio. …drove me nuts.[/quote]

    Exactly. You’re and your, it’s and its are not only far more annoying, but far worse, IMO. The more the single-open quote is used in incorrect ways, the more accepted and the norm it will become. I don’t think there is necessarily anything wrong with that.[/quote]

    No. No, no, no. Just because you say black is white over and over again, that doesn’t make it white, and it doesn’t make it OK. It’s still black.

    And an apostrophe is still an apostrophe. There’s a right way to use it and a wrong way. The failure to use it properly is largely a failure to THINK. And that’s not a small problem. The end.

  • Steve | February 3, 2009 at 10:41 am |

    So if that Astros card book was sponsored by Nike or Reebok or Adidas (with their logo on the cover and a coupon in the back for $10 off your shoes), would you have been as excited to receive it?

    Just sayin’…

  • pk | February 3, 2009 at 10:43 am |

    Uni-Watch is now “grapheme-watch”

  • Paul Lukas | February 3, 2009 at 10:43 am |

    [quote comment=”313182″]So if that Astros card book was sponsored by Nike or Reebok or Adidas (with their logo on the cover and a coupon in the back for $10 off your shoes), would you have been as excited to receive it?

    Just sayin’…[/quote]

    When one of those companies does something as charmingly dinky as that baseball card book, complete with an endearingly silly coupon, I’ll be all over it. Can’t wait!

  • LI Phil | February 3, 2009 at 10:47 am |

    i’ll prolly never get to use this for any topic on UW (and rightly so)…except for today

    this is great

  • Rich | February 3, 2009 at 10:48 am |

    [quote comment=”313131″]Citigroup wants out of the Mets deal? Well, that’s one way to ditch the shoulder patch.[/quote]

    Oh please, oh please, oh PLEASE, let them back out, that patch is an embarrassment!

  • Tom | February 3, 2009 at 10:51 am |

    Another edible stadium on display. Note that “Steelers” is spelled out in black olives.

    America!

  • MPowers1634 | February 3, 2009 at 10:56 am |

    [quote comment=”313145″][quote comment=”313144″]I had advancing the runner called in an 8th grade football game at my school. What a load of shit.[/quote]

    powers reffed your game?[/quote]

    Nice, Phil…

    Anyone remember this:

    http://images.dawgsp...

  • ClubMedSux | February 3, 2009 at 10:56 am |

    @#50: No mention of whether this was flagged, but I think it was.

    According to this link, it was.

  • pk | February 3, 2009 at 10:57 am |

    Hey…since the grammar rodeo is in town…has there ever been grammatical errors on any uni’s that just drove you nuts?

  • Juan Grande | February 3, 2009 at 10:58 am |

    It looks like the British have solved the apostrophe problem. Just ditch it!

    http://www.msnbc.msn...

  • MPowers1634 | February 3, 2009 at 11:00 am |

    [quote comment=”313178″]I’m sure Powers can speak to this as well, but texting and IMing has killed any conventions about grammar in students. I can kill an entire pen by just correcting grammar. (and most of it is its/it’s your/you’re and their/there/they’re). Kids always get fired up because it’s “History, not English”

    To make it uni-ish, I’m working on a letter sweater for a “decades dance” at school, and am wondering if any of you who aren’t teaching right now have pictures of letter sweaters from the late ’50s that I can use as a model?[/quote]

    It is the bastardization of our language.

    I am often guilty of typing errors, as many of you here know, but laziness is no excuse.

    Your/You’re
    To/Too/Two

    Homonyms or Homophones…no Phil, not a pink Razr

  • Stuby | February 3, 2009 at 11:02 am |

    I’ve always found this apostrophe usage kind of curious…

    http://www.landsend....

  • Teebz | February 3, 2009 at 11:03 am |

    [quote comment=”313192″]
    It is the bastardization of our language.

    I am often guilty of typing errors, as many of you here know, but laziness is no excuse.

    Your/You’re
    To/Too/Two

    Homonyms or Homophones…no Phil, not a pink Razr[/quote]

    Just to let you all know, the next person that writes “loose” when they mean “lose” (you know, the opposite of “win”), I’m burning your house down, trashing your car, and beating up your children.

    Nothing irritates me more. They aren’t even pronounced the same.

  • Tony In Erie | February 3, 2009 at 11:05 am |

    We all know that corporate sponsorship is a needed thing in this modern sporting life.

    I hope Citi doesn’t does not back out because it’s it is better (sounding) to have the field named Citi Field than Cash4Gold.com Park.
    That’s That is apparently the only company that can afford Super Bowl ads at the last minute and probably the only who can afford naming rights right now.

    That’s That is just my opinion on it. Bad patch or no.

  • Hott Rodd | February 3, 2009 at 11:08 am |

    [quote comment=”313194″][quote comment=”313192″]
    It is the bastardization of our language.

    I am often guilty of typing errors, as many of you here know, but laziness is no excuse.

    Your/You’re
    To/Too/Two

    Homonyms or Homophones…no Phil, not a pink Razr[/quote]

    Just to let you all know, the next person that writes “loose” when they mean “lose” (you know, the opposite of “win”), I’m burning your house down, trashing your car, and beating up your children.

    Nothing irritates me more. They aren’t even pronounced the same.[/quote]

    Damn Canadian’s..

  • MPowers1634 | February 3, 2009 at 11:09 am |

    [quote comment=”313194″][quote comment=”313192″]
    It is the bastardization of our language.

    I am often guilty of typing errors, as many of you here know, but laziness is no excuse.

    Your/You’re
    To/Too/Two

    Homonyms or Homophones…no Phil, not a pink Razr[/quote]

    Just to let you all know, the next person that writes “loose” when they mean “lose” (you know, the opposite of “win”), I’m burning your house down, trashing your car, and beating up your children.

    Nothing irritates me more. They aren’t even pronounced the same.[/quote]

    Here, on UW, a frequent grammar mistake is stripping in place of striping.

    I have also picked up on an invented word that my students have begun using with alarming frequency:

    Versing.

    Jhonny: Who are you versing today?
    Yadier: We are versing you, idiot!

    Aarrrghhhh, Notice how I avoided quotation marks as to not be a hypocrite.

  • Teebz | February 3, 2009 at 11:09 am |

    [quote comment=”313196″][quote comment=”313194″][quote comment=”313192″]
    It is the bastardization of our language.

    I am often guilty of typing errors, as many of you here know, but laziness is no excuse.

    Your/You’re
    To/Too/Two

    Homonyms or Homophones…no Phil, not a pink Razr[/quote]

    Just to let you all know, the next person that writes “loose” when they mean “lose” (you know, the opposite of “win”), I’m burning your house down, trashing your car, and beating up your children.

    Nothing irritates me more. They aren’t even pronounced the same.[/quote]

    Damn Canadian’s..[/quote]

    Canadian’s what? That apostrophe indicates a possessive. ;o) LOL

  • Vasav | February 3, 2009 at 11:09 am |

    Regarding the “Assisting the Runner” penalty, I was in a game in high school where we were called for it on the goal line. It was 2003, so I can’t recall the exact game, but I do remember them taking the TD off the board and having to settle for a field goal because of “assisting the runner.” This was in a WWP South game football game from 2003.

  • Paul Lukas | February 3, 2009 at 11:10 am |

    [quote comment=”313195″]We all know that corporate sponsorship is a needed thing in this modern sporting life.[/quote]

    Um, what?

  • MPowers1634 | February 3, 2009 at 11:12 am |

    [quote comment=”313198″][quote comment=”313196″][quote comment=”313194″][quote comment=”313192″]
    It is the bastardization of our language.

    I am often guilty of typing errors, as many of you here know, but laziness is no excuse.

    Your/You’re
    To/Too/Two

    Homonyms or Homophones…no Phil, not a pink Razr[/quote]

    Just to let you all know, the next person that writes “loose” when they mean “lose” (you know, the opposite of “win”), I’m burning your house down, trashing your car, and beating up your children.

    Nothing irritates me more. They aren’t even pronounced the same.[/quote]

    Damn Canadian’s..[/quote]

    Canadian’s what? That apostrophe indicates a possessive. ;o) LOL[/quote]

    Well played, Teebz!

    And Tony in Erie, your/you’re about to have a can opened.

  • Juan Grande | February 3, 2009 at 11:12 am |

    [quote comment=”313194″][quote comment=”313192″]
    It is the bastardization of our language.

    I am often guilty of typing errors, as many of you here know, but laziness is no excuse.

    Your/You’re
    To/Too/Two

    Homonyms or Homophones…no Phil, not a pink Razr[/quote]

    Just to let you all know, the next person that writes “loose” when they mean “lose” (you know, the opposite of “win”), I’m burning your house down, trashing your car, and beating up your children.

    Nothing irritates me more. They aren’t even pronounced the same.[/quote]

    Damn right Teebz!

  • jimmywags | February 3, 2009 at 11:13 am |

    There was a aiding the runner penalty in a Chiefs game years ago… I’ll try to find it. It was very obvious, though. A lineman (Grunhard, I think) grabbed the running back by his jersey to keep him from falling. It happened in the open field. Late ’90s, I think.

  • Juan Grande | February 3, 2009 at 11:14 am |

    “Assisting the Runner” is the football version on “Traveling”. It is rarely called.

  • LI Phil | February 3, 2009 at 11:15 am |

    since the mets patch doesn’t actually say ‘citibank’ ‘citicorp’ or anything even approaching this…instead settling on this winner

    even if citicorp withdraws its (it’s?-j/k) sponsorship, what makes you think they’d even bother changing the patch (other than it’s horrid, unnecessary and stupid)? i’m sure we’d get the standard “well, we shipped all those authentics already, no sense in recalling them now” line…

    i say we all line up behind PL right now and form a (with apologies to craig carton) “million manny march” on the stadium in the la guardia flightpath and demand they remove that eyesore henceforth

    /who’s with me?

  • Hott Rodd | February 3, 2009 at 11:17 am |

    [quote comment=”313198″][quote comment=”313196″][quote comment=”313194″][quote comment=”313192″]
    It is the bastardization of our language.

    I am often guilty of typing errors, as many of you here know, but laziness is no excuse.

    Your/You’re
    To/Too/Two

    Homonyms or Homophones…no Phil, not a pink Razr[/quote]

    Just to let you all know, the next person that writes “loose” when they mean “lose” (you know, the opposite of “win”), I’m burning your house down, trashing your car, and beating up your children.

    Nothing irritates me more. They aren’t even pronounced the same.[/quote]

    Damn Canadian’s..[/quote]

    Canadian’s what? That apostrophe indicates a possessive. ;o) LOL[/quote]

    Oh the outrage! The horror!

  • Juan Grande | February 3, 2009 at 11:17 am |

    [quote comment=”313197″][quote comment=”313194″][quote comment=”313192″]
    It is the bastardization of our language.

    I am often guilty of typing errors, as many of you here know, but laziness is no excuse.

    Your/You’re
    To/Too/Two

    Homonyms or Homophones…no Phil, not a pink Razr[/quote]

    Just to let you all know, the next person that writes “loose” when they mean “lose” (you know, the opposite of “win”), I’m burning your house down, trashing your car, and beating up your children.

    Nothing irritates me more. They aren’t even pronounced the same.[/quote]

    Here, on UW, a frequent grammar mistake is stripping in place of striping.

    I have also picked up on an invented word that my students have begun using with alarming frequency:

    Versing.

    Jhonny: Who are you versing today?
    Yadier: We are versing you, idiot!

    Aarrrghhhh, Notice how I avoided quotation marks as to not be a hypocrite.[/quote]

    My favorite new word is “conversate” instead of “talk”.

  • Teebz | February 3, 2009 at 11:19 am |

    [quote comment=”313207″]
    My favorite new word is “conversate” instead of “talk”.[/quote]

    I still prefer “intercourse”…

    … meaning “discussion”. Get your minds out of my mind in the gutter!

  • Juan Grande | February 3, 2009 at 11:19 am |

    [quote comment=”313205″]since the mets patch doesn’t actually say ‘citibank’ ‘citicorp’ or anything even approaching this…instead settling on this winner

    even if citicorp withdraws its (it’s?-j/k) sponsorship, what makes you think they’d even bother changing the patch (other than it’s horrid, unnecessary and stupid)? i’m sure we’d get the standard “well, we shipped all those authentics already, no sense in recalling them now” line…

    i say we all line up behind PL right now and form a (with apologies to craig carton) “million manny march” on the stadium in the la guardia flightpath and demand they remove that eyesore henceforth

    /who’s with me?[/quote]

    Actually Phil, the Mets will keep the old, pre-patched jerseys and then sell them at double the price as a “limited edition collector’s item”.

  • Kurt | February 3, 2009 at 11:20 am |

    MLB announces ALS Awareness Campaign – players will wear patches on July 4, the 70th anniversary of Lou Gehrig’s speech…

  • C W | February 3, 2009 at 11:20 am |

    As soon as I leave the UW comments, I come across this:

    http://www.msnbc.msn...

    Timely.

  • Juan Grande | February 3, 2009 at 11:21 am |

    [quote comment=”313208″][quote comment=”313207″]
    My favorite new word is “conversate” instead of “talk”.[/quote]

    I still prefer “intercourse”…

    … meaning “discussion”. Get your minds out of my mind in the gutter![/quote]

    I still chuckle when the weatherman mentions what the forecast is in Intercourse, Pennsylvania. “It was hot and sticky in Intercourse today.”

  • Tony In Erie | February 3, 2009 at 11:22 am |

    [quote comment=”313200″][quote comment=”313195″]We all know that corporate sponsorship is a needed thing in this modern sporting life.[/quote]

    Um, what?[/quote]

    read: accepted by the brainwashed public.

    My apologies for my misremembering where I was posting. :) Call off the hounds!!!!!!

  • Juan Grande | February 3, 2009 at 11:23 am |

    [quote comment=”313210″]MLB announces ALS Awareness Campaign – players will wear patches on July 4, the 70th anniversary of Lou Gehrig’s speech…[/quote]

    When does the “commemorative patch” activity hit critical mass and move into overkill?

  • LI Phil | February 3, 2009 at 11:25 am |

    [quote comment=”313214″][quote comment=”313210″]MLB announces ALS Awareness Campaign – players will wear patches on July 4, the 70th anniversary of Lou Gehrig’s speech…[/quote]

    When does the “commemorative patch” activity hit critical mass and move into overkill?[/quote]

    1984

  • Jason | February 3, 2009 at 11:27 am |

    602 words on a freaking apostrophe.

    THIS is why you don’t pay a subscription fee for UniWatch.

    /just sayin’

  • MPowers1634 | February 3, 2009 at 11:28 am |

    [quote comment=”313207″][quote comment=”313197″][quote comment=”313194″][quote comment=”313192″]
    It is the bastardization of our language.

    I am often guilty of typing errors, as many of you here know, but laziness is no excuse.

    Your/You’re
    To/Too/Two

    Homonyms or Homophones…no Phil, not a pink Razr[/quote]

    Just to let you all know, the next person that writes “loose” when they mean “lose” (you know, the opposite of “win”), I’m burning your house down, trashing your car, and beating up your children.

    Nothing irritates me more. They aren’t even pronounced the same.[/quote]

    Here, on UW, a frequent grammar mistake is stripping in place of striping.

    I have also picked up on an invented word that my students have begun using with alarming frequency:

    Versing.

    Jhonny: Who are you versing today?
    Yadier: We are versing you, idiot!

    Aarrrghhhh, Notice how I avoided quotation marks as to not be a hypocrite.[/quote]

    My favorite new word is “conversate” instead of “talk”.[/quote]

    or perhaps, converse. Not what Josh Maravich wore.

    Today, in class, I asked the kids to compile a list of three items that they would like to have if stranded on a desserted(deserted, JK) island and explain why.

    Of course, I get answers like: cell phones, laptops and playstations but one explanation as to why someone needed water tickled and upset me.

    The student wanted to stay inhydrated as the inverse to dehydrated.

  • Kerry P | February 3, 2009 at 11:30 am |

    [quote comment=”313207″][quote comment=”313197″][quote comment=”313194″][quote comment=”313192″]
    It is the bastardization of our language.

    I am often guilty of typing errors, as many of you here know, but laziness is no excuse.

    Your/You’re
    To/Too/Two

    Homonyms or Homophones…no Phil, not a pink Razr[/quote]

    Just to let you all know, the next person that writes “loose” when they mean “lose” (you know, the opposite of “win”), I’m burning your house down, trashing your car, and beating up your children.

    Nothing irritates me more. They aren’t even pronounced the same.[/quote]

    Here, on UW, a frequent grammar mistake is stripping in place of striping.

    I have also picked up on an invented word that my students have begun using with alarming frequency:

    Versing.

    Jhonny: Who are you versing today?
    Yadier: We are versing you, idiot!

    Aarrrghhhh, Notice how I avoided quotation marks as to not be a hypocrite.[/quote]

    My favorite new word is “conversate” instead of “talk”.[/quote]
    And I prefer “masticate” instead of “chew.” Try using that and see what kind of looks you get.

  • Teebz | February 3, 2009 at 11:30 am |

    Something that has bothered me since the whole “recession” talk started is the ridiculousness of the Manny Ramirez contract offers.

    We’re talking about one man who has turned down a $25 million offer from the Dodgers to show up for work for approximately 200 days.

    While I’m not suggesting the boycott of MLB, it might be time to let Manny be Manny at home while he and his agent realize that I won’t make $25 million in showing up for work for 200 years.

    Sure, he’s got Hall of Fame numbers, but rejecting $25 million for one season? What the crap?

  • Tony In Erie | February 3, 2009 at 11:31 am |

    I wish I got a $10 bailout for every time I was “subjected” to a porno clip

  • Ricko | February 3, 2009 at 11:31 am |

    [quote comment=”313214″][quote comment=”313210″]MLB announces ALS Awareness Campaign – players will wear patches on July 4, the 70th anniversary of Lou Gehrig’s speech…[/quote]

    When does the “commemorative patch” activity hit critical mass and move into overkill?[/quote]

    There’s a line, I think.
    I also think we need to look behind us to see it.

    —Ricko

    Dennis Leary: “Lou Gehrig died of Lou Gehrig’s Disease. They couldn’t see THAT coming?”

  • Teebz | February 3, 2009 at 11:32 am |

    [quote comment=”313216″]602 words on a freaking apostrophe.

    THIS is why you don’t pay a subscription fee for UniWatch.

    /just sayin'[/quote]

    And you show up here to get a lesson on using them. Make no mistake… I’ll be watching. LOL

  • Bruce Jaynes | February 3, 2009 at 11:33 am |

    The new Seibu duds look very similar to The Rice Owls….

    http://farm3.static....

  • NC | February 3, 2009 at 11:34 am |

    [quote comment=”313181″][quote comment=”313158″][quote comment=”313150″][quote comment=”313130″]Nice rant on apostrophe usage. Improper apostrophe use (its/it’s, etc.) drives me bananas and I never noticed the apparently common flipped usage you described until now. And now that will drive me crazy. Thanks Paul. :-)[/quote]

    Still doesn’t bug me as much as when your/you’re is misused. I used to commute by a sign for “Your Somebody” aerobics studio. …drove me nuts.[/quote]

    Exactly. You’re and your, it’s and its are not only far more annoying, but far worse, IMO. The more the single-open quote is used in incorrect ways, the more accepted and the norm it will become. I don’t think there is necessarily anything wrong with that.[/quote]

    No. No, no, no. Just because you say black is white over and over again, that doesn’t make it white, and it doesn’t make it OK. It’s still black.

    And an apostrophe is still an apostrophe. There’s a right way to use it and a wrong way. The failure to use it properly is largely a failure to THINK. And that’s not a small problem. The end.[/quote]

    Not to be a bastard, but I think it’s funny, Paul, that you went on a rant about apostrophes, then screwed up with punctuation yourself in the ticker:

    Our NFL White at Home” page, compiled by Tim Brulia, has now been updated to include info from the 2008 season.

  • Paul Lukas | February 3, 2009 at 11:35 am |

    [quote comment=”313216″]602 words on a freaking apostrophe.

    THIS is why you don’t pay a subscription fee for UniWatch.

    /just sayin'[/quote]

    Actually, you don’t pay a subscription fee cuz I’m a nice guy and choose not to charge one. But I might make an exception for you.

    Cracks me up when someone thinks I’m being too picky about something. Keep in mind that most of the world thinks you’re nuts for caring about most of the stuff that’s normally covered on this site. It’s all relative, kiddo — one man’s irrelevance is another’s world crisis, and if you draw the line between those two realms in a different spot than I do, guess which one of us is shit out of luck? The ultimate arbiter of what matters here is me, and the apostrophe catastrophe is every bit as important to me as logo creep, eradicating purple, and restoring stirrups to their rightful place of lower-leg supremacy.

    Just sayin’.

  • Liz | February 3, 2009 at 11:36 am |

    Those of us who study language and grammar know the fact that “errors” make it into our language permanently when their usage becomes common enough. Thus, it’s not accurate to say, “Just because you say black is white over and over again, that doesn’t make it white, and it doesn’t make it OK. It’s still black.”

    For an example, I offer “lifestyle,” which in its original grammatically correct version, was “life-style.”

    Or, “hopefully,” which historically should only be used in a sentence like, “Ben waited hopefully for his chance to make a last minute drive,” and should NOT be used in a sentence like, “Hopefully the Steelers will come back and score.” But again, the “incorrect” usage has become so common that it’s accepted.

    I lament the fact that lazyness has the power to change our language; I’d like an error to forever remain an error, just like Paul. I’d like people to pay attention to the words and punctuation they use. The simple fact, however, is that any language which is still spoken is constantly changing based on the ways its speakers actually use it. Nothing in a spoken language is ever black or white… it’s always gray.

  • Kurt | February 3, 2009 at 11:37 am |

    Wonder if they’ll also wear the patriotic caps on July 4 then charge $35 bucks for the replicas in the gift shop??

  • Liz | February 3, 2009 at 11:40 am |

    That being said, the errors still sicken me, and I loved this post. I used to allow my students take cell phone pictures of all the errors they saw in signs for bonus points… until the sheer volume of these errors made it impossible to continue the practice.

  • Teebz | February 3, 2009 at 11:41 am |

    [quote comment=”313226″]Those of us who study language and grammar know the fact that “errors” make it into our language permanently when their usage becomes common enough. Thus, it’s not accurate to say, “Just because you say black is white over and over again, that doesn’t make it white, and it doesn’t make it OK. It’s still black.”

    For an example, I offer “lifestyle,” which in its original grammatically correct version, was “life-style.”

    Or, “hopefully,” which historically should only be used in a sentence like, “Ben waited hopefully for his chance to make a last minute drive,” and should NOT be used in a sentence like, “Hopefully the Steelers will come back and score.” But again, the “incorrect” usage has become so common that it’s accepted.

    I lament the fact that lazyness has the power to change our language; I’d like an error to forever remain an error, just like Paul. I’d like people to pay attention to the words and punctuation they use. The simple fact, however, is that any language which is still spoken is constantly changing based on the ways its speakers actually use it. Nothing in a spoken language is ever black or white… it’s always gray.[/quote]

    “Loose” will never, ever become “lose”. And if it somehow does, I’ll be setting a lot of houses on fire, trashing a lot of cars, and beating up elementary schools of children.

  • Paul Lukas | February 3, 2009 at 11:42 am |

    [quote comment=”313226″]Those of us who study language and grammar know the fact that “errors” make it into our language permanently when their usage becomes common enough. Thus, it’s not accurate to say, “Just because you say black is white over and over again, that doesn’t make it white, and it doesn’t make it OK. It’s still black.”

    For an example, I offer “lifestyle,” which in its original grammatically correct version, was “life-style.”[/quote]

    Poor example. Yes, you can always point to things like “life-style” or “ain’t,” but those are isolated words, while the use of an apostrophe has the potential to rewrite style rules across the English language. You’re giving micro-examples; I’m talking about macro-usage that goes to the heart of what an apostrophe is (i.e., it stands in for letters/numbers that are missing). Apples and oranges.

  • Johnny O | February 3, 2009 at 11:44 am |

    OK, so totally not uni related, but how does one link youtube clips in HD? I know there is a link under the clip that says “watch in HD?”, but I want to know how to link those HD clips. Thanks!

  • anotherguy | February 3, 2009 at 11:45 am |

    I think William Perry was called for aiding the runner, and it was egregious: he did everything but pick up Walter Payton by the neck and belt and toss him over the goal line. :-)

    The Citigroup/Mets story: reported from Bangalore?? And that was a long way of saying “we’re searching for someone to pay off this contract for us”.

    From the NFL teams wearing white uni’s at home: wow, what a list. I thought it would be confined to the hot-weather teams and some NFC East teams trying to PO the Cowboys.

    Also, from that website: the Vikings wore white for a single quarter of a 1964 game? What’s the story there?

  • Mike | February 3, 2009 at 11:46 am |

    Great post today on the apostrophe. I consider myself somewhat of anal observer of punctuation and this one had slipped by me. Keep up the good fight Paul.

    Here’s a related question – what’s the proper way to write the plural of an abbreviated decade? I think it should be (the ’90s). I often see this (the 90’s) and it drives me nuts but might be technically ok. It surely can’t be (the ’90’s) right? (Use of parens. just to avoid apostrophe/quote confusion.)

  • Juan Grande | February 3, 2009 at 11:48 am |

    [quote comment=”313218″][quote comment=”313207″][quote comment=”313197″][quote comment=”313194″][quote comment=”313192″]
    It is the bastardization of our language.

    I am often guilty of typing errors, as many of you here know, but laziness is no excuse.

    Your/You’re
    To/Too/Two

    Homonyms or Homophones…no Phil, not a pink Razr[/quote]

    Just to let you all know, the next person that writes “loose” when they mean “lose” (you know, the opposite of “win”), I’m burning your house down, trashing your car, and beating up your children.

    Nothing irritates me more. They aren’t even pronounced the same.[/quote]

    Here, on UW, a frequent grammar mistake is stripping in place of striping.

    I have also picked up on an invented word that my students have begun using with alarming frequency:

    Versing.

    Jhonny: Who are you versing today?
    Yadier: We are versing you, idiot!

    Aarrrghhhh, Notice how I avoided quotation marks as to not be a hypocrite.[/quote]

    My favorite new word is “conversate” instead of “talk”.[/quote]
    And I prefer “masticate” instead of “chew.” Try using that and see what kind of looks you get.[/quote]

    Masticate is at least a legit word. Conversate is just stupid. If you really want to have fun, use the word “exacerbate” in regualr conversation.

  • Paul Lukas | February 3, 2009 at 11:48 am |

    [quote comment=”313233″]Here’s a related question – what’s the proper way to write the plural of an abbreviated decade? I think it should be (the ’90s). I often see this (the 90’s) and it drives me nuts but might be technically ok. It surely can’t be (the ’90’s) right? (Use of parens. just to avoid apostrophe/quote confusion.)[/quote]

    I always go with your preferred style — “the ’90s.” There are some style guides that go with other formats, however.

    Simple solution: “the Nineties.”

  • Tony In Erie | February 3, 2009 at 11:48 am |

    and beating up elementary schools of children.

    just make sure you pull the uni over their heads first

  • Teebz | February 3, 2009 at 11:48 am |

    [quote comment=”313233″]Great post today on the apostrophe. I consider myself somewhat of anal observer of punctuation and this one had slipped by me. Keep up the good fight Paul.

    Here’s a related question – what’s the proper way to write the plural of an abbreviated decade? I think it should be (the ’90s). I often see this (the 90’s) and it drives me nuts but might be technically ok. It surely can’t be (the ’90’s) right? (Use of parens. just to avoid apostrophe/quote confusion.)[/quote]

    It’s not possessive, so “90’s” or “’90’s” are entirely wrong.

    ’90s is the only acceptable form to me since the apostrophe replaces the “19” in 1990s.

  • Greenie | February 3, 2009 at 11:49 am |

    So, I ran through the comments quick, and alls I saw were stuff about apostrophes, grammar, advancing the runner and CitiBank, so I figure that I’ll be the first to link to this Yahoo.com story about how much they hate the Canadiens throwbacks.

    http://sports.yahoo....

  • Teebz | February 3, 2009 at 11:49 am |

    [quote comment=”313236″]and beating up elementary schools of children.

    just make sure you pull the uni over their heads first[/quote]

    Good call, Tony. No fighting straps = automatic suspensions too. LOL

  • Ricko | February 3, 2009 at 11:49 am |

    [quote comment=”313233″]Great post today on the apostrophe. I consider myself somewhat of anal observer of punctuation and this one had slipped by me. Keep up the good fight Paul.

    Here’s a related question – what’s the proper way to write the plural of an abbreviated decade? I think it should be (the ’90s). I often see this (the 90’s) and it drives me nuts but might be technically ok. It surely can’t be (the ’90’s) right? (Use of parens. just to avoid apostrophe/quote confusion.)[/quote]

    See post #41

  • LI Phil | February 3, 2009 at 11:50 am |

    [quote comment=”313232″]Also, from that website: the Vikings wore white for a single quarter of a 1964 game? What’s the story there?[/quote]

    i believe that was the infamous “all purple” game the vikes were forced to wear…pretty sure paul did a column on it…

    basically, vikes came to game in white jerseys and purple pants, and opposition (lions?) also had white jerseys…so vikes switched to purple jerseys after a spell

    /i could be wrong, but im pretty sure that’s what’s being described

  • Teebz | February 3, 2009 at 11:51 am |

    [quote comment=”313237″][quote comment=”313233″]Great post today on the apostrophe. I consider myself somewhat of anal observer of punctuation and this one had slipped by me. Keep up the good fight Paul.

    Here’s a related question – what’s the proper way to write the plural of an abbreviated decade? I think it should be (the ’90s). I often see this (the 90’s) and it drives me nuts but might be technically ok. It surely can’t be (the ’90’s) right? (Use of parens. just to avoid apostrophe/quote confusion.)[/quote]

    It’s not possessive, so “90’s” or “’90’s” are entirely wrong.

    ’90s is the only acceptable form to me since the apostrophe replaces the “19” in 1990s.[/quote]

    And I totally effed up the apostrophes in my comment. LOL

  • Juan Grande | February 3, 2009 at 11:52 am |

    [quote comment=”313220″]I wish I got a $10 bailout for every time I was “subjected” to a porno clip[/quote]

    Full frontal male nudity should earn me a triple digit credit!

  • Liz | February 3, 2009 at 11:53 am |

    I misspelled laziness, so I have lost credibility even with myself in this discussion, but I will agree, the size of the error does matter. At the same time, to write 08 without the apostrophe was once unacceptable. So in this case, the apostrophe usage has already changed. That is not to say that I think the single open-quote will legitimately replace the apostrophe, but theoretically, it could eventually become an “acceptable” usage (in which case I will still look down upon it).

  • anotherguy | February 3, 2009 at 11:55 am |

    [quote comment=”313241″]i believe that was the infamous “all purple” game the vikes were forced to wear…pretty sure paul did a column on it…

    basically, vikes came to game in white jerseys and purple pants, and opposition (lions?) also had white jerseys…so vikes switched to purple jerseys after a spell[/quote]Thank you for that information; wild to think that something like that was possible.

    In those (slightly) less TV-driven days, one would have thought that the refs would have taken charge before the game and had someone change shirts.

  • anotherguy | February 3, 2009 at 11:57 am |

    [quote comment=”313220″]I wish I got a $10 bailout for every time I was “subjected” to a porno clip[/quote]The obvious joke here is that usually cable companies charge you to watch porn rather than the other way around.

  • Tony In Erie | February 3, 2009 at 11:59 am |

    [quote comment=”313238″]So, I ran through the comments quick, and alls I saw were stuff about apostrophes, grammar, advancing the runner and CitiBank, so I figure that I’ll be the first to link to this Yahoo.com story about how much they hate the Canadiens throwbacks.

    http://sports.yahoo....

    I think Carey Price’s “leather” pads negate the oddity of the barber pole jerseys. And yes, a day later, I STILL hate that prison garb crap. Nothing will change my mind on that.

    I hope I see the Leafs win a Stanley Cup before I see that junk again.

  • LI Phil | February 3, 2009 at 11:59 am |

    [quote comment=”313245″][quote comment=”313241″]i believe that was the infamous “all purple” game the vikes were forced to wear…pretty sure paul did a column on it…

    basically, vikes came to game in white jerseys and purple pants, and opposition (lions?) also had white jerseys…so vikes switched to purple jerseys after a spell[/quote]Thank you for that information; wild to think that something like that was possible.

    In those (slightly) less TV-driven days, one would have thought that the refs would have taken charge before the game and had someone change shirts.[/quote]

    here it is before and after

    (those pics came courtesy of Lwiedy)

  • Teebz | February 3, 2009 at 12:03 pm |

    [quote comment=”313247″][quote comment=”313238″]So, I ran through the comments quick, and alls I saw were stuff about apostrophes, grammar, advancing the runner and CitiBank, so I figure that I’ll be the first to link to this Yahoo.com story about how much they hate the Canadiens throwbacks.

    http://sports.yahoo....

    I think Carey Price’s “leather” pads negate the oddity of the barber pole jerseys. And yes, a day later, I STILL hate that prison garb crap. Nothing will change my mind on that.

    I hope I see the Leafs win a Stanley Cup before I see that junk again.[/quote]

    I’ll take that bet, Tony. What are the odds that you’ll see that stuff again before the Leafs win a Cup? ;o) LOL

  • Tony In Erie | February 3, 2009 at 12:04 pm |

    [quote comment=”313243″][quote comment=”313220″]I wish I got a $10 bailout for every time I was “subjected” to a porno clip[/quote]

    Full frontal male nudity should earn me a triple digit credit![/quote]

    “Who am I?!”
    “Is this a test, sir?”
    “No, it is not a test.”
    “You’re Mr. Durden.”

  • Ricko | February 3, 2009 at 12:05 pm |

    [quote comment=”313238″]So, I ran through the comments quick, and alls I saw were stuff about apostrophes, grammar, advancing the runner and CitiBank, so I figure that I’ll be the first to link to this Yahoo.com story about how much they hate the Canadiens throwbacks.

    http://sports.yahoo....

    Said this over the weekend. Throwbacks are meant to be Conversation Pieces, not “Handsome Uniforms of History.” Sometimes teams wear them BECAUSE they look so god-awful by today’s styles and standards. What about that concept is so hard for these allegedly insightful writers, columnists and bloggers to grasp? Do they think they’re impressing us with their brilliance by spotting that those Habs’ throwbacks looked garish and ridiculous? Or the same for the Eagles’ yellow-gold & powder blue? Of COURSE, they do; that’s WHY THEY WORE THEM. So keep giving us your fashion insight there, all you sporting goods Sherlocks; you’re frickin’ geniuses when it comes to aesthetics. What would we do without you. What you gonna report tomorrow, that the sky is blue? Stand up, maybe so much won’t go over your heads.

    Sheesh.

    —Ricko

  • anotherguy | February 3, 2009 at 12:06 pm |

    [quote comment=”313248″]here it is before and after

    (those pics came courtesy of Lwiedy)[/quote]That must have stuck out like a sore thumb in 1964, but (sadly, IMHO) the all-dark uniforms are more common in the NFL today.

    Those pictures reminded me of a college basketball game (Illinois vs. Wisconsin) where each team wore a dark uniform. The players had no problem, but TV (of course) stepped in and rules were created to ban it. Back in 1964, I wonder if the players had a problem, or whether it was the refs/television?

  • warren thompson | February 3, 2009 at 12:07 pm |

    More bastardized language: I’ve often heard clergy say that (in the Fellowship Room) we “fellowshipped” with each other. AARGH!

  • Duck | February 3, 2009 at 12:11 pm |

    [quote comment=”313177″][quote comment=”313170″]But, when you’re already reliant on your computer for help, and it hinders you, is it really you’re fault? [/quote]

    Absolutely 100% yes. Your computer doesn’t write the document for you. You do.

    Your computer is a tool for putting words on paper. Would you blame the pen if you were hand-writing the document?[/quote]

    Well considering my pen doesn’t suddenly jump out of my hand and cross out my correctly written apostrophe only to replace it with the incorrect open quote sign, I’d say those are 2 different circumstances, wouldn’t you? I’m not saying my poor writing/typing isn’t my fault, I was just saying having computer programs that incorrectly interpret what I write and automatically change it aren’t helping. From day one in keyboarding class, circa 15 years or so ago, we were told by our teachers and the books that that key on the keyboard was for an apostrophe, I’d always assumed that to get the open quote you had to pick it out of the drop-down symbols list. Until today I had no idea it was for both or that it would switch itself automatically based upon some apparently flawed logic, and I doubt I’m the only one.

  • Christopher | February 3, 2009 at 12:11 pm |

    [quote comment=”313230″][quote comment=”313226″]Those of us who study language and grammar know the fact that “errors” make it into our language permanently when their usage becomes common enough. Thus, it’s not accurate to say, “Just because you say black is white over and over again, that doesn’t make it white, and it doesn’t make it OK. It’s still black.”

    For an example, I offer “lifestyle,” which in its original grammatically correct version, was “life-style.”[/quote]

    Poor example. Yes, you can always point to things like “life-style” or “ain’t,” but those are isolated words, while the use of an apostrophe has the potential to rewrite style rules across the English language. You’re giving micro-examples; I’m talking about macro-usage that goes to the heart of what an apostrophe is (i.e., it stands in for letters/numbers that are missing). Apples and oranges.[/quote]

    Agreed. Words are a different animal. We speak words, and they get bastardized and then become “correct”.

    Had a debate over the term “y’all” not too long ago. “You all” is not seen as correct English by some, and others think its fine. Pretty soon it WILL be correct English.

    Spelling is the same way, it changes over time (colour, color).

    But punctuation is not that flexible. It is the foundation of written language- meant to point out what words and phrases actually mean. That HAS to be standardized.

    “color” and “colour” mean the same thing. “You all” means the same as “everyone”. But “it’s” and “its” DO NOT mean the same thing and never will.

  • Matt from L.A. | February 3, 2009 at 12:12 pm |

    Great stuff today Paul. I teach PE and hear the “versing” word at a disturbing rate. I am very quick to correct any student at my school and let them know that the word they just used is not a word at all.

    I also believe that instant messaging and texting is ruining proper communication for a generation. Yesterday I overheard a conversation between two students that basically went as follows.

    Jordan: “That was so funny!”
    Becky: “I know, L. O. L.”

    I was about to say something to them but held back. I could not believe my ears.

  • Stuby | February 3, 2009 at 12:15 pm |

    So, I’ve always wondered if this logo is grammatically correct:

    http://baseball_gal....

    Are they going for a contraction or are they using it as a plural?

  • Ricko | February 3, 2009 at 12:17 pm |

    [quote comment=”313258″]So, I’ve always wondered if this logo is grammatically correct:

    http://baseball_gal....

    Are they going for a contraction or are they using it as a plural?[/quote]

    Contraction. “thletic” is missing, hence the apostrophe.

  • Alex | February 3, 2009 at 12:20 pm |

    Thanks for the new pet peeve.

  • Teebz | February 3, 2009 at 12:20 pm |

    [quote comment=”313255″][quote comment=”313177″][quote comment=”313170″]But, when you’re already reliant on your computer for help, and it hinders you, is it really you’re fault? [/quote]

    Absolutely 100% yes. Your computer doesn’t write the document for you. You do.

    Your computer is a tool for putting words on paper. Would you blame the pen if you were hand-writing the document?[/quote]

    Well considering my pen doesn’t suddenly jump out of my hand and cross out my correctly written apostrophe only to replace it with the incorrect open quote sign, I’d say those are 2 different circumstances, wouldn’t you? I’m not saying my poor writing/typing isn’t my fault, I was just saying having computer programs that incorrectly interpret what I write and automatically change it aren’t helping.[/quote]

    No. Not at all. The pen and the computer function in the exact same manner – they produce what you want written on paper.

    Not knowing that the apostrophe is wrong is entirely within your control. You can correct what is written on your monitor by simply hitting the backspace or using white-out with the pen.

    However, if you don’t know it’s wrong, why would you correct it? Don’t blame the tool for the operator’s problem.

    Computers do exactly what you tell them to do, and nothing else.

  • Mark K | February 3, 2009 at 12:21 pm |

    This “blog” is always fun…

    http://www.unnecessa...

  • Wes | February 3, 2009 at 12:23 pm |

    Sorry to break up the punctuation discussion but I have a uni-related question. How did the Maravich’s get their socks to look like that? Did they stretch them? Can you actually buy loose-fitting athletic socks, as opposed to the one-size-fits-all tube sock that I’ve always seen/worn?

  • diz | February 3, 2009 at 12:24 pm |

    Re: Apostrophe Catastrophes –

    This man was known as THE Apostrophe Catastrophe during his time in Britain, with Rangers and Newcastle United. His name? Stéphane Guivarc’h

  • Joe | February 3, 2009 at 12:26 pm |

    Paul — Great main entry. I did my undergrad at a school that had Bulldogs for a mascot. In sports writing, we would refer to them as the ‘Dogs. We would go through the entire paper every week and make sure the apostrophe would face the right way. Since then, I have grown to note and loathe this trend. It’s nice to know I’m not a alone.

  • Teebz | February 3, 2009 at 12:32 pm |

    [quote comment=”313264″]Re: Apostrophe Catastrophes –

    This man was known as THE Apostrophe Catastrophe during his time in Britain, with Rangers and Newcastle United. His name? Stéphane Guivarc’h[/quote]

    That would be a fabulous UniWatch card – vertical stripes and a proper apostrophe!

  • theterrible | February 3, 2009 at 12:34 pm |

    If your designer is using MS Word for his/her work, you’ve probably already lost.

  • Scott | February 3, 2009 at 12:37 pm |

    Interesting comments in the T Proctor section about NFL franchises and their (previous) agreements with local uniform manufacturers.

    When you think about it, it’s actually appalling what the NFL, NBA, et al, have done to their leagues. They’ve taken away the opportunity for localization with businesses. This is comparable to your local restaurant franchise being FORCED to purchase food products from their franchisor’s commissary, essentially skipping the local farmer who produces eggs, tomatoes, whatever.

    There’s a reason why people skip restaurant franchises altogether (ubiquity). Yet, there’s really no recourse for sports fans. Brings up an interesting point if I were a sports franchise owner, I’d demand some autonomy to purchase goods/services … ala the Yanks and Cowboys with their marketing agreements.

  • Tom V | February 3, 2009 at 12:40 pm |

    [quote comment=”313251″][quote comment=”313238″]So, I ran through the comments quick, and alls I saw were stuff about apostrophes, grammar, advancing the runner and CitiBank, so I figure that I’ll be the first to link to this Yahoo.com story about how much they hate the Canadiens throwbacks.

    http://sports.yahoo....

    Said this over the weekend. Throwbacks are meant to be Conversation Pieces, not “Handsome Uniforms of History.” Sometimes teams wear them BECAUSE they look so god-awful by today’s styles and standards. What about that concept is so hard for these allegedly insightful writers, columnists and bloggers to grasp? Do they think they’re impressing us with their brilliance by spotting that those Habs’ throwbacks looked garish and ridiculous? Or the same for the Eagles’ yellow-gold & powder blue? Of COURSE, they do; that’s WHY THEY WORE THEM. So keep giving us your fashion insight there, all you sporting goods Sherlocks; you’re frickin’ geniuses when it comes to aesthetics. What would we do without you. What you gonna report tomorrow, that the sky is blue? Stand up, maybe so much won’t go over your heads.

    Sheesh.

    —Ricko[/quote]

    I happened upon the same page at yahoo before it appeared here, and thought to myself the exact same thing you did Phil, some yahoo sports guy looking at hockey pictures and decides thats the ugliest jersey he’s ever seen, he’s got to write a blog about it!

    I mean, people who follow hockey know what’s going on in Montreal this year. I liked the jerseys. Great for a game or two. Yet some bozo who doesn’t know his arse from elbow about hockey or uniforms is passing judgment. Blech.

  • Ricko | February 3, 2009 at 12:41 pm |

    [quote comment=”313263″]Sorry to break up the punctuation discussion but I have a uni-related question. How did the Maravich’s get their socks to look like that? Did they stretch them? Can you actually buy loose-fitting athletic socks, as opposed to the one-size-fits-all tube sock that I’ve always seen/worn?[/quote]

    Pistol wore old time wool athletic socks (Wigwam was one famous manufacturer) and whatever elasticity they had usually was gone after a few washings. Sooner if bleach was used. When in the NBA, even if his team wore colored knee highs, Maravich still wore his floppies with them. I have a number in my files of photos of him wearing them with three different Hawks color schemes (including the lime and royal) and with the Jazz. I’ll scan and flickr them when I get home. Say, 7:30 CST or so.

    —Ricko

  • Juan Grande | February 3, 2009 at 12:41 pm |

    [quote comment=”313263″]Sorry to break up the punctuation discussion but I have a uni-related question. How did the Maravich’s get their socks to look like that? Did they stretch them? Can you actually buy loose-fitting athletic socks, as opposed to the one-size-fits-all tube sock that I’ve always seen/worn?[/quote]

    We used to that to our socks in high school. You just carefully snip the elastic in the stripey part of the sock. then pull out the elastic strands and PRESTO, slouchy socks!

  • Jeff P | February 3, 2009 at 12:42 pm |

    [quote comment=”313261″][quote comment=”313255″][quote comment=”313177″][quote comment=”313170″]But, when you’re already reliant on your computer for help, and it hinders you, is it really you’re fault? [/quote]

    Absolutely 100% yes. Your computer doesn’t write the document for you. You do.

    Your computer is a tool for putting words on paper. Would you blame the pen if you were hand-writing the document?[/quote]

    Well considering my pen doesn’t suddenly jump out of my hand and cross out my correctly written apostrophe only to replace it with the incorrect open quote sign, I’d say those are 2 different circumstances, wouldn’t you? I’m not saying my poor writing/typing isn’t my fault, I was just saying having computer programs that incorrectly interpret what I write and automatically change it aren’t helping.[/quote]

    No. Not at all. The pen and the computer function in the exact same manner – they produce what you want written on paper.

    Not knowing that the apostrophe is wrong is entirely within your control. You can correct what is written on your monitor by simply hitting the backspace or using white-out with the pen.

    However, if you don’t know it’s wrong, why would you correct it? Don’t blame the tool for the operator’s problem.

    Computers do exactly what you tell them to do, and nothing else.[/quote]
    No, not really. Computers do exactly what the programmer tells them to do, not you. When you type in many programs, the programmer has told the computer to change the apostrophe to the wrong version. If he had written the word processor himself or was using notepad, it’s his problem. If not, he’s just typing and it’s a major pain to tell the correct the computer.

  • Wes | February 3, 2009 at 12:47 pm |

    Ricko and Juan,
    Thanks for your responses! I always know I can get a quick answer to any question on Uni Watch!

  • Ricko | February 3, 2009 at 12:47 pm |

    [quote comment=”313273″][quote comment=”313263″]Sorry to break up the punctuation discussion but I have a uni-related question. How did the Maravich’s get their socks to look like that? Did they stretch them? Can you actually buy loose-fitting athletic socks, as opposed to the one-size-fits-all tube sock that I’ve always seen/worn?[/quote]

    We used to that to our socks in high school. You just carefully snip the elastic in the stripey part of the sock. then pull out the elastic strands and PRESTO, slouchy socks![/quote]

    Yup, that’d work. Maravich, though, almost never wore striped socks slouchy…only the plain athletic socks, which sometimes were worn at the base of (or over) his team’s striped socks…at least with the Hawks and Jazz, that is. Didn’t want to correct his son, but now that it’s come up, guess I sorta am.

    —Ricko

  • Ricko | February 3, 2009 at 12:50 pm |

    If you ever want to test the way bleach changes elastic material, bleach a pair of your compression shorts a couple times. They’ll stretch to your knees. I know, I have one pair that look like football pants. LOL

    Great way to ruin wristbands or knee/ankle/elbow sleeves, too.

    —Ricko

  • Duck | February 3, 2009 at 12:53 pm |

    [quote comment=”313261″][quote comment=”313255″][quote comment=”313177″][quote comment=”313170″]But, when you’re already reliant on your computer for help, and it hinders you, is it really you’re fault? [/quote]

    Absolutely 100% yes. Your computer doesn’t write the document for you. You do.

    Your computer is a tool for putting words on paper. Would you blame the pen if you were hand-writing the document?[/quote]

    Well considering my pen doesn’t suddenly jump out of my hand and cross out my correctly written apostrophe only to replace it with the incorrect open quote sign, I’d say those are 2 different circumstances, wouldn’t you? I’m not saying my poor writing/typing isn’t my fault, I was just saying having computer programs that incorrectly interpret what I write and automatically change it aren’t helping.[/quote]

    No. Not at all. The pen and the computer function in the exact same manner – they produce what you want written on paper.

    Not knowing that the apostrophe is wrong is entirely within your control. You can correct what is written on your monitor by simply hitting the backspace or using white-out with the pen.

    However, if you don’t know it’s wrong, why would you correct it? Don’t blame the tool for the operator’s problem.

    Computers do exactly what you tell them to do, and nothing else.[/quote]

    You have to be kidding me, right? You think a program incorrectly fixing something, is somehow the same as using whiteout? Apparently you see yourself as a ranking member of the grammar police, and that’s fine. But if you can’t possibly see how a layman would make the mistake of not catching something strange the computer does with flip flopping symbols? Gimme a break. Not all of us were English majors or spent our entire childhood memorizing macros, some of us just like being able to communicate with each other. Don’t get me wrong though, I appreciate these type of articles. I don’t like having bad grammar/punctuation and if reading something like this helps me catch a mistake down the road, then great. But this holier than thou stance isn’t cute.

  • SWC Susan (aka Tex) | February 3, 2009 at 12:54 pm |

    [quote comment=”313255″][quote comment=”313177″][quote comment=”313170″]But, when you’re already reliant on your computer for help, and it hinders you, is it really you’re fault? [/quote]

    Absolutely 100% yes. Your computer doesn’t write the document for you. You do.

    Your computer is a tool for putting words on paper. Would you blame the pen if you were hand-writing the document?[/quote]

    Well considering my pen doesn’t suddenly jump out of my hand and cross out my correctly written apostrophe only to replace it with the incorrect open quote sign, I’d say those are 2 different circumstances, wouldn’t you? I’m not saying my poor writing/typing isn’t my fault, I was just saying having computer programs that incorrectly interpret what I write and automatically change it aren’t helping. From day one in keyboarding class, circa 15 years or so ago, we were told by our teachers and the books that that key on the keyboard was for an apostrophe, I’d always assumed that to get the open quote you had to pick it out of the drop-down symbols list. Until today I had no idea it was for both or that it would switch itself automatically based upon some apparently flawed logic, and I doubt I’m the only one.[/quote]

    Agreed – if you type a word, it works fine. Why would anyone think that the idiots who write code today would make the computer try to tell me what I was writing? I had no idea Word (or any other program) was flipping the apostrophe into a single open quote….

  • Tony In Erie | February 3, 2009 at 1:00 pm |

    Contraction. “thletic” is missing, hence the apostrophe.

    I may sound like an idiot, but whats the difference between A’s and O’s and Pens and Nats?

    Aren’t the latter two also contraction?

    3. a shortened form of a word or group of words, with the omitted letters often replaced in written English by an apostrophe, as e’er for ever, isn’t for is not, dep’t for department.

    So shouldn’t it be Pen’s and Nat’s?

  • Teebz | February 3, 2009 at 1:02 pm |

    [quote comment=”313274″]
    No, not really. Computers do exactly what the programmer tells them to do, not you.[/quote]

    Oh really? So when it comes to grammar, the programmer is to blame? Not the person typing?

    [quote comment=”313274″]When you type in many programs, the programmer has told the computer to change the apostrophe to the wrong version.[/quote]

    Fallacy – “when YOU type” means you’re agreeing that the program is correct. Which is entirely and wholly the reason why people don’t know the difference.

    [quote comment=”313274″]If he had written the word processor himself or was using notepad, it’s his problem. If not, he’s just typing and it’s a major pain to tell the correct the computer.[/quote]

    Despite that being a fairly mangled sentence, if it’s a major pain to write correctly, maybe that user shouldn’t write at all.

    Again, the problem lies with YOU. If YOU know it’s wrong, YOU‘ll change it. That’s why the alt-codes are still used by a large number of people (myself included).

    Why does everyone blame someone else? If you don’t know it’s wrong, you accept that the program is right. That kind of thought process is what allowed Madoff to blow through millions of other peoples’ monies. Do your damned homework!

  • Roger Faso | February 3, 2009 at 1:05 pm |

    “I can already tell that this sandwich, this one, the one right here, the one I am holding, is going to be the most most delicious sandwich I’ve ever put in my mouth. I can’t wait to totally devour it. Right after you take my picture, I’m gonna dive right into this thing. Don’t even try talking to me while I’m eating this sandwich. So hungry.”

    http://www.mad.co.uk...

  • Teebz | February 3, 2009 at 1:10 pm |

    [quote comment=”313278″]
    You have to be kidding me, right? You think a program incorrectly fixing something, is somehow the same as using whiteout? Apparently you see yourself as a ranking member of the grammar police, and that’s fine. But if you can’t possibly see how a layman would make the mistake of not catching something strange the computer does with flip flopping symbols? Gimme a break. Not all of us were English majors or spent our entire childhood memorizing macros, some of us just like being able to communicate with each other. Don’t get me wrong though, I appreciate these type of articles. I don’t like having bad grammar/punctuation and if reading something like this helps me catch a mistake down the road, then great. But this holier than thou stance isn’t cute.[/quote]

    Wow. The assumption train is running on high today, isn’t it?

    I work on computers all day as an IT professional, and I took English in school.

    I’m pretty certain I understand the logic of how computers work. If you didn’t know that it was wrong, why are you blaming the computer?

    The computer can’t reason what is right and what is wrong. It just does exactly what you tell it to. Just because you didn’t know doesn’t mean someone will fix the problem.

    And if Microsoft coded something wrong, I suggest you review their track records with Microsoft ME, Microsoft Vista, and all the service packs for every other edition of Microsoft O/Ses that have been released.

    You’re the one doing the writing. You’re the one responsible for its accuracy and correctness. Where does the computer factor in?

  • Mike V. | February 3, 2009 at 1:14 pm |

    All this apostrophe miss-use can be solved with a simple catchy slogan. For example, “I before E except after C.”

    I propose “Open quotes sink boats”

    Any other suggestions?

  • Dane | February 3, 2009 at 1:14 pm |

    A link in today’s TMQ column on ESPN.com leads to this article, claiming that uniform color is correlated to success:

    http://www.spiegel.d...

  • ALK | February 3, 2009 at 1:18 pm |

    I had one of those surf topps books for the tigers when I was little. I loved that book and it definately was the source of my interest in baseball history.

  • LI Phil | February 3, 2009 at 1:21 pm |

    teebz, your fighting a loosing battle

  • Teebz | February 3, 2009 at 1:22 pm |

    [quote comment=”313288″]teebz, your fighting a loosing battle[/quote]

    Your luckie u hav know child.

  • MPowers1634 | February 3, 2009 at 1:22 pm |

    [quote comment=”313263″]Sorry to break up the punctuation discussion but I have a uni-related question. How did the Maravich’s get their socks to look like that? Did they stretch them? Can you actually buy loose-fitting athletic socks, as opposed to the one-size-fits-all tube sock that I’ve always seen/worn?[/quote]

    They are affectionately referred to as quitters.

  • MPowers1634 | February 3, 2009 at 1:24 pm |

    [quote comment=”313284″][quote comment=”313278″]
    You have to be kidding me, right? You think a program incorrectly fixing something, is somehow the same as using whiteout? Apparently you see yourself as a ranking member of the grammar police, and that’s fine. But if you can’t possibly see how a layman would make the mistake of not catching something strange the computer does with flip flopping symbols? Gimme a break. Not all of us were English majors or spent our entire childhood memorizing macros, some of us just like being able to communicate with each other. Don’t get me wrong though, I appreciate these type of articles. I don’t like having bad grammar/punctuation and if reading something like this helps me catch a mistake down the road, then great. But this holier than thou stance isn’t cute.[/quote]

    Wow. The assumption train is running on high today, isn’t it?

    I work on computers all day as an IT professional, and I took English in school.quote]

    Does that make you bi-lingual?

  • JRJR | February 3, 2009 at 1:24 pm |

    [quote comment=”313283″]”I can already tell that this sandwich, this one, the one right here, the one I am holding, is going to be the most most delicious sandwich I’ve ever put in my mouth. I can’t wait to totally devour it. Right after you take my picture, I’m gonna dive right into this thing. Don’t even try talking to me while I’m eating this sandwich. So hungry.”

    http://www.mad.co.uk...

    I believe what you meant was–SOOOOOOO HUNGRY DUDE

  • Teebz | February 3, 2009 at 1:25 pm |

    [quote comment=”313291″]
    Does that make you bi-lingual?[/quote]

    Not really. Microsoft’s language is more confusing than Cyrillic. I can make out words, but I can’t code worth a damn. I’m no programmer. LOL

  • LI Phil | February 3, 2009 at 1:29 pm |

    [quote]Does that make you bi-lingual? [/quote]

    he speaks canadian and english

  • Teebz | February 3, 2009 at 1:34 pm |

    [quote comment=”313294″][quote]Does that make you bi-lingual? [/quote]

    he speaks canadian and english[/quote]

    Beauty, eh! Take off, hoser.

  • Teebz | February 3, 2009 at 1:35 pm |

    [quote comment=”313295″][quote comment=”313294″][quote]Does that make you bi-lingual? [/quote]

    he speaks canadian and english[/quote]

    Beauty, eh! Take off, hoser.[/quote]

    Weird, that didn’t work.

    Beauty, eh! Take off, hoser. – Canadian
    Nice one! Leave me alone. – English
    Ferme-la! Tabarnacle. – French

    Tri-lingual? LOL

  • mtjaws | February 3, 2009 at 1:37 pm |

    [quote comment=”313193″]I’ve always found this apostrophe usage kind of curious…

    http://www.landsend....

    That apostrophe usage isn’t too awkward, but the ones that always look and sound bad to me are these two:
    http://www.ruthschri...
    http://www.jacklinks...

    As for the shortened version of “until”, I absolutely hate seeing it written as “till”. There was never a second L, so why add another one? An apostrophe before ’til is proper, but I simply prefer it without (til).

  • MPowers1634 | February 3, 2009 at 1:40 pm |

    [quote comment=”313294″][quote]Does that make you bi-lingual? [/quote]

    he speaks canadian and english[/quote]

    Thank you for understanding.

    I guess my humor was lost in translation.

  • Roger Faso | February 3, 2009 at 1:43 pm |

    Is this true?

    http://sports.yahoo....

    Does anyone have video footage they can post?

  • Dane | February 3, 2009 at 1:48 pm |

    [quote comment=”313300″]Is this true?

    http://sports.yahoo....

    Does anyone have video footage they can post?[/quote]

    http://awfulannounci...

  • Patrick | February 3, 2009 at 1:53 pm |

    As long as we’re on the subject, the use of “definately” instead of “definitely” drives me up the fucking wall.

  • Dan Tearle | February 3, 2009 at 1:55 pm |

    Loved today’s article as I was only discussing a similar thing with my Dad the other week.
    Here in England, we’ve always referred to misused apostrophes as “Greengrocer’s Apostrophes” because of the timeworn tradition of market traders giving everything an apostrophe – Apple’s, Orange’s and Grape’s everywhere!
    You see this kind of apostrophe abuse so often, and when they’re used the wrong way round as well…!
    There is such a trend for apostrophes to be stuck on to every plural these days – so much so that I have to re-check myself to see if I’m right!

  • Teebz | February 3, 2009 at 1:57 pm |

    [quote comment=”313303″]Loved today’s article as I was only discussing a similar thing with my Dad the other week.
    Here in England, we’ve always referred to misused apostrophes as “Greengrocer’s Apostrophes” because of the timeworn tradition of market traders giving everything an apostrophe – Apple’s, Orange’s and Grape’s everywhere!
    You see this kind of apostrophe abuse so often, and when they’re used the wrong way round as well…!
    There is such a trend for apostrophes to be stuck on to every plural these days – so much so that I have to re-check myself to see if I’m right![/quote]

    Don’t check if you’re using a Windows-based PC, though. The computer is never wrong. Just roll with it.

  • Roger Faso | February 3, 2009 at 1:59 pm |

    [quote comment=”313301″][quote comment=”313300″]Is this true?

    http://sports.yahoo....

    Does anyone have video footage they can post?[/quote]

    http://awfulannounci...

    That’s great. Thanks for the link.

  • bfrench | February 3, 2009 at 2:00 pm |

    When I was in high school once a penalty was called on us because the running back was holding the jersey of the blocker in front of him

  • Dan Tearle | February 3, 2009 at 2:00 pm |

    [quote comment=”313304″][quote comment=”313303″]Loved today’s article as I was only discussing a similar thing with my Dad the other week.
    Here in England, we’ve always referred to misused apostrophes as “Greengrocer’s Apostrophes” because of the timeworn tradition of market traders giving everything an apostrophe – Apple’s, Orange’s and Grape’s everywhere!
    You see this kind of apostrophe abuse so often, and when they’re used the wrong way round as well…!
    There is such a trend for apostrophes to be stuck on to every plural these days – so much so that I have to re-check myself to see if I’m right![/quote]

    Don’t check if you’re using a Windows-based PC, though. The computer is never wrong. Just roll with it.[/quote]

    It’s more my own handwriting I check on, I just hate to have lazy grammar – mistakes I can deal with, but laziness is another matter.
    Is “text speak” as big a concern in America as it is over here?

  • Juan Grande | February 3, 2009 at 2:01 pm |

    [quote comment=”313297″][quote comment=”313193″]I’ve always found this apostrophe usage kind of curious…

    http://www.landsend....

    That apostrophe usage isn’t too awkward, but the ones that always look and sound bad to me are these two:
    http://www.ruthschri...
    http://www.jacklinks...

    As for the shortened version of “until”, I absolutely hate seeing it written as “till”. There was never a second L, so why add another one? An apostrophe before ’til is proper, but I simply prefer it without (til).[/quote]

    Better yet, why is a five letter word have an abbreviation? By the time you add the apostrophe, the word is only one space shorter. It is like writing “Mar” instead of “March”. Does the extra two letters really make a difference?

  • Nick | February 3, 2009 at 2:09 pm |

    I think the apostrophe looks better when it’s used incorrectly. When it faces the remaining part of the word it produces a closed effect that is cleaner than a “correctly” used apostrophe.

    And I know that it’s function is to remind the reader that part of the word has been dropped off, but remember that it is a SYMBOL. The apostrophe doesn’t have any structural function, and so a backwards apostrophe will serve just as well as a reminder as an outward one.

  • LI Phil | February 3, 2009 at 2:14 pm |

    [quote]Is “text speak” as big a concern in America as it is over here?[/quote]

    lolz

  • Teebz | February 3, 2009 at 2:15 pm |

    [quote comment=”313311″][quote]Is “text speak” as big a concern in America as it is over here?[/quote]

    lolz[/quote]

    i

  • Mark K | February 3, 2009 at 2:16 pm |

    Laughing @ Teebz post #148 where his bold “you’ll” has a backward apostrophe. HAHAHA

  • Teebz | February 3, 2009 at 2:17 pm |

    [quote comment=”313312″][quote comment=”313311″][quote]Is “text speak” as big a concern in America as it is over here?[/quote]

    lolz[/quote]

    i[/quote]

    Dammit… stupid HTML codes. It was supposed to read “i [heart] ur ?”

    See? I’m no programmer, Matt. LOL

  • Teebz | February 3, 2009 at 2:20 pm |

    [quote comment=”313313″]Laughing @ Teebz post #148 where his bold “you’ll” has a backward apostrophe. HAHAHA[/quote]

    But the computer is never wrong, Mark. I should never question it. Ever.

  • Ricko | February 3, 2009 at 2:20 pm |

    Well, if ever there were any doubt that UWers would be classified as being among the “detail-oriented”…

    I, am course, am not like that at all…except for having to find those photos of Pete Maravich’s floppy socks to share when I get home.

    Other than that, no resemblance.

    —Ricko

  • Ricko | February 3, 2009 at 2:24 pm |

    I, OF course, am not like…

    (Damn. Sucks when writing at work. Sometimes just gotta “send” and look busy).

  • mmwatkin | February 3, 2009 at 2:24 pm |

    apostrophewatch.com

    Next time, just put up the “gone fishing” sign…

  • werthj | February 3, 2009 at 2:31 pm |

    A day late, a dollar short, and off topic, but my girlfriend ran across a story about the Canadiens barbershop jerseys this morning, and emailed to ask me my opinion. I sent her the links from yesterday’s (appropriate apostrophe!) ticker, and she replied with the following opinion:

    Those jerseys MAKE me chuckle and it was no surprise to open up the last pic and see a fight –I wanna punch them for looking like little kids out there- LOL!!! They look so fuzzy I just wann hug ‘em or wear their jerseys to bed on a cold winter night to be warmed by what appears to be fleece-they should make them like that and sell them as pjs. It reminds me of that Fresh Prince when Will had to wear the giant sunflower in front of the whole school to graduate. (How embarrassing!)

    No matter whether I agree or disagree, I am proud.

  • pk | February 3, 2009 at 2:34 pm |

    [quote comment=”313293″][quote comment=”313291″]
    Does that make you bi-lingual?[/quote]

    Not really. Microsoft’s language is more confusing than Cyrillic. I can make out words, but I can’t code worth a damn. I’m no programmer. LOL[/quote]

    Cyrillic is actually quite easy…there are no “silent” letters or sounds…

  • Teebz | February 3, 2009 at 2:36 pm |

    [quote comment=”313320″][quote comment=”313293″][quote comment=”313291″]
    Does that make you bi-lingual?[/quote]

    Not really. Microsoft’s language is more confusing than Cyrillic. I can make out words, but I can’t code worth a damn. I’m no programmer. LOL[/quote]

    Cyrillic is actually quite easy…there are no “silent” letters or sounds…[/quote]

    Yeah, but learning the alphabet for someone just learning? Not literally Greek, but “it’s Greek to me”. ;o)

  • Kek | February 3, 2009 at 2:37 pm |

    [quote comment=”313302″]As long as we’re on the subject, the use of “definately” instead of “definitely” drives me up the fucking wall.[/quote]
    Isn’t that just a misspelled word? Not really usage/punctuation issues.

    While we’re on the topic, I love the unnecessary quotes blog

    http://www.unnecessa...

  • pk | February 3, 2009 at 2:39 pm |

    [quote comment=”313321″][quote comment=”313320″][quote comment=”313293″][quote comment=”313291″]
    Does that make you bi-lingual?[/quote]

    Not really. Microsoft’s language is more confusing than Cyrillic. I can make out words, but I can’t code worth a damn. I’m no programmer. LOL[/quote]

    Cyrillic is actually quite easy…there are no “silent” letters or sounds…[/quote]

    Yeah, but learning the alphabet for someone just learning? Not literally Greek, but “it’s Greek to me”. ;o)[/quote]

    Teebz, as much as you are into Hockey, I gaurantee you that if you simply start reading some of the Russian jersey’s you’d learn very, very quickly!!

    no coke, pepsi…

  • Teebz | February 3, 2009 at 2:41 pm |

    [quote comment=”313323″][quote comment=”313321″][quote comment=”313320″][quote comment=”313293″][quote comment=”313291″]
    Does that make you bi-lingual?[/quote]

    Not really. Microsoft’s language is more confusing than Cyrillic. I can make out words, but I can’t code worth a damn. I’m no programmer. LOL[/quote]

    Cyrillic is actually quite easy…there are no “silent” letters or sounds…[/quote]

    Yeah, but learning the alphabet for someone just learning? Not literally Greek, but “it’s Greek to me”. ;o)[/quote]

    Teebz, as much as you are into Hockey, I gaurantee you that if you simply start reading some of the Russian jersey’s you’d learn very, very quickly!!

    no coke, pepsi…[/quote]

    It helps when I know who the players are. But associating the Cyrillic letters to an English letter or combination of letters is where I struggle.

    I’m going to find a class. I need to learn this Russian language.

  • drwatson221b | February 3, 2009 at 2:42 pm |

    Bringhurst’s Elements actally has an entry for the backward apostrophe:

    “reversed apostrophe(s) Mutant forms of the single and double open quote. They appear in many American advertising and text faces cut in the first years of the twentieth century and in some made at the end of that century as well.”

    So, this error actually predates the computer if lead typefaces were actually cast with this mistake…

  • pk | February 3, 2009 at 2:43 pm |

    That’s the easiest part!! You have to think Russian/Ukraine!!

    Easiest example: C sounds like S and P sound like R…

    now, arange those letters together on a very famous jersey…sound them out, and BINGO! you are thinking Russian!!

  • pk | February 3, 2009 at 2:44 pm |
  • Teebz | February 3, 2009 at 2:48 pm |

    [quote comment=”313327″]http://www.icejerseys.com/images/nostalgic_collection/cccp_big.jpg[/quote]

    I’m getting it. CCCP = SSSR.

    Thanks, PK!

  • Bob from Akron | February 3, 2009 at 2:48 pm |

    Paul, nice post today!

    A few things:
    1) I agree entirely with Teebz’ (Teebz’s? Teebz’z?) comments in post #107. To me, the apostrophe is kind of a shorthand version.

    2) Skimming through the comments, I was surprised no one mentioned the San Francisco 49ers. I thought at one time, the nickname was ’49ers (’49 being short for 1849, the time of the California Gold Rush). I’ve also seen it spelled as 49’ers. (If you have seen NFL Films’ Super Bowl 19 highlight video, you’ll know what I’m talking about. Numerous shots of the Stanford Stadium scoreboard show 49’ERS…if anyone can get a screen grab, it would be appreciated!)

    3) On an episode of “Cheap Seats,” Randy and Jason Sklar point out a grammatical boo-boo during USA Network’s telecast of the California-Stanford game in 1982 (the one where the band is on the field). The Sklars make fun of a graphic that says: College Football 82′. (82 feet?)

  • Kek | February 3, 2009 at 2:52 pm |

    [quote comment=”313324″][quote comment=”313323″][quote comment=”313321″][quote comment=”313320″][quote comment=”313293″][quote comment=”313291″]
    Does that make you bi-lingual?[/quote]

    Not really. Microsoft’s language is more confusing than Cyrillic. I can make out words, but I can’t code worth a damn. I’m no programmer. LOL[/quote]

    Cyrillic is actually quite easy…there are no “silent” letters or sounds…[/quote]

    Yeah, but learning the alphabet for someone just learning? Not literally Greek, but “it’s Greek to me”. ;o)[/quote]

    Teebz, as much as you are into Hockey, I gaurantee you that if you simply start reading some of the Russian jersey’s you’d learn very, very quickly!!

    no coke, pepsi…[/quote]

    It helps when I know who the players are. But associating the Cyrillic letters to an English letter or combination of letters is where I struggle.

    I’m going to find a class. I need to learn this Russian language.[/quote]
    It’s always been a tough one for me, I know basically what’s spoken in church. Unfortunately, we’re getting away from that and doing more English, at least in the Orthodox Church in America congregations. When my dad was growing up, the entire Divine Liturgy (the analogy here would be to a Catholic Mass) was entirely in Russian.

    One of my most cherished possessions in a prayer book my father passed down to me. It was his uncle’s who ended up MIA in the Korean War.

    Aside from the sentimental value, it’s really neat because as it’s opened the left pages are in Russian with the corresponding prayers on the right page in English.

  • Namhob | February 3, 2009 at 3:00 pm |

    [quote comment=”313295″][quote comment=”313294″][quote]Does that make you bi-lingual? [/quote]

    he speaks canadian and english[/quote]

    Beauty, eh! Take off, hoser.[/quote]
    That’s what I’m talking aboot.

  • JRJR | February 3, 2009 at 3:08 pm |

    [quote comment=”313330″][quote comment=”313324″][quote comment=”313323″][quote comment=”313321″][quote comment=”313320″][quote comment=”313293″][quote comment=”313291″]
    Does that make you bi-lingual?[/quote]

    Not really. Microsoft’s language is more confusing than Cyrillic. I can make out words, but I can’t code worth a damn. I’m no programmer. LOL[/quote]

    Cyrillic is actually quite easy…there are no “silent” letters or sounds…[/quote]

    Yeah, but learning the alphabet for someone just learning? Not literally Greek, but “it’s Greek to me”. ;o)[/quote]

    Teebz, as much as you are into Hockey, I gaurantee you that if you simply start reading some of the Russian jersey’s you’d learn very, very quickly!!

    no coke, pepsi…[/quote]

    It helps when I know who the players are. But associating the Cyrillic letters to an English letter or combination of letters is where I struggle.

    I’m going to find a class. I need to learn this Russian language.[/quote]
    It’s always been a tough one for me, I know basically what’s spoken in church. Unfortunately, we’re getting away from that and doing more English, at least in the Orthodox Church in America congregations. When my dad was growing up, the entire Divine Liturgy (the analogy here would be to a Catholic Mass) was entirely in Russian.

    One of my most cherished possessions in a prayer book my father passed down to me.

    It was his uncle’s who ended up MIA in the Korean War.

    Aside from the sentimental value, it’s really neat because as it’s opened the left pages are in Russian with the corresponding prayers on the right page in English.[/quote]

    Going total non-uni(today’s theme?), but these prayer books are still available and still beautifully designed.

    https://securehost85...

    Also non uni, but great output of cleverness:

    http://niemann.blogs...

  • Patrick | February 3, 2009 at 3:16 pm |

    [quote comment=”313322″][quote comment=”313302″]As long as we’re on the subject, the use of “definately” instead of “definitely” drives me up the fucking wall.[/quote]
    Isn’t that just a misspelled word? Not really usage/punctuation issues.
    [/quote]

    Yes, the word is misspelled. Good catch.

  • Jeff | February 3, 2009 at 3:19 pm |

    (Jose Palacios sent me a really cool gift: an Astros baseball card book from 1987. It features year-by-year galleries of ’Stros cards (including the franchise’s pre-Astros years). I have that baseball card book for the Padres. I assume its from the same year. I’ll have to look for it tonight.

  • Stuby | February 3, 2009 at 3:19 pm |

    [quote comment=”313332″][quote comment=”313330″][quote comment=”313324″][quote comment=”313323″][quote comment=”313321″][quote comment=”313320″][quote comment=”313293″][quote comment=”313291″]
    Does that make you bi-lingual?[/quote]

    Not really. Microsoft’s language is more confusing than Cyrillic. I can make out words, but I can’t code worth a damn. I’m no programmer. LOL[/quote]

    Cyrillic is actually quite easy…there are no “silent” letters or sounds…[/quote]

    Yeah, but learning the alphabet for someone just learning? Not literally Greek, but “it’s Greek to me”. ;o)[/quote]

    Teebz, as much as you are into Hockey, I gaurantee you that if you simply start reading some of the Russian jersey’s you’d learn very, very quickly!!

    no coke, pepsi…[/quote]

    It helps when I know who the players are. But associating the Cyrillic letters to an English letter or combination of letters is where I struggle.

    I’m going to find a class. I need to learn this Russian language.[/quote]
    It’s always been a tough one for me, I know basically what’s spoken in church. Unfortunately, we’re getting away from that and doing more English, at least in the Orthodox Church in America congregations. When my dad was growing up, the entire Divine Liturgy (the analogy here would be to a Catholic Mass) was entirely in Russian.

    One of my most cherished possessions in a prayer book my father passed down to me.

    It was his uncle’s who ended up MIA in the Korean War.

    Aside from the sentimental value, it’s really neat because as it’s opened the left pages are in Russian with the corresponding prayers on the right page in English.[/quote]

    Going total non-uni(today’s theme?), but these prayer books are still available and still beautifully designed.

    https://securehost85...

    Also non uni, but great output of cleverness:

    http://niemann.blogs...
    That Lego thing is brilliant.

  • Steven | February 3, 2009 at 3:29 pm |

    [quote comment=”313233″]
    Here’s a related question – what’s the proper way to write the plural of an abbreviated decade? I think it should be (the ’90s). I often see this (the 90’s) and it drives me nuts but might be technically ok. It surely can’t be (the ’90’s) right? (Use of parens. just to avoid apostrophe/quote confusion.)[/quote]

    The first example is definitely correct for writing the plural of an abbreviated decade. “The 90’s” would only be technically correct if perhaps you knew something named “the 90″ and want to refer to something he owned.

    “Did you see the 90’s uniform last night?” is fine in that context.

    If this player was nicknamed “the 90s” then this would be correct: “Did you see the 90s’ uniform last night?”

    Possessive nouns; a world of fun.

  • pk | February 3, 2009 at 3:31 pm |

    How ironic is this!?!

    Citi group sues a pawn shop!! Talk about needed to go down to the pawn shop for some extra $$$

    http://money.cnn.com...

  • Paul | February 3, 2009 at 3:34 pm |

    Unlike Teebz, I do program and he is absolutely correct about computers and their applications.

  • Will L. | February 3, 2009 at 3:38 pm |

    [quote comment=”313252″][quote comment=”313248″]here it is before and after

    (those pics came courtesy of Lwiedy)[/quote]That must have stuck out like a sore thumb[/quote]

    More like a sore plum! Haha! Get it? ’cause they were wearing all purple…and plums are…

    Nevermind.

  • yt | February 3, 2009 at 3:50 pm |

    Interesting stuff on the apostrophe. It reminds me of the ongoing issue with using the ʻokina (http://en.wikipedia....) in Polynesian languages. On the computer, it’s supposed to look like a single open quote, but sometimes the apostrophe is used and it’s incorrect.

  • Adam | February 3, 2009 at 3:56 pm |

    Not uni-related, but being a proud Cincinnatian, this is something that I think this group should enjoy regarding the Missisissippi coach (UC ex-coach) Andy Kennedy…

    Kennedy also told police on the video that he had a verbal altercation about how many people could ride in the cab, and that it “makes no sense” to arrest him.

    In response to his pleas, an officer said: “You think we’ve never arrested somebody that’s made national media? … We deal with the Bengals all the time.”

  • Mark M | February 3, 2009 at 3:59 pm |

    [quote comment=”313309″][quote comment=”313297″][quote comment=”313193″]I’ve always found this apostrophe usage kind of curious…

    http://www.landsend....

    That apostrophe usage isn’t too awkward, but the ones that always look and sound bad to me are these two:
    http://www.ruthschri...
    http://www.jacklinks...

    As for the shortened version of “until”, I absolutely hate seeing it written as “till”. There was never a second L, so why add another one? An apostrophe before ’til is proper, but I simply prefer it without (til).[/quote]

    Better yet, why is a five letter word have an abbreviation? By the time you add the apostrophe, the word is only one space shorter. It is like writing “Mar” instead of “March”. Does the extra two letters really make a difference?[/quote]

    It is about poetic meter. ’til is one beat (or whatever, my wife is the poet) and until is two. I know of no logical reason to use ’til outside of a context where beats matter.

  • Jeff P | February 3, 2009 at 4:23 pm |

    [quote comment=”313282″][quote comment=”313274″]
    No, not really. Computers do exactly what the programmer tells them to do, not you.[/quote]

    Oh really? So when it comes to grammar, the programmer is to blame? Not the person typing?

    [quote comment=”313274″]When you type in many programs, the programmer has told the computer to change the apostrophe to the wrong version.[/quote]

    Fallacy – “when YOU type” means you’re agreeing that the program is correct. Which is entirely and wholly the reason why people don’t know the difference.

    [quote comment=”313274″]If he had written the word processor himself or was using notepad, it’s his problem. If not, he’s just typing and it’s a major pain to tell the correct the computer.[/quote]

    Despite that being a fairly mangled sentence, if it’s a major pain to write correctly, maybe that user shouldn’t write at all.

    Again, the problem lies with YOU. If YOU know it’s wrong, YOU‘ll change it. That’s why the alt-codes are still used by a large number of people (myself included).

    Why does everyone blame someone else? If you don’t know it’s wrong, you accept that the program is right. That kind of thought process is what allowed Madoff to blow through millions of other peoples’ monies. Do your damned homework![/quote]

    Okay, if you know it’s wrong correct it. Fine in theory, but say you’re typing a 20 page document at 80 WPM. You’re not going to catch, much less fix, every little flipped apostrophe. Period.

    And I’m sorry, but not everybody is as skilled with computers as you are. Very few people actually know what alt codes are, much less how to use them.

    And I’m not saying the computer is correct. I never did. But unless you want to turn smart quotes off- something the average user is pretty incapable of doing even if they wanted to- it’s going to make that mistake.

    It’s called a logic error. Yeah, Microsoft screwed up or just couldn’t think of a way to program it to recognize what people are doing. Either way, it’s not an error that’s significant enough to people that they’ll spend hours going back and correcting it in every report and document they write.

    In graphics, it’s not an excuse to get it wrong. But in everyday typing and usage, it is the fault of the word processor. I didn’t program word to flip my apostrophes when I don’t want them flipped. Is it my fault that it flips them and I don’t want to stop typing every time I use one and make sure it goes the right way? Not to mention if I forget a space and add one or edit the word it flips it back.

    When things are my fault I admit it. When microsoft creates a bug that screws up the entire english language as commonly written, that can be recognized too. I don’t work for Microsoft, therefore the bug is not my fault, and thus when microsoft does something that ACTIVELY CHANGES YOUR DOCUMENT TO HAVE INCORRECT GRAMMAR, it’s not my fault.

  • jaye | February 3, 2009 at 4:25 pm |

    This copy editor is in heaven today, knowing that some people still care.

  • anotherguy | February 3, 2009 at 4:46 pm |

    [quote comment=”313339″]Must have stuck out like a sore thumb.

    More like a sore plum! Haha! Get it? ’cause they were wearing all purple…and plums are…

    Nevermind.[/quote]
    Okay, anyone have a screen shot of a player in that game named “J Horner”? Kind of shorter, slighter guy… :-)

  • JRJR | February 3, 2009 at 4:47 pm |

    [quote comment=”313343″][quote comment=”313282″][quote comment=”313274″]
    No, not really. Computers do exactly what the programmer tells them to do, not you.[/quote]

    Oh really? So when it comes to grammar, the programmer is to blame? Not the person typing?

    [quote comment=”313274″]When you type in many programs, the programmer has told the computer to change the apostrophe to the wrong version.[/quote]

    Fallacy – “when YOU type” means you’re agreeing that the program is correct. Which is entirely and wholly the reason why people don’t know the difference.

    [quote comment=”313274″]If he had written the word processor himself or was using notepad, it’s his problem. If not, he’s just typing and it’s a major pain to tell the correct the computer.[/quote]

    Despite that being a fairly mangled sentence, if it’s a major pain to write correctly, maybe that user shouldn’t write at all.

    Again, the problem lies with YOU. If YOU know it’s wrong, YOU‘ll change it. That’s why the alt-codes are still used by a large number of people (myself included).

    Why does everyone blame someone else? If you don’t know it’s wrong, you accept that the program is right. That kind of thought process is what allowed Madoff to blow through millions of other peoples’ monies. Do your damned homework![/quote]

    Okay, if you know it’s wrong correct it. Fine in theory, but say you’re typing a 20 page document at 80 WPM. You’re not going to catch, much less fix, every little flipped apostrophe. Period.

    And I’m sorry, but not everybody is as skilled with computers as you are. Very few people actually know what alt codes are, much less how to use them.

    And I’m not saying the computer is correct. I never did. But unless you want to turn smart quotes off- something the average user is pretty incapable of doing even if they wanted to- it’s going to make that mistake.

    It’s called a logic error. Yeah, Microsoft screwed up or just couldn’t think of a way to program it to recognize what people are doing. Either way, it’s not an error that’s significant enough to people that they’ll spend hours going back and correcting it in every report and document they write.

    In graphics, it’s not an excuse to get it wrong. But in everyday typing and usage, it is the fault of the word processor. I didn’t program word to flip my apostrophes when I don’t want them flipped. Is it my fault that it flips them and I don’t want to stop typing every time I use one and make sure it goes the right way? Not to mention if I forget a space and add one or edit the word it flips it back.

    When things are my fault I admit it. When microsoft creates a bug that screws up the entire english language as commonly written, that can be recognized too. I don’t work for Microsoft, therefore the bug is not my fault, and thus when microsoft does something that ACTIVELY CHANGES YOUR DOCUMENT TO HAVE INCORRECT GRAMMAR, it’s not my fault.[/quote]

    I remember when I went to high school and college, and one of the things we were taught was to PROOFREAD.

  • Dane | February 3, 2009 at 4:54 pm |

    Hey, I see tonight the NY Rangers are retiring the number of that worthless, talentless, stick-swinging goon Adam Graves.

    We can now stop retiring numbers. We have reached the lowest level possible.

  • Jeff P | February 3, 2009 at 5:05 pm |

    [quote comment=”313346″][quote comment=”313343″][quote comment=”313282″][quote comment=”313274″]
    No, not really. Computers do exactly what the programmer tells them to do, not you.[/quote]

    Oh really? So when it comes to grammar, the programmer is to blame? Not the person typing?

    [quote comment=”313274″]When you type in many programs, the programmer has told the computer to change the apostrophe to the wrong version.[/quote]

    Fallacy – “when YOU type” means you’re agreeing that the program is correct. Which is entirely and wholly the reason why people don’t know the difference.

    [quote comment=”313274″]If he had written the word processor himself or was using notepad, it’s his problem. If not, he’s just typing and it’s a major pain to tell the correct the computer.[/quote]

    Despite that being a fairly mangled sentence, if it’s a major pain to write correctly, maybe that user shouldn’t write at all.

    Again, the problem lies with YOU. If YOU know it’s wrong, YOU‘ll change it. That’s why the alt-codes are still used by a large number of people (myself included).

    Why does everyone blame someone else? If you don’t know it’s wrong, you accept that the program is right. That kind of thought process is what allowed Madoff to blow through millions of other peoples’ monies. Do your damned homework![/quote]

    Okay, if you know it’s wrong correct it. Fine in theory, but say you’re typing a 20 page document at 80 WPM. You’re not going to catch, much less fix, every little flipped apostrophe. Period.

    And I’m sorry, but not everybody is as skilled with computers as you are. Very few people actually know what alt codes are, much less how to use them.

    And I’m not saying the computer is correct. I never did. But unless you want to turn smart quotes off- something the average user is pretty incapable of doing even if they wanted to- it’s going to make that mistake.

    It’s called a logic error. Yeah, Microsoft screwed up or just couldn’t think of a way to program it to recognize what people are doing. Either way, it’s not an error that’s significant enough to people that they’ll spend hours going back and correcting it in every report and document they write.

    In graphics, it’s not an excuse to get it wrong. But in everyday typing and usage, it is the fault of the word processor. I didn’t program word to flip my apostrophes when I don’t want them flipped. Is it my fault that it flips them and I don’t want to stop typing every time I use one and make sure it goes the right way? Not to mention if I forget a space and add one or edit the word it flips it back.

    When things are my fault I admit it. When microsoft creates a bug that screws up the entire english language as commonly written, that can be recognized too. I don’t work for Microsoft, therefore the bug is not my fault, and thus when microsoft does something that ACTIVELY CHANGES YOUR DOCUMENT TO HAVE INCORRECT GRAMMAR, it’s not my fault.[/quote]

    I remember when I went to high school and college, and one of the things we were taught was to PROOFREAD.[/quote]
    Did they have you proof the direction of the apostrophes?

    Honestly, use a competent program and I’ll be fine. Open Office doesn’t screw things up.

  • Jeff P | February 3, 2009 at 5:05 pm |

    That should be You’ll, not I’ll.

  • asufanwithbagoverhead | February 3, 2009 at 5:11 pm |

    re: the 1 big ben “td”

    when we first saw the replay, our whole fiesta shouted “he can’t do that!!” i don’t know if ive ever seen it called, but somehow or another, 20-odd people knew it was illeagal.

  • SWC Susan (aka Tex) | February 3, 2009 at 5:12 pm |

    [quote comment=”313321″][quote comment=”313320″][quote comment=”313293″][quote comment=”313291″]
    Does that make you bi-lingual?[/quote]

    Not really. Microsoft’s language is more confusing than Cyrillic. I can make out words, but I can’t code worth a damn. I’m no programmer. LOL[/quote]

    Cyrillic is actually quite easy…there are no “silent” letters or sounds…[/quote]

    Yeah, but learning the alphabet for someone just learning? Not literally Greek, but “it’s Greek to me”. ;o)[/quote]

    Oh yes there is…. it is called miyakiznak (sp?)… looks like a little b and is a soft sign! ;)

  • Bob | February 3, 2009 at 5:13 pm |

    It must be the economy that has Paul on edge.

    http://www.msnbc.msn...

  • SWC Susan (aka Tex) | February 3, 2009 at 5:22 pm |

    [quote comment=”313348″][quote comment=”313346″][quote comment=”313343″][quote comment=”313282″][quote comment=”313274″]
    No, not really. Computers do exactly what the programmer tells them to do, not you.[/quote]

    Oh really? So when it comes to grammar, the programmer is to blame? Not the person typing?

    [quote comment=”313274″]When you type in many programs, the programmer has told the computer to change the apostrophe to the wrong version.[/quote]

    Fallacy – “when YOU type” means you’re agreeing that the program is correct. Which is entirely and wholly the reason why people don’t know the difference.

    [quote comment=”313274″]If he had written the word processor himself or was using notepad, it’s his problem. If not, he’s just typing and it’s a major pain to tell the correct the computer.[/quote]

    Despite that being a fairly mangled sentence, if it’s a major pain to write correctly, maybe that user shouldn’t write at all.

    Again, the problem lies with YOU. If YOU know it’s wrong, YOU‘ll change it. That’s why the alt-codes are still used by a large number of people (myself included).

    Why does everyone blame someone else? If you don’t know it’s wrong, you accept that the program is right. That kind of thought process is what allowed Madoff to blow through millions of other peoples’ monies. Do your damned homework![/quote]

    Okay, if you know it’s wrong correct it. Fine in theory, but say you’re typing a 20 page document at 80 WPM. You’re not going to catch, much less fix, every little flipped apostrophe. Period.

    And I’m sorry, but not everybody is as skilled with computers as you are. Very few people actually know what alt codes are, much less how to use them.

    And I’m not saying the computer is correct. I never did. But unless you want to turn smart quotes off- something the average user is pretty incapable of doing even if they wanted to- it’s going to make that mistake.

    It’s called a logic error. Yeah, Microsoft screwed up or just couldn’t think of a way to program it to recognize what people are doing. Either way, it’s not an error that’s significant enough to people that they’ll spend hours going back and correcting it in every report and document they write.

    In graphics, it’s not an excuse to get it wrong. But in everyday typing and usage, it is the fault of the word processor. I didn’t program word to flip my apostrophes when I don’t want them flipped. Is it my fault that it flips them and I don’t want to stop typing every time I use one and make sure it goes the right way? Not to mention if I forget a space and add one or edit the word it flips it back.

    When things are my fault I admit it. When microsoft creates a bug that screws up the entire english language as commonly written, that can be recognized too. I don’t work for Microsoft, therefore the bug is not my fault, and thus when microsoft does something that ACTIVELY CHANGES YOUR DOCUMENT TO HAVE INCORRECT GRAMMAR, it’s not my fault.[/quote]

    I remember when I went to high school and college, and one of the things we were taught was to PROOFREAD.[/quote]
    Did they have you proof the direction of the apostrophes?

    Honestly, use a competent program and I’ll be fine. Open Office doesn’t screw things up.[/quote]

    When I went to school, we didn’t have computers. And the typewriter NEVER flipped my apostrophe! ;)

  • Ricko | February 3, 2009 at 5:28 pm |

    [quote comment=”313352″]It must be the economy that has Paul on edge.

    http://www.msnbc.msn...

    More like the rampant avoidance of responsibility for your own screwups or behavior. I messed up, but I’ll divert attention from it by calling you a Grammar Nazi and saying the fault is yours, that’s your too anal, too fussy.

    Can we use that with the IRS? “What’re you guys, some kinda Tax Nazis?”

    Here’s another truth. It is no longer rude to be rude. Go ahead, cut into the concession line at a ballpark. And, if someone calls you on it, give them a dirty look as if to espouse the new rule of manners, which is, “You pointed out that I was being rude? How rude.”

    That’s what constitutes rudeness these days. Not the rudeness, but not letting them get away with it.

    —Ricko

  • scott | February 3, 2009 at 5:30 pm |

    [quote comment=”313336″][quote comment=”313233″]
    Here’s a related question – what’s the proper way to write the plural of an abbreviated decade? I think it should be (the ’90s). I often see this (the 90’s) and it drives me nuts but might be technically ok. It surely can’t be (the ’90’s) right? (Use of parens. just to avoid apostrophe/quote confusion.)[/quote]

    The first example is definitely correct for writing the plural of an abbreviated decade. “The 90’s” would only be technically correct if perhaps you knew something named “the 90″ and want to refer to something he owned.

    “Did you see the 90’s uniform last night?” is fine in that context.

    If this player was nicknamed “the 90s” then this would be correct: “Did you see the 90s’ uniform last night?”

    Possessive nouns; a world of fun.[/quote]

    There was a minor league team known as the 97s a few years back:

    http://en.wikipedia....

  • JRJR | February 3, 2009 at 5:30 pm |

    [quote comment=”313353″][quote comment=”313348″][quote comment=”313346″][quote comment=”313343″][quote comment=”313282″][quote comment=”313274″]
    No, not really. Computers do exactly what the programmer tells them to do, not you.[/quote]

    Oh really? So when it comes to grammar, the programmer is to blame? Not the person typing?

    [quote comment=”313274″]When you type in many programs, the programmer has told the computer to change the apostrophe to the wrong version.[/quote]

    Fallacy – “when YOU type” means you’re agreeing that the program is correct. Which is entirely and wholly the reason why people don’t know the difference.

    [quote comment=”313274″]If he had written the word processor himself or was using notepad, it’s his problem. If not, he’s just typing and it’s a major pain to tell the correct the computer.[/quote]

    Despite that being a fairly mangled sentence, if it’s a major pain to write correctly, maybe that user shouldn’t write at all.

    Again, the problem lies with YOU. If YOU know it’s wrong, YOU‘ll change it. That’s why the alt-codes are still used by a large number of people (myself included).

    Why does everyone blame someone else? If you don’t know it’s wrong, you accept that the program is right. That kind of thought process is what allowed Madoff to blow through millions of other peoples’ monies. Do your damned homework![/quote]

    Okay, if you know it’s wrong correct it. Fine in theory, but say you’re typing a 20 page document at 80 WPM. You’re not going to catch, much less fix, every little flipped apostrophe. Period.

    And I’m sorry, but not everybody is as skilled with computers as you are. Very few people actually know what alt codes are, much less how to use them.

    And I’m not saying the computer is correct. I never did. But unless you want to turn smart quotes off- something the average user is pretty incapable of doing even if they wanted to- it’s going to make that mistake.

    It’s called a logic error. Yeah, Microsoft screwed up or just couldn’t think of a way to program it to recognize what people are doing. Either way, it’s not an error that’s significant enough to people that they’ll spend hours going back and correcting it in every report and document they write.

    In graphics, it’s not an excuse to get it wrong. But in everyday typing and usage, it is the fault of the word processor. I didn’t program word to flip my apostrophes when I don’t want them flipped. Is it my fault that it flips them and I don’t want to stop typing every time I use one and make sure it goes the right way? Not to mention if I forget a space and add one or edit the word it flips it back.

    When things are my fault I admit it. When microsoft creates a bug that screws up the entire english language as commonly written, that can be recognized too. I don’t work for Microsoft, therefore the bug is not my fault, and thus when microsoft does something that ACTIVELY CHANGES YOUR DOCUMENT TO HAVE INCORRECT GRAMMAR, it’s not my fault.[/quote]

    I remember when I went to high school and college, and one of the things we were taught was to PROOFREAD.[/quote]
    Did they have you proof the direction of the apostrophes?

    Honestly, use a competent program and I’ll be fine. Open Office doesn’t screw things up.[/quote]

    When I went to school, we didn’t have computers. And the typewriter NEVER flipped my apostrophe! ;)[/quote]

    And I bet you were held responsible for the work you produced. Computer, typewriter or other wise. All hail the typewriter!

  • Giancarlo | February 3, 2009 at 5:30 pm |

    [quote comment=”313297″]
    As for the shortened version of “until”, I absolutely hate seeing it written as “till”. There was never a second L, so why add another one? An apostrophe before ’til is proper, but I simply prefer it without (til).[/quote]
    “Till” is not a mistake, nor is it an abbreviation of “until.” Till is a different word that is actually older (before 12th Century, i.e. Old English, according to Merriam-Webster) than until (13th Century, i.e. Middle English). Admittedly it is confusing that they have the same meaning, but if anything “until” was a sort of redundant form of till, originally.

  • rjwaynick | February 3, 2009 at 5:42 pm |

    I have the same Surf book of the Detroit Tigers from the early 90’s…Was a handy checklist when using ebay to collect the 1968 detroit tigers baseball card set.

  • James Craven | February 3, 2009 at 5:44 pm |

    [quote comment=”313337″]“Citi group sues a pawn shop!! Talk about needed to go down to the pawn shop for some extra $$$.”[/quote]

    Ssssssssh! Don’t give the mets any ideas.

  • LI Phil | February 3, 2009 at 6:03 pm |

    [quote]I’ll divert attention from it by calling you a Grammar Nazi and saying the fault is yours, that’s that your you’re too anal, too fussy.[/quote]

    (fixed)

    .

    :D

  • Ricko | February 3, 2009 at 6:13 pm |

    [quote comment=”313360″][quote]I’ll divert attention from it by calling you a Grammar Nazi and saying the fault is yours, that’s that your you’re too anal, too fussy.[/quote]

    (fixed)

    .

    :D[/quote]

    hee hee hee

  • Vincent | February 3, 2009 at 6:15 pm |

    [quote comment=”313296″][quote comment=”313295″][quote comment=”313294″][quote]Does that make you bi-lingual? [/quote]

    he speaks canadian and english[/quote]

    Beauty, eh! Take off, hoser.[/quote]

    Weird, that didn’t work.

    Beauty, eh! Take off, hoser. – Canadian
    Nice one! Leave me alone. – English
    Ferme-la! Tabarnacle. – French

    Tri-lingual? LOL[/quote]
    Since we are correcting each other today…
    Teebz, if it is used as a curse word it is tabarnak. ;)

  • Patrick in MI | February 3, 2009 at 6:19 pm |

    Geez Paul, you need to punch a koala and get it of your system. I’ll be back on Saturday when we actually discuss uniforms.

  • Teebz | February 3, 2009 at 7:10 pm |

    [quote comment=”313362″][quote comment=”313296″][quote comment=”313295″][quote comment=”313294″][quote]Does that make you bi-lingual? [/quote]

    he speaks canadian and english[/quote]

    Beauty, eh! Take off, hoser.[/quote]

    Weird, that didn’t work.

    Beauty, eh! Take off, hoser. – Canadian
    Nice one! Leave me alone. – English
    Ferme-la! Tabarnacle. – French

    Tri-lingual? LOL[/quote]
    Since we are correcting each other today…
    Teebz, if it is used as a curse word it is tabarnak. ;)[/quote]

    I was never taught the spelling of cuss words in school. Thanks, Vincent! ;o)

  • jon | February 3, 2009 at 7:14 pm |

    [quote comment=”313356″][quote comment=”313353″][quote comment=”313348″][quote comment=”313346″][quote comment=”313343″][quote comment=”313282″][quote comment=”313274″]
    No, not really. Computers do exactly what the programmer tells them to do, not you.[/quote]

    Oh really? So when it comes to grammar, the programmer is to blame? Not the person typing?

    [quote comment=”313274″]When you type in many programs, the programmer has told the computer to change the apostrophe to the wrong version.[/quote]

    Fallacy – “when YOU type” means you’re agreeing that the program is correct. Which is entirely and wholly the reason why people don’t know the difference.

    [quote comment=”313274″]If he had written the word processor himself or was using notepad, it’s his problem. If not, he’s just typing and it’s a major pain to tell the correct the computer.[/quote]

    Despite that being a fairly mangled sentence, if it’s a major pain to write correctly, maybe that user shouldn’t write at all.

    Again, the problem lies with YOU. If YOU know it’s wrong, YOU‘ll change it. That’s why the alt-codes are still used by a large number of people (myself included).

    Why does everyone blame someone else? If you don’t know it’s wrong, you accept that the program is right. That kind of thought process is what allowed Madoff to blow through millions of other peoples’ monies. Do your damned homework![/quote]

    Okay, if you know it’s wrong correct it. Fine in theory, but say you’re typing a 20 page document at 80 WPM. You’re not going to catch, much less fix, every little flipped apostrophe. Period.

    And I’m sorry, but not everybody is as skilled with computers as you are. Very few people actually know what alt codes are, much less how to use them.

    And I’m not saying the computer is correct. I never did. But unless you want to turn smart quotes off- something the average user is pretty incapable of doing even if they wanted to- it’s going to make that mistake.

    It’s called a logic error. Yeah, Microsoft screwed up or just couldn’t think of a way to program it to recognize what people are doing. Either way, it’s not an error that’s significant enough to people that they’ll spend hours going back and correcting it in every report and document they write.

    In graphics, it’s not an excuse to get it wrong. But in everyday typing and usage, it is the fault of the word processor. I didn’t program word to flip my apostrophes when I don’t want them flipped. Is it my fault that it flips them and I don’t want to stop typing every time I use one and make sure it goes the right way? Not to mention if I forget a space and add one or edit the word it flips it back.

    When things are my fault I admit it. When microsoft creates a bug that screws up the entire english language as commonly written, that can be recognized too. I don’t work for Microsoft, therefore the bug is not my fault, and thus when microsoft does something that ACTIVELY CHANGES YOUR DOCUMENT TO HAVE INCORRECT GRAMMAR, it’s not my fault.[/quote]

    I remember when I went to high school and college, and one of the things we were taught was to PROOFREAD.[/quote]
    Did they have you proof the direction of the apostrophes?

    Honestly, use a competent program and I’ll be fine. Open Office doesn’t screw things up.[/quote]

    When I went to school, we didn’t have computers. And the typewriter NEVER flipped my apostrophe! ;)[/quote]

    And I bet you were held responsible for the work you produced. Computer, typewriter or other wise. All hail the typewriter![/quote]

    i’m sorry but i’m not gonna spend four hours going over my fifteen page term paper looking at apostrophes. thats just stupid. no professor is ever gonna mark me off because my apostrophes are backwards. so i don’t care. there are like three jobs in the world that would refuse someone whose resume had backwards apostrophes. in design, i can understand the argument. in a term paper, no. i’ve been typing (on a computer) since i was six and i don’t know what the hell an alt code is, i’ve never used one, and i don’t plan on using one soon. especially over something as trivial as an apostrophe. now can we please talk about uniforms?

  • Matt | February 3, 2009 at 7:22 pm |

    Isn’t this for people to try on new uniforms?

    http://sports.yahoo....

  • Teebz | February 3, 2009 at 7:23 pm |

    [quote comment=”313365″]
    i’m sorry but i’m not gonna spend four hours going over my fifteen page term paper looking at apostrophes. thats just stupid. no professor is ever gonna mark me off because my apostrophes are backwards. so i don’t care. there are like three jobs in the world that would refuse someone whose resume had backwards apostrophes. in design, i can understand the argument. in a term paper, no. i’ve been typing (on a computer) since i was six and i don’t know what the hell an alt code is, i’ve never used one, and i don’t plan on using one soon. especially over something as trivial as an apostrophe. now can we please talk about uniforms?[/quote]

    You want this site bookmarked right under UniWatch. Then again, you may want this page bookmarked for the next term paper you write.

  • Matt | February 3, 2009 at 7:24 pm |

    Sorry, that last post was supposed to be Oliver Perez trying on his “new” Mets jersey.

  • Teebz | February 3, 2009 at 7:28 pm |
  • Dane | February 3, 2009 at 7:32 pm |

    Blue Jackets wearing white at home tonight, allowing the visiting Blues to wear their “arch” jersey.

  • jon | February 3, 2009 at 7:42 pm |

    [quote comment=”313367″][quote comment=”313365″]
    i’m sorry but i’m not gonna spend four hours going over my fifteen page term paper looking at apostrophes. thats just stupid. no professor is ever gonna mark me off because my apostrophes are backwards. so i don’t care. there are like three jobs in the world that would refuse someone whose resume had backwards apostrophes. in design, i can understand the argument. in a term paper, no. i’ve been typing (on a computer) since i was six and i don’t know what the hell an alt code is, i’ve never used one, and i don’t plan on using one soon. especially over something as trivial as an apostrophe. now can we please talk about uniforms?[/quote]

    You want this site bookmarked right under UniWatch. Then again, you may want this page bookmarked for the next term paper you write.[/quote]

    thats not what i meant. i know how to use them… i just don’t really care if it looks like an open quote or if it looks like how an apostrophe is actually supposed to look… especially if ms word has it wrong and would thus make me type in a code for it to be right. sorry, don’t care enough to waste time doing that.

  • bob | February 3, 2009 at 7:47 pm |

    [quote comment=”313343″][quote comment=”313282″][quote comment=”313274″]
    No, not really. Computers do exactly what the programmer tells them to do, not you.[/quote]

    Oh really? So when it comes to grammar, the programmer is to blame? Not the person typing?

    [quote comment=”313274″]When you type in many programs, the programmer has told the computer to change the apostrophe to the wrong version.[/quote]

    Fallacy – “when YOU type” means you’re agreeing that the program is correct. Which is entirely and wholly the reason why people don’t know the difference.

    [quote comment=”313274″]If he had written the word processor himself or was using notepad, it’s his problem. If not, he’s just typing and it’s a major pain to tell the correct the computer.[/quote]

    Despite that being a fairly mangled sentence, if it’s a major pain to write correctly, maybe that user shouldn’t write at all.

    Again, the problem lies with YOU. If YOU know it’s wrong, YOU‘ll change it. That’s why the alt-codes are still used by a large number of people (myself included).

    Why does everyone blame someone else? If you don’t know it’s wrong, you accept that the program is right. That kind of thought process is what allowed Madoff to blow through millions of other peoples’ monies. Do your damned homework![/quote]

    Okay, if you know it’s wrong correct it. Fine in theory, but say you’re typing a 20 page document at 80 WPM. You’re not going to catch, much less fix, every little flipped apostrophe. Period.

    And I’m sorry, but not everybody is as skilled with computers as you are. Very few people actually know what alt codes are, much less how to use them.

    And I’m not saying the computer is correct. I never did. But unless you want to turn smart quotes off- something the average user is pretty incapable of doing even if they wanted to- it’s going to make that mistake.

    It’s called a logic error. Yeah, Microsoft screwed up or just couldn’t think of a way to program it to recognize what people are doing. Either way, it’s not an error that’s significant enough to people that they’ll spend hours going back and correcting it in every report and document they write.

    In graphics, it’s not an excuse to get it wrong. But in everyday typing and usage, it is the fault of the word processor. I didn’t program word to flip my apostrophes when I don’t want them flipped. Is it my fault that it flips them and I don’t want to stop typing every time I use one and make sure it goes the right way? Not to mention if I forget a space and add one or edit the word it flips it back.

    When things are my fault I admit it. When microsoft creates a bug that screws up the entire english language as commonly written, that can be recognized too. I don’t work for Microsoft, therefore the bug is not my fault, and thus when microsoft does something that ACTIVELY CHANGES YOUR DOCUMENT TO HAVE INCORRECT GRAMMAR, it’s not my fault.[/quote]

    It’s a design issue. Sure the program is working exactly as specified, but has the program been designed in a user-centric fashion? Perhaps it is a design flaw that the application is automatically ‘correcting’ my work without adequately informing me. A little user centered design goes a long way. Ask Steve Jobs.

  • JK | February 3, 2009 at 7:56 pm |

    Orioles O’s hats have the same apostrophe issue:

    http://mlb.imageg.ne...

  • Ricko | February 3, 2009 at 8:22 pm |

    Home a bit later than I thought, but here are the Pete Maravich photos I promised, showing that he didn’t wear floppy striped socks but rather just the athletic socks. They aren’t as dirty as they look, either. LOL Most times, the actual color was a light gray.

    In his first Hawks uni. These are the whites, but the color scheme was Air Force Blue with red and white trim, wearing #19, before he switched to #44…
    http://farm4.static....
    Next, the royal uni of the three-uni set (royal, lime, white)…
    http://farm4.static....
    Then to red and white…
    http://farm4.static....
    and with the Jazz…
    http://farm4.static....

    —Ricko

  • Ricko | February 3, 2009 at 8:32 pm |

    More Maravich….

    in the Hawks’ lime green…
    http://farm4.static....
    and with Jazz wearing #7…and no floppies…
    http://farm4.static....

    Don’t have anyting of him with Celtics (#44 there).

    —Ricko

  • subway | February 3, 2009 at 8:44 pm |

    [quote comment=”313347″]Hey, I see tonight the NY Rangers are retiring the number of that worthless, talentless, stick-swinging goon Adam Graves.

    We can now stop retiring numbers. We have reached the lowest level possible.[/quote]

    You must be a Penguins fan who only remembers one incident in the 92 playoffs to post something so ignorant.

  • spindar@mac.com | February 3, 2009 at 8:44 pm |

    nice photo of Pistol Pete’s son,,but I recall that Pete wore Keds low cut black in those days

  • Ricko | February 3, 2009 at 9:31 pm |

    [quote comment=”313377″]nice photo of Pistol Pete’s son,,but I recall that Pete wore Keds low cut black in those days[/quote]

    Yup, at LSU…
    http://farm4.static....
    and, even those these have three stripes, they are Pro Keds…
    http://farm4.static....
    You can see the little red and blue stripes on the sole edge near the toe (although he did briefly wear adidas when he first joined the Hawks)….
    http://farm4.static....

    —Ricko

  • Ricko | February 3, 2009 at 9:37 pm |

    A note on those three-stripe ProKeds. Very, very soon (certainly by the next season) they had only two stripes. Don’t know if that was the result of adidas legal action or ProKeds’ idea of making sure their shoes were recognizable, but one of the stripes did disappear.

    —ProKeds

  • Ian | February 3, 2009 at 10:11 pm |

    Current Rangers players wore white sweaters with a #9 where the C or A should be, but switched to blue for the game.

    Nice surprise to see JD there!

  • Luke | February 3, 2009 at 10:15 pm |

    Something that has bothered me since the whole “recession” talk started is the ridiculousness of the Manny Ramirez contract offers.

    We’re talking about one man who has turned down a $25 million offer from the Dodgers to show up for work for approximately 200 days.

    While I’m not suggesting the boycott of MLB, it might be time to let Manny be Manny at home while he and his agent realize that I won’t make $25 million in showing up for work for 200 years.

    Sure, he’s got Hall of Fame numbers, but rejecting $25 million for one season? What the crap?

    Because he feels he is worth $26 million, and in the fairness of other MLB players he shouldn’t take anything less than he’s worth. (that would drive their contracts down). Look at how upset the NHLPA was when Crosby only took $8.7 mil a year, when his market valeu was probably around $12 mil.

    I’m not saying I enjoy high salaries, but we’re the ones who watch and support the sponsors that have funded such lavish contracts.

  • Jeff | February 3, 2009 at 10:26 pm |

    [quote comment=”313344″]This copy editor is in heaven today, knowing that some people still care.[/quote]
    Amen to that. Apostrophe? Exclamation point!

    Applause. Period.

  • mtjaws | February 3, 2009 at 10:28 pm |

    [quote comment=”313378″]
    —Ricko[/quote]

    Great edition of “Benchies” today!

  • Carl | February 3, 2009 at 10:30 pm |

    [quote comment=”313282″][quote comment=”313274″]
    No, not really. Computers do exactly what the programmer tells them to do, not you.[/quote]

    Oh really? So when it comes to grammar, the programmer is to blame? Not the person typing?

    [quote comment=”313274″]When you type in many programs, the programmer has told the computer to change the apostrophe to the wrong version.[/quote]

    Fallacy – “when YOU type” means you’re agreeing that the program is correct. Which is entirely and wholly the reason why people don’t know the difference.

    [quote comment=”313274″]If he had written the word processor himself or was using notepad, it’s his problem. If not, he’s just typing and it’s a major pain to tell the correct the computer.[/quote]

    Despite that being a fairly mangled sentence, if it’s a major pain to write correctly, maybe that user shouldn’t write at all.

    Again, the problem lies with YOU. If YOU know it’s wrong, YOU‘ll change it. That’s why the alt-codes are still used by a large number of people (myself included).

    Why does everyone blame someone else? If you don’t know it’s wrong, you accept that the program is right. That kind of thought process is what allowed Madoff to blow through millions of other peoples’ monies. Do your damned homework![/quote]

    teebz, I’m with you on this. It is downright amazing to know how low expectations of personal responsibility have dropped to. So many people trust that the computer must be right. It seems that the apostrophe catastrophe is just one more losing battle for language. People assume that the spell check is right. They assume that the grammar correction is leading them in the correct direction. I can’t tell you how many times I get a letter or resume on my desk with a spelling error and can’t get past it.

    For all those who think otherwise, allow me to provide an example. Engineers are charged with designing complex buildings. Often they use software developed by someone else to analyze their buildings. The even use them to aid in the design of them. If the building falls down, do people blame the software company? No. It’s the personal responsibility of the engineer to design the building regardless of the tools used.

    I must laugh, however, at the HTML-induced apostrophe in the post (and myriad places elsewhere today). It’s a tough battle and I’m not one to live in a glass house. I do have a sense of humor, though.

  • Carl | February 3, 2009 at 10:54 pm |

    [quote comment=”313373″]Orioles O’s hats have the same apostrophe issue:

    http://mlb.imageg.ne...

    Now that’s just bad. Never noticed that before. I’m ashamed to own one. If anyone needs me I’ll be in the penalty box. Feeling shame.

  • Crafton | February 3, 2009 at 11:01 pm |

    There’s something about the spring training page header that bothers me more than the apostrophe. It could just be me reading too much into the picture, but shouldn’t the MLB “postmark” be on the right side? I keep trying to focus on the apostrophe, but my mind is much more intent on moving that red blotch to the other side of text.

  • Vincent | February 3, 2009 at 11:32 pm |

    A little snafu with a NOB tonight in Ottawa.

    Right winger Brad Richardson (#15) of the LA Kings spend the first two periods with Richarson on his back but came back in the third with the missing d to properly form Richardson.

    (sorry, i tried but didn’t found any pic)

  • Teebz | February 4, 2009 at 12:27 am |

    [quote comment=”313381″]Something that has bothered me since the whole “recession” talk started is the ridiculousness of the Manny Ramirez contract offers.

    We’re talking about one man who has turned down a $25 million offer from the Dodgers to show up for work for approximately 200 days.

    While I’m not suggesting the boycott of MLB, it might be time to let Manny be Manny at home while he and his agent realize that I won’t make $25 million in showing up for work for 200 years.

    Sure, he’s got Hall of Fame numbers, but rejecting $25 million for one season? What the crap?

    Because he feels he is worth $26 million, and in the fairness of other MLB players he shouldn’t take anything less than he’s worth. (that would drive their contracts down). Look at how upset the NHLPA was when Crosby only took $8.7 mil a year, when his market valeu was probably around $12 mil.

    I’m not saying I enjoy high salaries, but we’re the ones who watch and support the sponsors that have funded such lavish contracts.[/quote]

    It’s that kind of argument that will kill you.

    The MLBPA bitches and complains about collusion when the owners are trying to spend wisely, and yet Ramirez has the nerve to reject more money than anyone on this board will see in his/her lifetime.

    I’m not supporting the Dodgers in any way since I am as far away from La-La-Land as possible, so I have nothing to do with them offering him $25 million. However, if you want to feel the wrath that Yankees fans feel, you go right ahead and pump more money into Dodgerville.

    He isn’t worth $25 million in any era. If you think he is, you and Scott Boras probably have been smoking the same schwag.

  • Luke | February 4, 2009 at 1:34 am |

    [quote comment=”313389″][quote comment=”313381″]Something that has bothered me since the whole “recession” talk started is the ridiculousness of the Manny Ramirez contract offers.

    We’re talking about one man who has turned down a $25 million offer from the Dodgers to show up for work for approximately 200 days.

    Whoa, I didn’t say he was worth it. I’m just saying he should take what he’s worth.

    The MLB’s salary system is fucked up, no question. And I think this recession is going to hit the MLB hard (a night at the ballpark is an EASY expense to slash) Hopefully it’s enough for them to make some changes, otherwise Pirate fans like myself and other teams alike will have nothing but Spring Training dreams.
    While I’m not suggesting the boycott of MLB, it might be time to let Manny be Manny at home while he and his agent realize that I won’t make $25 million in showing up for work for 200 years.

    Sure, he’s got Hall of Fame numbers, but rejecting $25 million for one season? What the crap?

    Because he feels he is worth $26 million, and in the fairness of other MLB players he shouldn’t take anything less than he’s worth. (that would drive their contracts down). Look at how upset the NHLPA was when Crosby only took $8.7 mil a year, when his market valeu was probably around $12 mil.

    I’m not saying I enjoy high salaries, but we’re the ones who watch and support the sponsors that have funded such lavish contracts.[/quote]

    It’s that kind of argument that will kill you.

    The MLBPA bitches and complains about collusion when the owners are trying to spend wisely, and yet Ramirez has the nerve to reject more money than anyone on this board will see in his/her lifetime.

    I’m not supporting the Dodgers in any way since I am as far away from La-La-Land as possible, so I have nothing to do with them offering him $25 million. However, if you want to feel the wrath that Yankees fans feel, you go right ahead and pump more money into Dodgerville.

    He isn’t worth $25 million in any era. If you think he is, you and Scott Boras probably have been smoking the same schwag.[/quote]

  • Luke | February 4, 2009 at 1:34 am |

    Whoa, I didn’t say he was worth it. I’m just saying he should take what he’s worth.

    The MLB’s salary system is fucked up, no question. And I think this recession is going to hit the MLB hard (a night at the ballpark is an EASY expense to slash) Hopefully it’s enough for them to make some changes, otherwise Pirate fans like myself and other teams alike will have nothing but Spring Training dreams.

    (I messed up my last comment)

  • Marcus Ramsey | February 4, 2009 at 2:18 am |

    Thank you for the post today Paul. The “Make ’Em Laugh” documentary was on PBS recently and Chris Rock said something to the effect of “If ignorance is bliss, then noticing every small detail of life is hell.” This post reminded me of that.

  • AB | February 4, 2009 at 2:34 am |

    [quote comment=”313329″]On an episode of “Cheap Seats,” Randy and Jason Sklar point out a grammatical boo-boo during USA Network’s telecast of the California-Stanford game in 1982 (the one where the band is on the field). The Sklars make fun of a graphic that says: College Football 82′. (82 feet?)[/quote]

    This bothers me even more than Paul’s original gripe, though that is also an excellent observation! It seems to be popping up more frequently, as well. At least the backwards apostrophe is somewhat justifiable. This is just completely out of place.

  • LI Matt | February 4, 2009 at 6:14 am |

    [quote comment=”313347″]Hey, I see tonight the NY Rangers are retiring the number of that worthless, talentless, stick-swinging goon hard-working, 50-goal-scoring, Stanley Cup-winning fan favorite Adam Graves.[/quote]

    Fixed.