Curling Irony

Docell.jpg

New ESPN column today — here’s the link.

Meanwhile: One of the highlights of my recent trip to San Francisco was seeing my good friends and Uni Watch ukulele masters Christine and Greg Freeman (shown here flanking the equally estimable Mr. Tim Cook), who are two of the best people I’ve ever had the pleasure of knowing. At one point while we were hanging out, Christine asked, “So have you written yet about Dock Ellis wearing hair curlers?”

Adopting the tone of a sage elder dealing with an enthusiastic but inexperienced youth, I patiently explained to Christine that Dock Ellis was the guy who tossed a no-hitter while tripping on acid, not the guy who wore curlers. “In fact,” I concluded, full of the wisdom and intelligence that come with years on the uni beat, “I’m not aware of any big league player who’s worn curlers. But whoever you’re thinking of, it certainly wasn’t Dock Ellis.” Somehow resisting the urge to give her an understanding pat on the head, I sat back in my chair and smiled, secure in the knowledge that another misconception had been set aright.

Two days later I awoke to the following e-mail from Christine: “I couldn’t wait to finish work today so I could find you a picture of Dock Ellis in curlers. But there’s more — he gave the Baseball Reliquary his curlers. Turns out he didn’t wear them in games, just in pregame warm-ups.”

Well, dang — I sure missed the boat on this one. Christine, to her credit, was too polite to say, “I told you so” (or, perhaps more appropriately, “Boy, Paul, could you possibly have been more of a condescending jerk?”). Not only that, but she graciously offered to transcribe the curlers-centric portion of Ellis’s biography, Dock Ellis in the Country of Baseball — an offer I readily accepted.

The book, which is still available (see link at right), was written by Donald Hall and published in 1976, when Ellis was still pitching in the majors. Here’s the part that concerns us:

[1973] was also the year of the curlers. Dock has always paid as much attention to his hair as to his clothes. When he was in high school his Quo Vadis haircut earned him the nickname of Peanut, soon shortened to Nut. He has straightened his hair, cornrolled his hair, plaited his hair, let his hair grow out to a bushy Afro, and clipped it tight. He has even shaved his head. Ebony ran a feature on Dock’s various hair-styles.

So when he started wearing curlers to the ball park, in 1973, Dock-watchers should not have been surprised. In August of that year, someone photographed Dock hanging around the bullpen, before the game, with a special size nine baseball cap over his curlers, but with curlers clearly visible beside his ears.

Dock wore them only during practice. Yet word came down, from on high, that when he wore curlers he was “out of uniform.” He was to cease and desist.

He did, but not before he spoke his mind. “I know the orders came from [MLB commissioner] Bowie Kuhn,” Dock told [NL president] Charlie Feeney. “I don’t like it.” Look around. There are fellows who wear white shoes in practice. Some wear jackets. Others don’t wear hats. I wasn’t going to say anything, but since they seem to be aiming in my direction, I’m going to say things.

“Only a few years ago, ballplayers weren’t allowed to wear mustaches or goatees, long hair or sideburns. Now all that is okay. Baseball caught up with the times. Now they’re getting behind again There are many black men who wear curlers to help their hair. I didn’t hear anybody put out any orders about Joe Pepitone when he wore a hairpiece that went down to his shoulders.”

I find myself curious about the curlers, as if there were more to the story than meets the eye. For one thing, although I spend a good deal of time with Dock, I never see him wearing curlers around the house. I wonder why he wore them just before games. I ask him.

“That’s when I was throwing spitballs. When I had the curlers, my hair would be straight. Down the back. On the ends would be nothing but balls of sweat.”

“Spitballs!” I say. That was one pitch Dock hadn’t told me about. “So you wore curlers for the sake of pitching?”

“Oh yes! Just one touch at a time. It was something I experimented with. I do well with them.”

So there you have it. Anyone know of any other athletes who’ve worn curlers on the field (even if only during pregame warm-ups)?

Research Request: Yesterday’s comments included a report that Peyton Manning changed his Super Bowl uniform during halftime, for luck. I know of several other examples of uni-related superstitions (Joe Montana wearing the same jersey in Super Bowl XXIII that he’d worn in Super Bowl XIX; a team sticking with a particular uni design during a winning streak; rally caps; etc.), but I’m looking for more. Know of any? Do tell.

Just to clarify, I’m not looking for something like Wayne Gretzky hiking up one side of his jersey hem, or John Franco honoring his father by wearing a New York Sanitation Dept. T-shirt — those are signature styles, but they’re not superstitions per se. I’m looking for things specifically done for luck, or to break a streak of bad luck, or for some similar reason. OK? OK. Big thanks in advance for any and all suggestions.

Uni Watch News Ticker: The Hornets and Sixers both wore their new red uniforms last night. … I’ve written in the past about Cowboys who’ve tied down their jerseys to their shoulder pads, thanks to a little reinforced eyelet patch that’s added to the jerseys (some ex-Cowboys do this, too). Now Nicholas Hernandez has provided the best views yet of how this is done. He writes: “The auction house I work for recently got a shipment of game-worn Cowboys unis, and sure enough, several of them had the alteration done to them. It’s just a small piece of tackle twill with a hole punched in it [here's a closer view]. The player has the option of punching it through to the jersey. All it does is prohibit the jersey from continuing to tear once the hole is made. Terry Glenn’s is unpunched [front, back]. And here’s a shot of Demarcus Ware’s gamer with the knot of the shoelace still attached.” … Manny Delcarmen and Jon Lester of the Red Sox are changing their numbers, reports Alec Long. Delcarmen’s switching from 57 to 17, and Lester from 62 to 31. … Faaaaaascinating note from Jared Hartung of the Arizona Daily News-Sun: “I was talking to the Texas Rangers’ equipment manager about the new BP jerseys and he said that it’s been a hassle getting used to the new material. He said that he and fellow equipment managers have to learn how to use a heat press again because the jersey tops can’t handle the heavy numbers and stitching it takes to apply them. ‘It’s been years since any of us have used a heat press,’ he said. ‘It’s going to take some time to get used to.’ ” I can hear Joe Hilseberg laughing all the way from Baltimore. … NHL players usually write their uni number on the tape at the top of their sticks, but Alex Ovechkin, who wears No. 8, has been turning his 8s into little illustrations. There’s a mention of it here, which led to a fuller treatment of it here (with thanks to Kim Kolb). … Reprinted from yesterday’s comments: The Cubs are going to put Under Armour ads on Wrigley Field’s outfield doors. … “There are some pics floating around of the upcoming George Clooney movie Leatherheads,” writes Mike Fiala. “I love the striped jersey, although the hosiery really lacks something.”

 

187 comments to Curling Irony

  • Chris Hilf | February 15, 2007 at 9:01 am |

    For the streak-thing – The Steelers wore white during the super bowl last year, even though they were the designated ‘home’ team. They had come into the playoffs as a 6-seed and won three games in a row in their white uniforms, so they stuck with them instead of wearing black.

  • Matt | February 15, 2007 at 9:06 am |

    Turk Wendell used to wear a bear tooth necklace for good luck… He had many, many other superstitions too…

  • Mark in Shiga | February 15, 2007 at 9:20 am |

    Manny Delcarmen and Jon Lester of the Red Sox are changing their numbers, reports Alec Long. Delcarmen’s switching from 57 to 17, and Lester from 62 to 31.

    This is good to hear. All those ridiculously high numbers on the Red Sox last season made them look like a spring training split squad.

  • lockbull | February 15, 2007 at 9:23 am |

    Not sure if this qualifies, but George Foreman wore the same trunks when he lost to Ali and then 20 years (and a few pants sizes) later when he beat Michael Moorer.

  • Matt D. | February 15, 2007 at 9:24 am |

    in 1993, the Blue Jays abandoned their white-front home caps for their all-blue caps during a losing streak.
    There’s the hockey tradition of ‘Playoff Beards’, too…

  • Mike B | February 15, 2007 at 9:26 am |

    In August 1997, Jim Thome’s Cleveland Indians teammates honored him on his birthday by collectively sporting his signature high socks. After a big 10-4 win, many of the players continued superstitiously wearing the high socks. They kept it up right on through the playoffs into the World Series, which they eventually lost to the Marlins.

  • WVU Tom | February 15, 2007 at 9:26 am |

    Can’t believe I missed yesterdays discussion regarding the WVU unis!

    I guess they’re not too bad, although I kinda like the current ones, as long as the blue jersey wasn’t being worn at the same time as the blue pants.

    I just hope that the gold alternate uni is nothing more than a brainstorming idea that never sees the light of day, however. I would always find myself recoiling in horror watching highlights of Cal when they wore their yellow alternates.

    (Plus, getting rid of the metallic sheen on the helmets should be a priority as well!)

  • NickNH | February 15, 2007 at 9:30 am |

    that third Ovie stick looks like he drew some naughty bits between the legs.

    Third leg indeed.

  • wooster, oh | February 15, 2007 at 9:33 am |

    [quote comment="55152"]that third Ovie stick looks like he drew some naughty bits between the legs.

    Third leg indeed.[/quote]

    Beat me to it.

  • Pittsburgh Gunny | February 15, 2007 at 9:37 am |

    [quote comment="55152"]that third Ovie stick looks like he drew some naughty bits between the legs.

    Third leg indeed.[/quote]
    And beat me as well, HA, great minds and all that I suppose.

  • Nathan | February 15, 2007 at 9:37 am |

    Re: UA ads and the Cubs. I love how the press release says Wrigley will “feature” the ads, as if people will come to the ballpark just to see the new cool UnderArmor billboards.

  • NickNH | February 15, 2007 at 9:41 am |

    [quote comment="55156"][quote comment="55152"]that third Ovie stick looks like he drew some naughty bits between the legs.

    Third leg indeed.[/quote]
    And beat me as well, HA, great minds and all that I suppose.[/quote]

    Great dirty minds certainly think alike, hahaha.

  • Luther Mahoney | February 15, 2007 at 9:43 am |

    The Raptors wore red jerseys,for their home
    game,as well,last night.

  • Mariel S | February 15, 2007 at 9:49 am |

    When Chase Utley was in the middle of his hit streak last year he didn’t talk to reporters at all about it and instead talked about the weather or who the Phillies starting pitcher was. After it was over, he mentioned that during the streak he didn’t wear the same shirt for five weeks, and he kept the same shoes he had when he began his 35-game hitting streak on June 21.

  • Pittsburgh Gunny | February 15, 2007 at 9:49 am |

    Another annoying example of logo creep here, although a new culprit is this case which happens to be Hollister.

  • Mariel S | February 15, 2007 at 9:53 am |

    link to the article written after Utley’s hit streak was over.

  • Mariel S | February 15, 2007 at 9:53 am |
  • dgc | February 15, 2007 at 9:55 am |

    [quote comment="55161"]Another annoying example of logo creep here, although a new culprit is this case which happens to be Hollister.[/quote]

    That looks like a different picture of the guy mentioned here: link

    The guy is really a Caps fan. He just likes to wear jerseys of his favorite players.

  • Kim | February 15, 2007 at 9:55 am |

    There was a Manchester United game a while back (must be over 10 years now) where they came out in some alternate uniforms (grey) against Southhampton, got their buts kicked all over the field (3-0), went in at halftime, changed to a different alternate uniform (blue and white) and lost 3-1.

    Wiki Link here.

  • Stuby | February 15, 2007 at 9:55 am |

    Great to see Candlestick Park’s old chainlink fence in the background of the Dock Ellis baseball card.

  • Peter Wunsch | February 15, 2007 at 10:02 am |

    In Super Bowl XII, Denver was the home team and was undecided between wearing the Orange Crush jerseys or wearing white to force Dallas to wear the blue jerseys that they had a poor W-L record with.

    They opted for Orange Crush (and lost. Maybe they should have forced the ‘boys to wear their unlucky jerseys.

  • Joe Hilseberg | February 15, 2007 at 10:05 am |

    How did you know I was laughing?! hehe

    And as far as changing uni’s during a game…I’m almost 100% positive Ripken Jr. wore 5 jerseys the night of 2131.

  • Bob A | February 15, 2007 at 10:06 am |

    The Baseball Reliquary site has some really interesting items (though not actually uni-related). Well worth poking around, particularly the Collections section.

  • Metsfan AZ | February 15, 2007 at 10:07 am |

    [quote comment="55170"]How did you know I was laughing?! hehe

    And as far as changing uni’s during a game…I’m almost 100% positive Ripken Jr. wore 5 jerseys the night of 2131.[/quote]
    Wonder how much those go for?

  • jesse | February 15, 2007 at 10:09 am |

    The Gashouse Gang ’34 Cardinals didn’t wash their uniforms for weeks, I remember reading as a kid, and this hints to it:

    Wikipedia entry

  • House | February 15, 2007 at 10:09 am |

    Just a point about Gretzky and his tucked in jersey: As a kid his jersey was too big so he tucked in one side, he kept doing it out of superstition.

  • DrBear | February 15, 2007 at 10:14 am |

    Hey, cut the Cubs some slack! It takes a lot of money to overpay undertalented ballplayers. (Not that I’d advocate somebody sneaking in and replacing “UNDER ARMOR” with “UNDER ACHEIVING”)

  • Broker75 | February 15, 2007 at 10:16 am |

    It is bad luck for hockey sticks to lie crossed.
    It is bad luck to say “shutout” in the locker room before a game.
    Players believe they’ll win the game if they tap the goalie on his shin pads before a game.
    Many players must put their pads and skates on in exactly the same order every day.
    Patrick Roy would hop over the blue (or red) line, everytime he’d go out to his net.

  • Broker75 | February 15, 2007 at 10:19 am |

    Fishing anyone?
    Fish may not bite if a barefoot woman passes you on the way to the dock.
    Spit on your bait before casting your rod to make fish bite.
    Throw back your first catch for good luck.
    It is bad luck to change rods while fishing.
    Don’t tell anyone how many fish you’ve caught until you’re done or you won’t catch another.
    (sorry Paul, I know, there’s not one mention of uni’s here, but it’s interesting)…

  • Teebz | February 15, 2007 at 10:19 am |

    In a weird superstitious sort of thing, last season during Carolina’s run to the Stanley Cup, they endured a losing streak at the beginning of the season. There was an interview being done near the bench, and Ray Whitney stuck his head in the picture as a sort of “Hey Mom!” moment.

    “Whitney decided to just pop up during one of those TV interviews that are conducted by the bench. The first time he did it, the Hurricanes went on to win the game. Being a superstitious sort, Whitney continued his routine and had fun with as many TV bench interviews as possible, popping his head in just when the interviewer would least expect it.

    It became such a tradition, the Hurricanes put together a video montage of Whitney’s ‘camera hog’ moments and showed the tape at a team dinner during Carolina’s Cup run. Keeping a straight face that night was tougher than containing the Edmonton Oilers last June.”

    ESPN’s Linda Cohn ran the info on ESPN.com last week.

  • Joe Hilseberg | February 15, 2007 at 10:21 am |

    [quote comment="55172"][quote comment="55170"]How did you know I was laughing?! hehe

    And as far as changing uni’s during a game…I’m almost 100% positive Ripken Jr. wore 5 jerseys the night of 2131.[/quote]
    Wonder how much those go for?[/quote]

    I’m guessing he has one, and the rest are in museums, so they just don’t go anywhere.

  • Broker75 | February 15, 2007 at 10:22 am |

    good ol’ball game.
    Pitcher Turk Wendell brushes his teeth and chews licorice between every inning. Wade Boggs would eat only chicken the day of a game, and used to draw a symbol that means “To Life” in the dirt before every at-bat. Former pitcher Mark “The Bird” Fidrych used to play with the dirt on the mound and talk to himself and the ball before he pitched.

    Former Red Sox shortstop Nomar Garciaparra gets dressed the same way every day, makes sure to step on each dugout step with both feet, and tugs at his batting gloves and taps his toes during each at-bat.

  • tessa | February 15, 2007 at 10:27 am |

    Man, a girl goes away for a few days and it takes another few days to catch up on the posts and comments on this blog! Crazy.

    Just wanted to note that, according to Mark Feinsand‘s Yankees blog, not only have the Yankees not issued #30, they will also be wearing a black armband in remembrance of Cory Lidle. I assume that because this is a recent news item on his blog, that it has not been covered here (the armband part, anyway). My apologies if my assumption is incorrect.

    I will be very glad to see the Yankees remember Cory Lidle this way. I am glad that he will be remembered appropriately, even though he was not with the Yankees for long.

  • Ian K | February 15, 2007 at 10:28 am |

    [quote comment="55148"]
    There’s the hockey tradition of ‘Playoff Beards’, too…[/quote]

    The Astros did this when they made it to the World Series in 2005 as well. I love the playoff beard and I also like to play along when the Dodgers make it to the playoffs but last year it pretty much meant I went 5 days without shaving and that didn’t amount to much.

  • Sir Jock Strap | February 15, 2007 at 10:28 am |

    As we like to say in the game business … in regards to Christine’s recollection, Paul’s dismissal and Christines return … Paul, you were pwned.

    Or as we used to say in the East Bay … moeded, feeling hecka crunchy, feeling mighty green.

  • Broker75 | February 15, 2007 at 10:30 am |

    Sports and the Number 13
    A handful of athletes who dared to wear the infamous number
    Branca, a pitcher for the Brooklyn Dodgers, wore no. 13 and, as legend has it, playfully posed with black cats before the 1951 playoffs began. He would become famous in the 1951 playoffs for surrendering Bobby Thomson’s “shot heard round the world” home run, one of the most famous home runs of all-time.

  • Kek | February 15, 2007 at 10:32 am |

    Aside from the already mentioned Steelers wearing the white, I believe that the year the 49ers beat the Chargers in the Super Bowl, they wore their 75th Anniversary throwbacks throughout the playoffs. I think they had to get permission from the NFL because the jerseys did not have TV numbers. I guess they were only to be used on the designated dates and the Niner went above and beyond that.

    Not that it was luck, but I remember hearing rumors that Pete Rose changed his uniform every inning of the game he broke the hit record in. That way he could sell them as “game worn” when he hit #4,192.

    I guess you do whatever when you owe bookies!

  • Sir Jock Strap | February 15, 2007 at 10:33 am |

    I believe Gary Carter wouldn’t change underwear during a hitting streak.

    Mark McGwire used the same cup since he was in high school, until it was stolen during his record breaking year.

    Giambi wears the underwear of his female companion from the previous evening, under his uniform.

  • Banker Bill | February 15, 2007 at 10:36 am |

    I don’t know if he did it for luck or fear , but the Gerry Cheevers stitch marks on the face mask was one of the most unique things I ever saw. Every time a puck would hit him in the mask, he’d draw stich marks where the stitches in his face would have been.

  • Broker75 | February 15, 2007 at 10:38 am |

    Athletes Who Have Worn No. 13:

    NFL
    Danny Kanell – Atlanta
    Kurt Warner – St. Louis

    NHL
    Bill Guerin – Boston
    Valeri Kamensky – NY Rangers
    Slava Kozlov – Detroit
    German Titov – Anaheim
    Alexei Zhamnov – Chicago

    MLB
    Edgardo Alfonzo – NY Mets
    Adrian Brown – Pittsburgh
    Jeff D’Amico – Milwaukee
    Omar Vizquel – Cleveland
    Alex Rodriguez – NY Yankees

  • Michael Churchill | February 15, 2007 at 10:38 am |

    [quote comment="55187"]I believe Gary Carter wouldn’t change underwear during a hitting streak.

    Mark McGwire used the same cup since he was in high school, until it was stolen during his record breaking year.

    Giambi wears the underwear of his female companion from the previous evening, under his uniform.[/quote]

    Wouldn’t it be great if these were true?

  • Adam McCracken | February 15, 2007 at 10:41 am |

    Wow I hadn’t heard about those Hornets Jerseys. I find it amazing that they say Oklahoma City on them. With all the speculation that the NBA will move the Sonics there I find it intriguing that they have those. Or it may mean nothing just a way to honor the city for being such a good substitute home.

  • Broker75 | February 15, 2007 at 10:41 am |

    Dan Marino – Football

    This former Miami Dolphins quarterback and Hall of Famer holds all-time NFL records in passing touchdowns and passing yards. It’s kind of tough to consider him “unlucky.” But he never did win that Super Bowl ring, did he??

    Buck Martinez – Baseball

    Martinez wore no. 13 as a catcher for the Toronto Blue Jays. He lasted 17 years in the big leagues but had a career batting average of just (gulp) .225. In 1985, he was bowled over by a player attempting to score and severely dislocated his ankle, effectively ending his playing career. He wore # 13 as manager of the Blue Jays, and was fired one year later.

    Mats Sundin – Hockey

    This captain of the Toronto Maple Leafs, in November, 2001, received an errant pass from teammate Bryan McCabe that caught him squarely in the face. He suffered a cut between his eyes and forehead that required 15 stitches. Actually, for a hockey player, this may just be all in a day’s work. Sundin’s response to McCabe the next day? “Nice pass.”

  • Ben Wideman | February 15, 2007 at 10:43 am |

    Anyone else notice this note about the Yankee’s uniform alteration for this coming season?

    Black Arm Bands

  • Sir Jock Strap | February 15, 2007 at 10:51 am |

    [quote comment="55192"][quote comment="55187"]I believe Gary Carter wouldn’t change underwear during a hitting streak.

    Mark McGwire used the same cup since he was in high school, until it was stolen during his record breaking year.

    Giambi wears the underwear of his female companion from the previous evening, under his uniform.[/quote]

    Wouldn’t it be great if these were true?[/quote]

    Heard the Gary Carter one when I was a little leaguer. Probably heard the George Brett hemerroid story the same day.

    Heard the McGwire one in an interview between him and Dan Patrick. True.

    Heard the Giambi one from a former Oakland A clubhouse attendant. Could be true.

  • Aram | February 15, 2007 at 10:56 am |

    A couple college hockey superstitions from the University of Michigan. For home games, the players are not told what jersey color they are wearing until they enter the lockerroom- white or maize (the best alternate jersey in all of sports). I guess it’s a little bit of a uni-related motivational tool.

    There’s a maize M set into the blue carpeting in the center of the lockerroom that may not be stepped on by anybody for any reason.

    And, this is probably universal, but certain guys have certain ways they want their equipment set up in their lockers, and want no one else to touch them before they put it on. I got to take a tour of the lockerroom, and was emphatically told not to touch anything in any of the lockers as the guys get major-league superstitious about that stuff.

  • Zach | February 15, 2007 at 10:57 am |

    I was at the Wake Forest/Clemson game last night and Wake wore throwbacks to I think probably sometime in the 90′s but it could be farther back than that. They also had some patch on it that I never could make out. I can’t find any pictures but you can see the jersey on the game recap page on espn

  • NickNH | February 15, 2007 at 10:58 am |

    [quote comment="55182"][quote comment="55148"]
    There’s the hockey tradition of ‘Playoff Beards’, too…[/quote]

    The Astros did this when they made it to the World Series in 2005 as well. I love the playoff beard and I also like to play along when the Dodgers make it to the playoffs but last year it pretty much meant I went 5 days without shaving and that didn’t amount to much.[/quote]

    Playoff beards are one of my favorite traditions in sports.

    I decided I was gonna take it a step further for this college hockey season. I shaved on September 30th, the day of Boston University’s first official practice. I haven’t shaved since, and I won’t shave until BU’s season is over, hopefully in April after the Frozen Four.

    I may even extend it to the NHL and keep the beard for as long as a BU alum in the playoffs is still playing, especially since Chris Drury’s my favorite player.

  • tessa | February 15, 2007 at 10:59 am |

    [quote comment="55195"]Anyone else notice this note about the Yankee’s uniform alteration for this coming season?

    Black Arm Bands[/quote]

    Yup – I noted it in #33. I only mention it now because the story in the blog that I referenced is a little more complete than the AP one on ESPN. It also notes the other former Yankees (and Mel Allen) who have been honored in the same way.

  • Stuby | February 15, 2007 at 11:00 am |

    [quote comment="55190"]Athletes Who Have Worn No. 13:

    NFL
    Danny Kanell – Atlanta
    Kurt Warner – St. Louis

    NHL
    Bill Guerin – Boston
    Valeri Kamensky – NY Rangers
    Slava Kozlov – Detroit
    German Titov – Anaheim
    Alexei Zhamnov – Chicago

    MLB
    Edgardo Alfonzo – NY Mets
    Adrian Brown – Pittsburgh
    Jeff D’Amico – Milwaukee
    Omar Vizquel – Cleveland
    Alex Rodriguez – NY Yankees[/quote]
    And my all time favorite player name, Juan Tyrone Eichelberger of the Padres, Indians and Braves.

    Oh, yeah. And Steve Nash

  • Broker75 | February 15, 2007 at 11:10 am |

    Paul, scroll down, you (and this site) were mentioned in the article.
    I hope they got your rights, and you got some $$, for using your name and site(TM)

  • Cliff Rancho | February 15, 2007 at 11:11 am |

    While I can’t s[quote comment="55197"][quote comment="55192"][quote comment="55187"]I believe Gary Carter wouldn’t change underwear during a hitting streak.

    Mark McGwire used the same cup since he was in high school, until it was stolen during his record breaking year.

    Giambi wears the underwear of his female companion from the previous evening, under his uniform.[/quote]

    Wouldn’t it be great if these were true?[/quote]

    Heard the Gary Carter one when I was a little leaguer. Probably heard the George Brett hemerroid story the same day.

    Heard the McGwire one in an interview between him and Dan Patrick. True.

    Heard the Giambi one from a former Oakland A clubhouse attendant. Could be true.[/quote]

    While I can’t say that I know he doesn’t wear the underwear from females companions, I can say that he always has a glittery male thong in his locker that he wears.

  • Metsfan AZ | February 15, 2007 at 11:22 am |

    [quote comment="55206"]While I can’t s[quote comment="55197"][quote comment="55192"][quote comment="55187"]I believe Gary Carter wouldn’t change underwear during a hitting streak.

    Mark McGwire used the same cup since he was in high school, until it was stolen during his record breaking year.

    Giambi wears the underwear of his female companion from the previous evening, under his uniform.[/quote]

    Wouldn’t it be great if these were true?[/quote]

    Heard the Gary Carter one when I was a little leaguer. Probably heard the George Brett hemerroid story the same day.

    Heard the McGwire one in an interview between him and Dan Patrick. True.

    Heard the Giambi one from a former Oakland A clubhouse attendant. Could be true.[/quote]

    While I can’t say that I know he doesn’t wear the underwear from females companions, I can say that he always has a glittery male thong in his locker that he wears.[/quote]
    that’s the kind of thing you should keep to yourself.

  • Broker75 | February 15, 2007 at 11:30 am |

    [quote comment="55210"][quote comment="55206"]While I can’t s[quote comment="55197"][quote comment="55192"][quote comment="55187"]I believe Gary Carter wouldn’t change underwear during a hitting streak.

    Mark McGwire used the same cup since he was in high school, until it was stolen during his record breaking year.

    Giambi wears the underwear of his female companion from the previous evening, under his uniform.[/quote]

    Wouldn’t it be great if these were true?[/quote]

    Heard the Gary Carter one when I was a little leaguer. Probably heard the George Brett hemerroid story the same day.

    Heard the McGwire one in an interview between him and Dan Patrick. True.

    Heard the Giambi one from a former Oakland A clubhouse attendant. Could be true.[/quote]

    While I can’t say that I know he doesn’t wear the underwear from females companions, I can say that he always has a glittery male thong in his locker that he wears.[/quote]
    that’s the kind of thing you should keep to yourself.[/quote]
    yeah, that’s home talk.

  • Joe Hilseberg | February 15, 2007 at 11:32 am |

    [quote comment="55205"]Paul, scroll down, you (and this site) were mentioned in the article.
    I hope they got your rights, and you got some $$, for using your name and site(TM)[/quote]

    Please see the links list on the top right please. Those site are all uniwatch friendly

  • Burrill | February 15, 2007 at 11:34 am |

    [quote comment="55206"]I can say that he always has a glittery male thong in his locker that he wears.[/quote]

    Wait — he wears a locker? That must be awkward.

  • TonyE | February 15, 2007 at 11:37 am |

    The Cubs are going to put Under Armour ads on Wrigley Field’s outfield doors.

    Couple of things to consider here:

    Under Armour? Terrible choice for Wrigley signage. They are the “under the radar screen” evil logo creep cousin of Nike and Reebok…

    http://cityinsights....

    Any real Cubs fan would have to say that for all the free advertising that William Sianis (Mr. Cheezburger from Billy Goat’s Tavern) has received over the years from his ridiculous curse, that his logo should adorn those doors in the ivy.

    And yes keep the slogan “Enter At Your Risk!” becuase that’s what dumbass Cubs fans like me do year after year after year…

    The Tribune Company strikes again.

  • Eric | February 15, 2007 at 11:44 am |

    [quote comment="55198"]There’s a maize M set into the blue carpeting in the center of the lockerroom that may not be stepped on by anybody for any reason.[/quote]

    The Lightning did this during their 2004 Stanley Cup run, and I believe there were fines levied if anyone stepped on it.

    As far as the #13 thing, Jiri Novotny for the Sabres wears it, and Pavel Kubina used to when he was with the Lightning.

  • Smail | February 15, 2007 at 11:51 am |

    Looking at Ovie’s sticks, the “Man with two legs” looks like the number 300 written sideways. Any chance that number holds significance to him?

  • Paul Lukas | February 15, 2007 at 11:54 am |

    Just wanted to note that, according to Mark Feinsand‘s Yankees blog, not only have the Yankees not issued #30, they will also be wearing a black armband in remembrance of Cory Lidle. I assume that because this is a recent news item on his blog, that it has not been covered here (the armband part, anyway).

    It was just announced this morning.

    Meanwhile: Today’s ESPN column is up. Look here.

  • Joel Larson | February 15, 2007 at 12:02 pm |

    from Wikipedia:

    Typical of Kruk’s (and Phils) roughcut style in the 1993 season, Kruk tore the seat of his pants in a hard slide during the final playoff game against Atlanta. He refused to change and wore the torn pants for the rest of the game. During the 1993 World Series, Kruk wore the same pants (with the tear sewn up), possibly for good luck.

    Unfortunately I also have this image of them zooming in on that tear every time he came to the plate (an image I wish wasn’t seared into my memory) but I can’t seem to find visual evidence of this on the “interwebs”. It must be out there somewhere.

  • Tony | February 15, 2007 at 12:03 pm |

    I seem to recall seeing a photo of Ed Kranepool and Dave Kingman wearing hair curlers in the NY Daily News in 77′. But in fairness to Dock Ellis, they were in a hair salon, not in Shea Stadium.

  • Seth H | February 15, 2007 at 12:08 pm |

    Some spring training uni info from today’s NY Post:

    The Yankees expect every pitcher and catcher on hand today for the first workout.

    Pitchers and catchers had their lockers stocked with blue mesh hats with white piping on each side and an interlocking silver NY, and mesh shirts with white sides.

    While the hats and shirts look like something out of the New Rochelle softball league, it’s expected fans will rush out to buy the non-traditional garb once they see the Yankees wear it during the exhibition season.

    “It’s all about marketing,” a Yankees employee said.

    Many players mocked the hats and shirts, but Mike Mussina put it best by saying, “My first impression is that it’s not [the] classic Yankee uniform.”

    and

    The Mets have changed their spring training uniforms slightly, going with shirts that have an orange swatch under each armpit. The jerseys also are now pullovers. Last year they had buttons down the front.

    Some great stuff in the Yankees piece.

  • Ronnie Poore | February 15, 2007 at 12:19 pm |

    Frank Ryan wore 13 when quarterbacking the Browns in the ’60s. that was the Jim Brown era. Cleveland won the NFL title in 64 with Ryan at QB.

  • Christopher | February 15, 2007 at 12:36 pm |

    [quote comment="55202"][quote comment="55195"]Anyone else notice this note about the Yankee’s uniform alteration for this coming season?

    Black Arm Bands[/quote]

    Yup – I noted it in #33. I only mention it now because the story in the blog that I referenced is a little more complete than the AP one on ESPN. It also notes the other former Yankees (and Mel Allen) who have been honored in the same way.[/quote]

    Anyone have a picture of an older armband for one of these aforementioned memorials?

    I assume the Liddle one is not released yet…

  • BCrisp | February 15, 2007 at 12:49 pm |

    Back to the superstition discussion:
    What about the many MLBers who wear scuffed up/pine tarred helmets. Craig Biggio, Manny Ramirez, and Vlad Guerro to name a few.
    I remember when the Astros last changed their uniforms that Biggio immediately scuffed his helmet up on the wall.
    We need a scientific experiment to decide who has the most pine tar on their helmet.

  • John in SF | February 15, 2007 at 12:50 pm |

    Paul,

    How did you forget about soccer cleats?

    So much there re laces!

    The soccer cleat has the tongue flap, not to protect the laces, but to provide a flat top of the shoe for kicking the ball. See Ronaldinho line up his shot.

    On many cleats, the laces are super long. When I played ultimate frisbee and wore soccer cleats, the tradition was to wrap the laces around the bottom of the shoe. See here. If you look close, you can see that she has wrapped her laces around.

    (logo creep alert!) If you check out the adidas cleats page, you can see what I’m talking about. Both men’s and women’s cleat have the tongue flap, but the women’s cleat has the laces wrapped around the bottom.

    Thoughts? How did YOU wear them?

    -John

  • Robert | February 15, 2007 at 12:50 pm |

    I love that 1973 Dock Ellis baseball card. That is my favorite style baseball card of all time. There were a lot of good action photos, and the layout was outstanding.

  • Philly Bill | February 15, 2007 at 12:53 pm |

    [quote comment="55272"]Paul,

    How did you forget about soccer cleats?

    So much there re laces!

    The soccer cleat has the tongue flap, not to protect the laces, but to provide a flat top of the shoe for kicking the ball. See Ronaldinho line up his shot.

    On many cleats, the laces are super long. When I played ultimate frisbee and wore soccer cleats, the tradition was to wrap the laces around the bottom of the shoe. See here. If you look close, you can see that she has wrapped her laces around.

    (logo creep alert!) If you check out the adidas cleats page, you can see what I’m talking about. Both men’s and women’s cleat have the tongue flap, but the women’s cleat has the laces wrapped around the bottom.

    Thoughts? How did YOU wear them?

    -John[/quote]

    Hey, Paul wears his baseball spikes with the laces wrapped around the bottom!

  • Paul Lukas | February 15, 2007 at 12:55 pm |

    [quote comment="55272"]How did you forget about soccer cleats?

    So much there re laces![/quote]

    As dozens of ESPN readers are now informing me. As usual, I plead utter ignorance when it comes to soccer.

  • TyShula | February 15, 2007 at 12:57 pm |

    they started a doubleheader at 6 PM?

    strange, but true. luckily, Ellis’ no-hitter took just 2:13 to complete

  • joe | February 15, 2007 at 12:58 pm |

    [quote comment="55218"][quote comment="55198"]There’s a maize M set into the blue carpeting in the center of the lockerroom that may not be stepped on by anybody for any reason.[/quote]

    The Lightning did this during their 2004 Stanley Cup run, and I believe there were fines levied if anyone stepped on it.

    As far as the #13 thing, Jiri Novotny for the Sabres wears it, and Pavel Kubina used to when he was with the Lightning.[/quote]

    how could anyone on the lightening get fined for stepping on the UM logo in ann arbor? you think they would have been in florida. :)

  • PAULtergeist | February 15, 2007 at 1:06 pm |

    [quote comment="55178"]In a weird superstitious sort of thing, last season during Carolina’s run to the Stanley Cup, they endured a losing streak at the beginning of the season. There was an interview being done near the bench, and Ray Whitney stuck his head in the picture as a sort of “Hey Mom!” moment.

    “Whitney decided to just pop up during one of those TV interviews that are conducted by the bench. The first time he did it, the Hurricanes went on to win the game. Being a superstitious sort, Whitney continued his routine and had fun with as many TV bench interviews as possible, popping his head in just when the interviewer would least expect it.

    It became such a tradition, the Hurricanes put together a video montage of Whitney’s ‘camera hog’ moments and showed the tape at a team dinner during Carolina’s Cup run. Keeping a straight face that night was tougher than containing the Edmonton Oilers last June.”

    ESPN’s Linda Cohn ran the info on ESPN.com last week.[/quote]

    Mike Commodore started a superstitious trend last year during the Canes run in which he wore a bathrobe and grew out his hair…The fans latched on and started following suit…

  • korryn | February 15, 2007 at 1:07 pm |

    The NBA all-star uniform got more frightening — and a dreaded promotion. http://www.benmaller...

  • Burrill | February 15, 2007 at 1:08 pm |

    [quote comment="55282"]how could anyone on the lightening get fined for stepping on the UM logo in ann arbor? you think they would have been in florida. :)[/quote]

    I know Yost is a great hockey venue, but I didn’t know it was good enough to host the NHL playoffs!

  • John in Sacramento | February 15, 2007 at 1:08 pm |

    Giambi wears the underwear of his female companion from the previous evening, under his uniform.[/quote]

    So you’re saying Giambi dates women who wear the same size pants as he does?

    Also, isn’t driving to LAX to catch a flight to San Diego like leaving home in Brooklyn and driving to JFK to catch a flight to Philly? I guess in those days you could park in front of the terminal, walk in with your bags and get right on the plane.

  • Michael James | February 15, 2007 at 1:19 pm |

    Michael King of the Milwaukee Wave has worn #13 since he signed with the team in 1992 (and is still active at age 43).

    He obviously his luck hasn’t been too bad. He is just the team’s all-time leading scorer and (I believe) holds the team record for games played. Even his bobbleheadhas his uniform number.

  • Michael James | February 15, 2007 at 1:20 pm |

    [quote comment="55294"]Even his bobblehead has his uniform number.[/quote]

    Cute, Kenn.

  • Oakdale Panther | February 15, 2007 at 1:22 pm |

    On the 1970s-era Pirates, Dock Ellis was a character’s character. Nowadays the outrageous statements and behaviors of certain athletes would make Ellis’ antics seem like kindergarten stuff, but back then he was definitely one who enjoyed rocking the Establishment much as Muhammad Ali did. Dock butted heads with old-school managers Danny Murtaugh and Bill Virdon. To use a phrase from the time, he was perceived as “uppity”. My sense from following the team at the time is that his fellow Pirates just rolled their eyes. Dock was a money pitcher, so they cut him a lot of slack.

    One time Ellis was sent in as a pinch runner. He took the field wearing a warmup jacket, only to be told by the umpire to remove the coat; only the current pitcher could wear a jacket on the bases. Ellis undressed to reveal his undershirt but no uniform top, so he couldn’t remain in the game.

    Curlers, LSD, brash statements — that was Dock. I have a copy of the book you referenced and it is dead-on.

    I’ll tell you, though… I saw Ellis in his prime outduel Tom Seaver at Three Rivers. When he was healthy, there wasn’t a more talented pitcher in baseball.

  • Philly Bill | February 15, 2007 at 1:29 pm |

    Not a wooden stick in the bunch — all composite. The #12-label goalie sticks at far left reportedly belong to Brent Johnson, who wears #1. Recent call-up Eric Fehr (#14) uses some pretty long sticks. And look at all the tape on the butt-ends of Chris Clarks’s sticks. Is that even legal?

    As for uni superstitions, I recall the Phillies wearing caps like this on Sundays for one season, losing virtually every Sunday game, then abruptly discontinuing the practice. (At least they didn’t wear these.) They still have this alternate cap, which I believe is used for interleague games. (The BP caps are yet another style, with a blue “P”.)

    In searching for Phillies images, it’s horrifying how many of them are some variation of this train wreck — yet another called third strike! Maybe I’m not looking forward to baseball season after all…

  • schuby | February 15, 2007 at 1:30 pm |

    On the ESPN column today, under basketball it shows these shoes. Whose are they and why does it say Jumangi27 on them. It says he plays for the Sonics so who is 27 for them?

  • Brandon Davis | February 15, 2007 at 1:32 pm |

    Regarding Bill Belichick at the Pro Bowl, as referenced in the end of today’s ESPN column here, isn’t the US flag patch facing backwards?
    I believe this topic came up when the flag was on the American jerseys in the Wolrd Baseball Classic.

  • Philly Bill | February 15, 2007 at 1:34 pm |

    [quote comment="55280"]they started a doubleheader at 6 PM?

    strange, but true. luckily, Ellis’ no-hitter took just 2:13 to complete[/quote]

    Once upon a time they would schedule both games at night and you only had to pay for one ticket to see both games. My first ever MLB game was one of these deals — Phillies vs. Padres at the Vet, August 30, 1983. At age 6, I’m sure I was asleep by about the third inning of game 2, but I remember game 1 was the first MLB shutout pitched by then-rookie Kevin Gross.

  • Anthony Verna | February 15, 2007 at 1:39 pm |

    Philly Bill, I can’t find a pic of the alt caps from 1994. They were blue.

    Kruk was on Letterman in the middle of the season shredding the blue caps because, yes, they lost all the games they played in the blue caps.

  • Philly Bill | February 15, 2007 at 1:39 pm |

    [quote comment="55304"]On the ESPN column today, under basketball it shows these shoes. Whose are they and why does it say Jumangi27 on them. It says he plays for the Sonics so who is 27 for them?[/quote]

    Johan Petro. Simple research, man.

  • Philly Bill | February 15, 2007 at 1:43 pm |

    [quote comment="55310"]Philly Bill, I can’t find a pic of the alt caps from 1994. They were blue.

    Kruk was on Letterman in the middle of the season shredding the blue caps because, yes, they lost all the games they played in the blue caps.[/quote]

    Man, I’ve got Alzheimer’s if the year I’m thinking of was that long ago! I think they tried it again more recently — during the time I was actually living in South Philly, 1998-2002 — with those caps with the blue stars on either side of the “P”.

  • Matthew S. | February 15, 2007 at 1:52 pm |

    [quote comment="55271"]Back to the superstition discussion:
    What about the many MLBers who wear scuffed up/pine tarred helmets. Craig Biggio, Manny Ramirez, and Vlad Guerro to name a few.
    I remember when the Astros last changed their uniforms that Biggio immediately scuffed his helmet up on the wall.
    We need a scientific experiment to decide who has the most pine tar on their helmet.[/quote]

    Biggio doesn’t let anyone try to clean his helmet or even do touchups. In 1999, the last year the Astros wore their navy and gold uniforms, Biggio’s star decal on his batting helmet was slowly peeling off. He wouldn’t even allow the equipment manager to apply a new one. This was in July or August I believe of 1999 and he wore it that way for the remainder of the season and in the playoffs.

    In 2000, when the Astros got new uniforms, there was a story from spring training about Biggio breaking in his new helmet. Upon being issued his new equipment, the first thing he did was put the helmet on and go to the nearest concrete wall and start banging his helmeted head into the wall.

    Baseball and hockey players are probably the most superstitious people out there.

  • patrick | February 15, 2007 at 1:54 pm |

    [quote comment="55272"]Paul,

    How did you forget about soccer cleats?

    So much there re laces!

    The soccer cleat has the tongue flap, not to protect the laces, but to provide a flat top of the shoe for kicking the ball. See Ronaldinho line up his shot.

    On many cleats, the laces are super long. When I played ultimate frisbee and wore soccer cleats, the tradition was to wrap the laces around the bottom of the shoe. See here. If you look close, you can see that she has wrapped her laces around.

    (logo creep alert!) If you check out the adidas cleats page, you can see what I’m talking about. Both men’s and women’s cleat have the tongue flap, but the women’s cleat has the laces wrapped around the bottom.

    Thoughts? How did YOU wear them?

    -John[/quote]

    John,
    When I started playing soccer, the sign of having “good” cleats was having the tonue flap (and white soles), however since then that has come somewhat out of fad. Now, many companies, particularly nike use an off center lace up to avoid the problem altogether. Instead, they use a tiny tongue that is essentially non existent above the top eyelet.
    As far as the laces, they are extremely long and I as well looped em under the bottom, although I also for a period, wrapped em around the ankle. Also, while not seen much in pro soccer, in youth soccer the big fad is the white athletic tape around your upper ankle to keep your shin guards up. I know kids who used electrical tape, athletic tape, duct tape etc. some even coordinated electrical tape to their colors. Because soccer socks are made out of a couple different materials, you’d have to find a tape that would stick to a sweaty sock. The worst socks were the synthetic ones, the tape would never stay up. Now with shinguard sleeves its not as prevalent.
    One last point, One of the coolest thing to do was to roll your waistband over once, then tuck in your jersey, leaving the Adidas label flapping in the wind.

  • Jokelahoma | February 15, 2007 at 2:02 pm |

    Don’t forget Dave Concepcion in the list of athletes wearing number 13.

  • muskiejim | February 15, 2007 at 2:05 pm |

    [quote comment="55184"]
    Branca, a pitcher for the Brooklyn Dodgers, wore no. 13 and, as legend has it, playfully posed with black cats before the 1951 playoffs began. He would become famous in the 1951 playoffs for surrendering Bobby Thomson’s “shot heard round the world” home run, one of the most famous home runs of all-time.[/quote]

    Can’t believe no one called broker out on this one, but that game wasn’t in the playoffs. How could the Giants been playing the Dodgers in the playoffs? The’re both NL teams. The NLCS didn’t start until 1969.

  • Shaftman | February 15, 2007 at 2:11 pm |

    [quote comment="55325"][quote comment="55184"]
    Branca, a pitcher for the Brooklyn Dodgers, wore no. 13 and, as legend has it, playfully posed with black cats before the 1951 playoffs began. He would become famous in the 1951 playoffs for surrendering Bobby Thomson’s “shot heard round the world” home run, one of the most famous home runs of all-time.[/quote]

    Can’t believe no one called broker out on this one, but that game wasn’t in the playoffs. How could the Giants been playing the Dodgers in the playoffs? The’re both NL teams. The NLCS didn’t start until 1969.[/quote]

    Best of 3 playoff series to decide the pennant due to the two teams being tied after the regular season.

  • Stuby | February 15, 2007 at 2:21 pm |

    [quote comment="55323"]Don’t forget Dave Concepcion in the list of athletes wearing number 13.[/quote]
    Pete Rose used to pronounce his name ‘conception’, as I recall.

  • tBone | February 15, 2007 at 2:22 pm |

    Here is a little blurb about the Mariners’ new Spring Training hats. Has anyone seen these? I’d like to get a picture of how horrible they are.

  • WVU Tom | February 15, 2007 at 2:24 pm |

    [quote comment="55311"][quote comment="55304"]On the ESPN column today, under basketball it shows these shoes. Whose are they and why does it say Jumangi27 on them. It says he plays for the Sonics so who is 27 for them?[/quote]

    Johan Petro. Simple research, man.[/quote]

    The American Flag, when worn on as a patch or, for example, when appearing on military vehicles, is supposed to face “backward” when applied on the right side.

    Simple version: Think of it as how you would view a flag, flying on a post, with the wind moving from right to left. In case of uniforms or vehicles, the flag is depicted as if the wind direction were from front to back.

  • WVU Tom | February 15, 2007 at 2:27 pm |

    [quote comment="55307"]Regarding Bill Belichick at the Pro Bowl, as referenced in the end of today’s ESPN column here, isn’t the US flag patch facing backwards?
    I believe this topic came up when the flag was on the American jerseys in the Wolrd Baseball Classic.[/quote]

    Sorry, I quoted the wrong comment on my last post (#95)! My comment was actually in reference to the above question.

    The American Flag, when worn on as a patch or, for example, when appearing on military vehicles, is supposed to face “backward” when applied on the right side.

    Simple version: Think of it as how you would view a flag, flying on a post, with the wind moving from right to left. In case of uniforms or vehicles, the flag is depicted as if the wind direction were from front to back.

  • Kevin | February 15, 2007 at 2:36 pm |

    good ESPN column

    i have recently switched to canary yellow laces on my work shoes, which are black. looks great

  • Richard Stover | February 15, 2007 at 2:39 pm |

    One word:

    Aglet

  • Metsfan AZ | February 15, 2007 at 2:42 pm |

    [quote comment="55345"]good ESPN column

    i have recently switched to canary yellow laces on my work shoes, which are black. looks great[/quote]
    wingtips? steel toes?

  • joe | February 15, 2007 at 2:46 pm |

    [quote comment="55289"]Giambi wears the underwear of his female companion from the previous evening, under his uniform.[/quote]

    So you’re saying Giambi dates women who wear the same size pants as he does?

    Also, isn’t driving to LAX to catch a flight to San Diego like leaving home in Brooklyn and driving to JFK to catch a flight to Philly? I guess in those days you could park in front of the terminal, walk in with your bags and get right on the plane.[/quote]

    Well the ‘roids would make him fit easier.

  • Joey Guns | February 15, 2007 at 2:46 pm |

    [quote comment="55280"]they started a doubleheader at 6 PM?

    strange, but true. luckily, Ellis’ no-hitter took just 2:13 to complete[/quote]

    I’m not sure why it’s so strange that a no-hitter took just 2:13. Last year, Anibal Sanchez’s no no also took 2:13.

  • Sara Jane | February 15, 2007 at 3:02 pm |

    I watched Peyton on Letterman, and he didn’t say that he changed his entire uniform for “luck” or superstition. He said he did it to stay occupied during the 45 minute halftime, and to get out of a soaked uniform because he thought that it might stop raining. I’m baffled why TheIndyChannel.com reported that he hoped it would bring him luck; he definitely didn’t even imply that in the Letterman interview.

    If you didn’t see it, definitely watch it; it’s a great interview. It’s on YouTube (for now, anyway) and Peyton talks about changing his uniform at about 5:35.

  • Mark in Cincy | February 15, 2007 at 3:03 pm |

    [quote comment="55323"]Don’t forget Dave Concepcion in the list of athletes wearing number 13.[/quote]

    Davey, ditch the black! of course, he was just ahead of the game with the black, as he was playing shortstop. he belongs in the HOF . . . just my two cents

  • Sara Jane | February 15, 2007 at 3:04 pm |

    Argh… here’s the link to Peyton on Letterman:

    http://www.youtube.c...

  • dgc | February 15, 2007 at 3:06 pm |

    [quote comment="55354"][quote comment="55280"]they started a doubleheader at 6 PM?

    strange, but true. luckily, Ellis’ no-hitter took just 2:13 to complete[/quote]

    I’m not sure why it’s so strange that a no-hitter took just 2:13.

    Last year, Anibal Sanchez’s no no also took 2:13.[/quote]

    The strange part is that the first game of a doubleheader started at 6 PM.

  • Alex in Augsburg | February 15, 2007 at 3:06 pm |

    Paul,

    How did you forget about soccer cleats?

    So much there re laces!

    The soccer cleat has the tongue flap, not to protect the laces, but to provide a flat top of the shoe for kicking the ball. See Ronaldinho line up his shot.

    On many cleats, the laces are super long. When I played ultimate frisbee and wore soccer cleats, the tradition was to wrap the laces around the bottom of the shoe. See here. If you look close, you can see that she has wrapped her laces around.

    (logo creep alert!) If you check out the adidas cleats page, you can see what I’m talking about. Both men’s and women’s cleat have the tongue flap, but the women’s cleat has the laces wrapped around the bottom.

    Thoughts? How did YOU wear them?

    -John

    Hey John, the “laces” on the women’s shoes aren’t laces. It’s an elastic band that is attached to the tongue flap, so the flap stays down. In theory the flap is supposed to stay down on it’s own through it’s curvature, but since women on average have smaller the feet the flap doesn’t stay put and exposes the the laces and the knot.

  • John | February 15, 2007 at 3:08 pm |

    [quote comment="55190"]Athletes Who Have Worn No. 13:

    NFL
    Danny Kanell – Atlanta
    Kurt Warner – St. Louis

    NHL
    Bill Guerin – Boston
    Valeri Kamensky – NY Rangers
    Slava Kozlov – Detroit
    German Titov – Anaheim
    Alexei Zhamnov – Chicago

    MLB
    Edgardo Alfonzo – NY Mets
    Adrian Brown – Pittsburgh
    Jeff D’Amico – Milwaukee
    Omar Vizquel – Cleveland
    Alex Rodriguez – NY Yankees[/quote]

    NHL: Claude Lapointe – Islanders/Flyers

  • Broker75 | February 15, 2007 at 3:10 pm |

    [quote comment="55213"][quote comment="55205"]Paul, scroll down, you (and this site) were mentioned in the article.
    I hope they got your rights, and you got some $$, for using your name and site(TM)[/quote]

    Please see the links list on the top right please. Those site are all uniwatch friendly[/quote]
    I don’t know exactly what you mean, but whatever..

  • Chad G | February 15, 2007 at 3:11 pm |

    I hate to be that guy…but it’s starting to annoy me that a bunch of people are “reporting” on certain teams new bp caps when we’ve know about them for months and how they look. You can see them all on the New Era web site, they have been up for awhile.
    Here is the Mariners cap that was requested.

    I apoligize for my hostility

  • Ron | February 15, 2007 at 3:13 pm |

    Also, Dan Marino and Tim Rattay.

    [quote comment="55190"]Athletes Who Have Worn No. 13:

    NFL
    Danny Kanell – Atlanta
    Kurt Warner – St. Louis

    NHL
    Bill Guerin – Boston
    Valeri Kamensky – NY Rangers
    Slava Kozlov – Detroit
    German Titov – Anaheim
    Alexei Zhamnov – Chicago

    MLB
    Edgardo Alfonzo – NY Mets
    Adrian Brown – Pittsburgh
    Jeff D’Amico – Milwaukee
    Omar Vizquel – Cleveland
    Alex Rodriguez – NY Yankees[/quote]

  • schuby | February 15, 2007 at 3:14 pm |

    [quote comment="55311"][quote comment="55304"]On the ESPN column today, under basketball it shows these shoes. Whose are they and why does it say Jumangi27 on them. It says he plays for the Sonics so who is 27 for them?[/quote]

    Johan Petro. Simple research, man.[/quote]

    Thanks, but don’t rip on me, man, i’m a little sick and just too lazy to look stuff up today.
    It’s easier to post.

  • Joey Guns | February 15, 2007 at 3:14 pm |

    [quote comment="55359"]Argh… here’s the link to Peyton on Letterman:

    http://www.youtube.c...[/quote]

    I agree. He basically said he was bored during the LONG halftime, so he decided to change his jersey to pass the time, and because it was wet. Luck was never mentioned at all.

    My favorite part was when he said how scared he would’ve been in Jim Sorgi would’ve actually had to go in!

  • Bouj | February 15, 2007 at 3:18 pm |

    RE: The new BP jerseys

    Does that mean they are scrapping the twill numbers in favor of the heat pressed numbers or what? I haven’t seen any pics up close of the new jerseys, so I can’t say. I saw the jerseys last year at the All-Star Game and they looked like they were twill.

  • Stuby | February 15, 2007 at 3:18 pm |

    [quote comment="55190"]Athletes Who Have Worn No. 13:

    NFL
    Danny Kanell – Atlanta
    Kurt Warner – St. Louis

    NHL
    Bill Guerin – Boston
    Valeri Kamensky – NY Rangers
    Slava Kozlov – Detroit
    German Titov – Anaheim
    Alexei Zhamnov – Chicago

    MLB
    Edgardo Alfonzo – NY Mets
    Adrian Brown – Pittsburgh
    Jeff D’Amico – Milwaukee
    Omar Vizquel – Cleveland
    Alex Rodriguez – NY Yankees[/quote]

    Has anyone mentioned Wilt Chamberlain yet?

  • Greg Riffenburgh | February 15, 2007 at 3:19 pm |

    Hey Paul,

    In the column, you mentioned that the tongue flap is uniquely baseball. Sorry to burst your bubble, but soccer has been doing it just as long.

    Here are some modern examples:
    Adidas: Copa line, Predator line, (Beckham has his own unique style)
    Nike: Ronaldinho’s signature shoe, Tiempo line, and more
    Others:

    Also, remember that a lot of those laces that you mentioned in the football & basketball section of the column are colored (red, orange, etc) the way they are because of the design of the shoe, not because of the player’s personal taste or alteration.

  • lockbull | February 15, 2007 at 3:28 pm |

    Athletes Who Have Worn No. 13:

    NFL
    Danny Kanell – Atlanta

    Danny Kanell’s father, Dan Kanell, M.D. was (and still is) the team doctor for the Miami Dolphins, so he wore # 13 in honor of Dan Marino.

  • patrick | February 15, 2007 at 3:38 pm |

    [quote comment="55372"]Hey Paul,

    In the column, you mentioned that the tongue flap is uniquely baseball. Sorry to burst your bubble, but soccer has been doing it just as long.

    Here are some modern examples:
    Adidas: Copa line, Predator line, (Beckham has his own unique style)
    Nike: Ronaldinho’s signature shoe, Tiempo line, and more
    Others:

    These show the off center lacing really well, particularly the nikes. I ahve ot say from personal experience, it really does work. Theres nothing worse than hitting a ball solid and have your shoe lace knot have it sail wide/high

  • Anthony Verna | February 15, 2007 at 3:40 pm |

    Philly Bill, are you sure you’re not thinking of these alt blues?

    http://www.baseballh...

  • Jill | February 15, 2007 at 3:42 pm |

    [quote comment="55366"]I hate to be that guy…but it’s starting to annoy me that a bunch of people are “reporting” on certain teams new bp caps when we’ve know about them for months and how they look. You can see them all on the New Era web site, they have been up for awhile.
    Here is the Mariners cap that was requested.

    I apoligize for my hostility[/quote]

    It irriates me too. Nothing like hearing the same old news over and over again. That said, to me it is much more horrendous to see the caps on the players instead of just a picture of the hat. I haven’t found one picture of a player wearing one of the new hats that doesn’t make me cringe. Yet I can’t stop browsing spring training pics just to catch a glimpse of those ugly caps.

  • hotrodd | February 15, 2007 at 3:44 pm |

    [quote comment="55367"]Also, Dan Marino and Tim Rattay.

    [quote comment="55190"]Athletes Who Have Worn No. 13:

    NFL
    Danny Kanell – Atlanta
    Kurt Warner – St. Louis

    NHL
    Bill Guerin – Boston
    Valeri Kamensky – NY Rangers
    Slava Kozlov – Detroit
    German Titov – Anaheim
    Alexei Zhamnov – Chicago

    MLB
    Edgardo Alfonzo – NY Mets
    Adrian Brown – Pittsburgh
    Jeff D’Amico – Milwaukee
    Omar Vizquel – Cleveland
    Alex Rodriguez – NY Yankees[/quote][/quote]

    and thats the last time Rattay and Marino will ever be in the same sentence…
    (besides this one)

  • Greg Riffenburgh | February 15, 2007 at 3:45 pm |

    Yeah, I am also a firm believer in off-center lacing, particularly Nike’s Total 90 line.

    Adidas has also done some more unorthodox methods with their F50+ line.

  • Joe Hilseberg | February 15, 2007 at 3:53 pm |

    [quote comment="55370"]RE: The new BP jerseys

    Does that mean they are scrapping the twill numbers in favor of the heat pressed numbers or what? I haven’t seen any pics up close of the new jerseys, so I can’t say. I saw the jerseys last year at the All-Star Game and they looked like they were twill.[/quote]

    Twill has a tendency to warp after several washes if the jersey it’s applied to is not a quailty garment…it will lose the grip of the adhesive backing and will misshape. The heat press will flatten the twill out, restore any of the adhesive properties, and make the number look new.

  • schuby | February 15, 2007 at 3:55 pm |

    Why does the Rangers jersey have red striping in this picture of Jose Canseco? And you can see the giant reebok logo on the wristband. Large logo creeping in ’94.

  • Seth H | February 15, 2007 at 3:55 pm |

    Once upon a time they would schedule both games at night and you only had to pay for one ticket to see both games.

    They even had a special punny name for it, at least here in New York: A “twi-night” doubleheader.

  • Joe Hilseberg | February 15, 2007 at 4:01 pm |

    [quote comment="55383"]Why does the Rangers jersey have red striping in this picture of Jose Canseco? And you can see the giant reebok logo on the wristband. Large logo creeping in ’94.[/quote]

    Because that’s how they were in 94…

    Dressed to the Nines: A History of the Baseball Uniform

    It’s a free and great resource….and well known to UW readers.

  • Sir Jock Strap | February 15, 2007 at 4:01 pm |

    Soccer, Futbol, Leg Hockey … whatever.

    Yes. I know, as does everyone else, that soccer is fuggin huge worldwide, but so is techno-pop.

    However, over here, it’s akin to Dungeons and Dragons. Passion for a small percentage, hobby for a few, odd curiosity for a some, but pretty dorky for most.

    Don’t get me wrong, it’s very impressive when watching it in a pub in England. I even have a favorite team … Liverpool. Every four years, it’s fun to watch the rest of the world go batshit. When in Rome … great.

    I find it amuzing when a soccer fan posts a “hey over here! don’t forget about us!” posting. It reminds me of a dialogue between Lovejoy and Apu.

    “What about Hindus? There are 300 million of us, you know.”

    “That’s just super.”

    BTW. Favorite Techno-pop artist …

    http://www.youtube.c...

  • Joe Hilseberg | February 15, 2007 at 4:07 pm |

    First view of the new BP jersey at O’s spring training…hate the white sides!

  • Sir Jock Strap | February 15, 2007 at 4:09 pm |

    [quote comment="55379"][quote comment="55367"]Also, Dan Marino and Tim Rattay.

    [quote comment="55190"]Athletes Who Have Worn No. 13:

    NFL
    Danny Kanell – Atlanta
    Kurt Warner – St. Louis

    NHL
    Bill Guerin – Boston
    Valeri Kamensky – NY Rangers
    Slava Kozlov – Detroit
    German Titov – Anaheim
    Alexei Zhamnov – Chicago

    MLB
    Edgardo Alfonzo – NY Mets
    Adrian Brown – Pittsburgh
    Jeff D’Amico – Milwaukee
    Omar Vizquel – Cleveland
    Alex Rodriguez – NY Yankees[/quote][/quote]

    and thats the last time Rattay and Marino will ever be in the same sentence…
    (besides this one)[/quote]

    Dan Marino and Tim Rattay both quarterbacked in the state of Florida. Tim Rattay and Dan Marino never wone a Super Bowl. Could it be because of the number Dan Marino and Tim Rattay used to wear? I’m sure Tim Rattay and Dan Marino would disagree. If Tim Rattay was in danger of getting frost bitten, do you think Dan Marino would hook him up with a pair of Isotoners?

  • GJP | February 15, 2007 at 4:21 pm |

    Re: Post 81

    Brent Johnson labels his goal sticks with the number 12 because Red Wings Hall of Famer Sid Abel (who wore 12) is his grandfather.

    Johnson also has the number 12 on his goalie mask.

  • S Bennett | February 15, 2007 at 4:24 pm |

    A few notes:

    Graf is actually a Swiss company, not German.

    I know a few guys who use metal aglets on their laces because it’s such a pain in the ass to lace skates when the aglets break down.

    Football…errr soccer boots have enjoyed a number of advances over the years, from the tongue flap, to offset laces,to total covers for your laces (this one opens like a cellar door – fastened with velcro. These ones connect at the bottom, like having an outer tongue) to no laces at all

    This guy tackling Maradona provides an example of tying laces around your leg. Seemed a much more popular thing in the 70′s

    today, if you want to waste your money, you ca buy this garbage.

    I apoligize for my hostility[/quote]

    It irriates me too. Nothing like hearing the same old news over and over again.

    No worries guys. By the way, has anyone seen these yet?

  • BurghFan | February 15, 2007 at 4:28 pm |

    Since I was thinking of how much the Blackhawks uniforms reminded me of better players while watching them last night, I didn’t see this until it was too late to post.

    Metsfan AZ said:

    …”Authtentic” stuff is realtively new for fans to wear. I love looking at the pre 60′s pics and seeing everyone wearing jackets and ties with fedoras. As opposed to today with more “artistic” interpretations of the home teams unis that you ever thought existed. Nothing is more lame though than wearing an authentic jersey that you had personalized with your name. I mean, do you think you might be mistaken for a former player with your 42 inch chest and 48 inch waist? Or maybe they might ask you to pinch hit for one of the Mets that tears a calf muscle? I also hate when someone wears a jersey of a team that’s not playing. Phew, I feel much better now.

    Jackets and ties are before my time, but I certainly remember when people didn’t wear team jerseys to games, in large part because they weren’t easily available. Obviously, times have changed, which is fine, but you do raise a couple of questions.

    -How is wearing a jersey with a player’s name on it better than wearing one with your name on it? Is showing your love for the player an improvement over showing your love for the team?

    -Is wearing a cap of a team that’s not playing OK? What if it’s a team from a different sport?

  • BurghFan | February 15, 2007 at 4:35 pm |

    The Charlie Feeney who Dock Ellis was quoted as talking to was probably the Post-Gazette beat writer, not the NL president.

  • Joe Hilseberg | February 15, 2007 at 4:37 pm |

    [quote comment="55396"]Nothing is more lame though than wearing an authentic jersey that you had personalized with your name. I mean, do you think you might be mistaken for a former player with your 42 inch chest and 48 inch waist? Or maybe they might ask you to pinch hit for one of the Mets that tears a calf muscle?[/quote]

    This is the first I’m seeing of this comment, and it is just terrible. Most guys I know grew up dreaming of being a major league player. Getting a game jersey with your name on it is just a little part of that dream…if I can’t play where they play, at least I can wear what they wear sort of thing. Would you prefer fans only have cheap replicas with their own name?

    So I am standing up and saying that if you think that there is nothing more lame than wearing an authentic jersey that you had personalized with your name, then I am now CAPTAIN LAME! I have about 10 of them, and I will defend my fellow lame-o’s.

  • Joey Guns | February 15, 2007 at 4:38 pm |

    [quote comment="55389"]First view of the new BP jersey at O’s spring training…hate the white sides![/quote]

    That “34 Benson” jersey won’t be getting much use this season! Oh well. How’s his hot wife going to get attention if he’s never going to be on the mound all year? Somehow, I’m sure she’ll find a way……

  • Metsfan AZ | February 15, 2007 at 4:45 pm |

    [quote comment="55396"]Since I was thinking of how much the Blackhawks uniforms reminded me of better players while watching them last night, I didn’t see this until it was too late to post.

    Metsfan AZ said:

    …”Authtentic” stuff is realtively new for fans to wear. I love looking at the pre 60′s pics and seeing everyone wearing jackets and ties with fedoras. As opposed to today with more “artistic” interpretations of the home teams unis that you ever thought existed. Nothing is more lame though than wearing an authentic jersey that you had personalized with your name. I mean, do you think you might be mistaken for a former player with your 42 inch chest and 48 inch waist? Or maybe they might ask you to pinch hit for one of the Mets that tears a calf muscle? I also hate when someone wears a jersey of a team that’s not playing. Phew, I feel much better now.

    Jackets and ties are before my time, but I certainly remember when people didn’t wear team jerseys to games, in large part because they weren’t easily available. Obviously, times have changed, which is fine, but you do raise a couple of questions.

    -How is wearing a jersey with a player’s name on it better than wearing one with your name on it? Is showing your love for the player an improvement over showing your love for the team?

    -Is wearing a cap of a team that’s not playing OK? What if it’s a team from a different sport?[/quote]
    I guess my point is that the player has an obvious connection to a team whereas your name does not. He plays for them – you don’t. I think we all have our favorite players and that’s why we buy & wear their jerseys. I assume part of your point is that “I’m a fan of this team and since the players come and go I’m putting my name on the jersey”
    I don’t mind the different sport cap I guess. Same for college teams at a pro game or vice versa. But a Jets jersey at Shea is kind of lame, even if they used to play there.

  • Eric | February 15, 2007 at 4:49 pm |

    [quote comment="55401"][quote comment="55396"]Nothing is more lame though than wearing an authentic jersey that you had personalized with your name. I mean, do you think you might be mistaken for a former player with your 42 inch chest and 48 inch waist? Or maybe they might ask you to pinch hit for one of the Mets that tears a calf muscle?[/quote]

    This is the first I’m seeing of this comment, and it is just terrible. Most guys I know grew up dreaming of being a major league player. Getting a game jersey with your name on it is just a little part of that dream…if I can’t play where they play, at least I can wear what they wear sort of thing. Would you prefer fans only have cheap replicas with their own name?

    So I am standing up and saying that if you think that there is nothing more lame than wearing an authentic jersey that you had personalized with your name, then I am now CAPTAIN LAME! I have about 10 of them, and I will defend my fellow lame-o’s.[/quote]

    Let’s face it: a grown man wearing a team jersey when they aren’t a pro athlete (or a hip hop star) is by it’s very nature – LAME. We all do it. Do we have to be hatin’ on those who put their own name on the back? I think not.

  • Metsfan AZ | February 15, 2007 at 4:52 pm |

    [quote comment="55401"][quote comment="55396"]Nothing is more lame though than wearing an authentic jersey that you had personalized with your name. I mean, do you think you might be mistaken for a former player with your 42 inch chest and 48 inch waist? Or maybe they might ask you to pinch hit for one of the Mets that tears a calf muscle?[/quote]

    This is the first I’m seeing of this comment, and it is just terrible. Most guys I know grew up dreaming of being a major league player. Getting a game jersey with your name on it is just a little part of that dream…if I can’t play where they play, at least I can wear what they wear sort of thing. Would you prefer fans only have cheap replicas with their own name?

    So I am standing up and saying that if you think that there is nothing more lame than wearing an authentic jersey that you had personalized with your name, then I am now CAPTAIN LAME! I have about 10 of them, and I will defend my fellow lame-o’s.[/quote]
    No, I would prefer that fans not have their name on an MLB jersey period, authentic or replica. Looks like we have an “agree to disagree” thing going on Captain. ;)

  • Marty Met | February 15, 2007 at 4:52 pm |

    [quote comment="55405"][quote comment="55396"]Since I was thinking of how much the Blackhawks uniforms reminded me of better players while watching them last night, I didn’t see this until it was too late to post.

    Metsfan AZ said:

    …”Authtentic” stuff is realtively new for fans to wear. I love looking at the pre 60′s pics and seeing everyone wearing jackets and ties with fedoras. As opposed to today with more “artistic” interpretations of the home teams unis that you ever thought existed. Nothing is more lame though than wearing an authentic jersey that you had personalized with your name. I mean, do you think you might be mistaken for a former player with your 42 inch chest and 48 inch waist? Or maybe they might ask you to pinch hit for one of the Mets that tears a calf muscle? I also hate when someone wears a jersey of a team that’s not playing. Phew, I feel much better now.

    Jackets and ties are before my time, but I certainly remember when people didn’t wear team jerseys to games, in large part because they weren’t easily available. Obviously, times have changed, which is fine, but you do raise a couple of questions.

    -How is wearing a jersey with a player’s name on it better than wearing one with your name on it? Is showing your love for the player an improvement over showing your love for the team?

    -Is wearing a cap of a team that’s not playing OK? What if it’s a team from a different sport?[/quote]
    I guess my point is that the player has an obvious connection to a team whereas your name does not. He plays for them – you don’t. I think we all have our favorite players and that’s why we buy & wear their jerseys. I assume part of your point is that “I’m a fan of this team and since the players come and go I’m putting my name on the jersey”
    I don’t mind the different sport cap I guess. Same for college teams at a pro game or vice versa. But a Jets jersey at Shea is kind of lame, even if they used to play there.[/quote]

    I wear an authentic red Devils sweater with tackle twill #1 to the hockey games and an authentic 1969 grey Mets jersey #41 to the baseball games, NEITHER OF THEM HAS A NAME ON THE BACK.

  • Joe Hilseberg | February 15, 2007 at 4:57 pm |

    [quote comment="55412"]No, I would prefer that fans not have their name on an MLB jersey period, authentic or replica. Looks like we have an “agree to disagree” thing going on Captain. ;)[/quote]

    Fair enough. Captain Lame has spoken! haha

  • Metsfan AZ | February 15, 2007 at 5:00 pm |

    [quote comment="55413"][quote comment="55405"][quote comment="55396"]

    I wear an authentic red Devils sweater with tackle twill #1 to the hockey games and an authentic 1969 grey Mets jersey #41 to the baseball games, NEITHER OF THEM HAS A NAME ON THE BACK.[/quote]
    Just to make a weak point. What if “my number” in HS was 41? So I get a Mets jersey with 41 and “Otero” on it. Will anyone at Shea or any other ballpark not pelt me with beer? I know I’m using the most iconic Mets number but do you kind of see where I’m coming from? I kind of veered off, I know…

  • TonyE | February 15, 2007 at 5:06 pm |

    Superstitions? Think Notre Dame football.

    Green ND uniforms-Dan Devine/Montana 1977.
    Touchdown Jesus.
    Leprechaun logo and mascot.
    Golden Domers.
    Four Horsemen.

    Start there.

    Something also probably happened during the Lakers 33-game winning streak with West, Chamberlain, Baylor, Goodrich and Hairston too…

  • schuby | February 15, 2007 at 5:07 pm |

    [quote comment="55385"][quote comment="55383"]Why does the Rangers jersey have red striping in this picture of Jose Canseco? And you can see the giant reebok logo on the wristband. Large logo creeping in ’94.[/quote]

    Because that’s how they were in 94…

    Dressed to the Nines: A History of the Baseball Uniform

    It’s a free and great resource….and well known to UW readers.[/quote]

    Thanks, i forgot about that site. But why was the main color blue since ’72 and then make the switch to red for no reason, and then switch back again. Seems strange.

  • Stuby | February 15, 2007 at 5:10 pm |

    In the mid-90′s, I had one of those T-shirts with the SF Giants lettering on the front and #6 and the name ‘Thompson’ (for second baseman Robby Thompson) on the back. He was my favorite player and I didn’t have the dough for a real jersey. Kind of lame, I know.

    After JT Snow came to the Giants and started wearing #6 and the Giants moved into U-Name-It Park, I continued to wear that T-Shirt to games in honor of my now-departed favorite player. I got quite a few comments from the lame-o ‘new’ Giants fans like “Who’s Thompson? JT Snow wears #6″.

    My question to you all: Is it OK to wear something like that, or a jersey with the player’s name/number after said player has left the team?

  • Stuby | February 15, 2007 at 5:12 pm |

    [quote comment="55426"][quote comment="55385"][quote comment="55383"]Why does the Rangers jersey have red striping in this picture of Jose Canseco? And you can see the giant reebok logo on the wristband. Large logo creeping in ’94.[/quote]

    Because that’s how they were in 94…

    Dressed to the Nines: A History of the Baseball Uniform

    It’s a free and great resource….and well known to UW readers.[/quote]

    Thanks, i forgot about that site. But why was the main color blue since ’72 and then make the switch to red for no reason, and then switch back again. Seems strange.[/quote]
    Its about moving the merchandise.

  • Barney Fife | February 15, 2007 at 5:13 pm |

    The Hornets didn’t wear “new” red uniforms last night. They were a one-time, Valentine’s Day promotion in support of heart disease research. The uniforms are being auctioned online today for a heart charity.

    [quote comment="55193"]Wow I hadn’t heard about those Hornets Jerseys. I find it amazing that they say Oklahoma City on them. With all the speculation that the NBA will move the Sonics there I find it intriguing that they have those. Or it may mean nothing just a way to honor the city for being such a good substitute home.[/quote]

    This person is correct. Simply thanking a great city for being a great host. You’ll never see these unis again.

    [quote comment="55310"]
    Kruk was on Letterman in the middle of the season shredding the blue caps because, yes, they lost all the games they played in the blue caps.[/quote]

    It was Leno.

  • CollinJ | February 15, 2007 at 5:14 pm |

    On the subject of shoelaces from the ESPN column, I think it is interesting to point out that my hometown of Portsmouth, Ohio is home to the largest shoelace manufacturer in the world. Mitchellace. I’m not sure if they make any of the laces for pro sports teams though.

    The photos of George Clooney also reminded me that Portsmouth is the original home of the Detroit Lions. Before they were the Lions, they were the Portsmouth Spartans. Very great history, tying Green Bay who pansied out and wouldn’t play a championship game, look for the iron man game. Portsmouth also was home to the first NFL night game, and the stadium is still used today as Portsmouth High School‘s home stadium. One last interesting fact is that the Portsmouth Spartans played in the first ever NFL championship game, playoff game, and indoor game, which all came against the Chicago Bears. This game also led to the evolution of the forward pass as we know it.

  • Greg Riffenburgh | February 15, 2007 at 5:18 pm |

    Would you prefer fans only have cheap replicas with their own name?

    No, please God NO! Replicas (esp football) look horrible because they nowhere near replicate the look of the jersey on the field. I mean do you really think that LaDainian Tomlinson would play in a piece of crap like this? No, and here’s why 1) it’s made by Reebok, 2) the sleeves and torso are so long and baggy that if he got within 4 ft of a tackler, he might as well give up because he’s as good as grabbed and 3) it looks NOTHING like what his teammates wear!

    So for the sake of all of us, if you’re gonna wear a football jersey, wear it like a football player does, not a rapper. Otherwise, you should just wear a t-shirt or jacket or something. And that goes for all sports. (Hockey and baseball fans catch a break here)

  • Greg Riffenburgh | February 15, 2007 at 5:27 pm |

    [quote comment="55427"]In the mid-90′s, I had one of those T-shirts with the SF Giants lettering on the front and #6 and the name ‘Thompson’ (for second baseman Robby Thompson) on the back. He was my favorite player and I didn’t have the dough for a real jersey. Kind of lame, I know.

    After JT Snow came to the Giants and started wearing #6 and the Giants moved into U-Name-It Park, I continued to wear that T-Shirt to games in honor of my now-departed favorite player. I got quite a few comments from the lame-o ‘new’ Giants fans like “Who’s Thompson? JT Snow wears #6″.

    My question to you all: Is it OK to wear something like that, or a jersey with the player’s name/number after said player has left the team?[/quote]

    That’s the frustrating thing about buying jerseys with names is that the name rarely sticks around. That’s why Dodgers, Yankees, and many college jerseys are wonderful, they never get out of date.

    I don’t know if there’s really anything you can do about that though. Maybe make sure he is an iconic player regardless of team (for exapmle Reggie Jackson or Nolan Ryan).

    And about wearing other teams stuff to the park when neither team is the one you’re wearing, that’s kinda dumb. Like wearing Cincinnati garb to a Dodgers-Padres game (I’ve seen it happen). Just wear something neutral. Otherwise, I’m thinkin’ why are you here if you want to see some other team play?

  • keek80 | February 15, 2007 at 5:34 pm |

    [quote comment="55303"]Not a wooden stick in the bunch — all composite. The #12-label goalie sticks at far left reportedly belong to Brent Johnson, who wears #1. Recent call-up Eric Fehr (#14) uses some pretty long sticks. And look at all the tape on the butt-ends of Chris Clarks’s sticks. Is that even legal?

    As for uni superstitions, I recall the Phillies wearing caps like this on Sundays for one season, losing virtually every Sunday game, then abruptly discontinuing the practice. (At least they didn’t wear these.) They still have this alternate cap, which I believe is used for interleague games. (The BP caps are yet another style, with a blue “P”.)

    In searching for Phillies images, it’s horrifying how many of them are some variation of this train wreck — yet another called third strike! Maybe I’m not looking forward to baseball season after all…[/quote]

    What is with these dumbass patterned hats? They are the ugliest things ever. Who in their right mind would wear those hideous things? Oh and take the hat size sticker off your hat, that makes them look even dumber.

  • specs | February 15, 2007 at 5:34 pm |

    On the topic of names on your jersey, I like the idea of having someone’s name who is no longer on the team. Everyone in Chicago has an Urlacher jersey, but how many people have a Curtis Enis or Rashaan Salaam jersey? It would be super funny to have a jersey like that to wear to games, if for no other reason than the fact that most people take themselves WAY too seriously, and it would make them mad.

  • specs | February 15, 2007 at 5:38 pm |

    Also, I don’t see why its a problem to wear a hat/jersey of a non-playing team to a game. Some people enjoy thr sport as a whole, and thus enjoy taking in a game without needing to cheer for one team or the other. I think this is especially true in baseball, as people like to go to different ballparks to see each one’s individual characteristics.

  • S Bennett | February 15, 2007 at 5:42 pm |

    My question to you all: Is it OK to wear something like that, or a jersey with the player’s name/number after said player has left the team?[/quote]

    Absolutely! I only have two seaters – a Mike Bossy #22 and a Bobby Nystrom #23. I’m not interested at all in wearing a current player’s name on my back. At 35, it seems a little off the mark (to me – I’m not passing judgement on anyone else) to worship 18 year old boys. I support my teams, have favourite players, but if I were to get a new numbered shirt, I’d get my favourite number and no nameplate.

    I see wearing uns as more of a thing I did as a kid, so I guess I have a thing for entirely revisiting my childhood if I’m going to wear one. After all, as I write this, I’m wearing a Ned’s Atomic Dustbin t-shirt.

    Oldies are great.

  • Stuby | February 15, 2007 at 5:45 pm |

    [quote comment="55443"]On the topic of names on your jersey, I like the idea of having someone’s name who is no longer on the team. Everyone in Chicago has an Urlacher jersey, but how many people have a Curtis Enis or Rashaan Salaam jersey? It would be super funny to have a jersey like that to wear to games, if for no other reason than the fact that most people take themselves WAY too seriously, and it would make them mad.[/quote]
    Exactly. I’d love to have a Darryl Strawberry #17 Giants jersey from ’94.

  • Teebz | February 15, 2007 at 5:46 pm |

    [quote comment="55427"]
    My question to you all: Is it OK to wear something like that, or a jersey with the player’s name/number after said player has left the team?[/quote]

    It’s more than ok. Why? Because that player was a soldier in the army taking the field just as the next player to wear the same number. All of my hockey jerseys have former players on them. People still recognize the jersey, even if they don’t recognize the team. I simply inform them of the player’s greatness when he wore the jersey.

    NY Islanders Fisherman – Kasparaitis
    NHL All-Star – Selanne w/Jets patches from the Boston Game
    Pittsburgh Penguins – Lemieux
    Chicago Blackhawks – Amonte

    I’m not gonna list them all, but that’s a sample.

  • Teebz | February 15, 2007 at 5:49 pm |

    [quote comment="55450"]…even if they don’t recognize the team.[/quote]

    Recognize the player! Dammit!

  • Chili | February 15, 2007 at 5:53 pm |

    I agree that Peyton Manning didn’t say anything about luck when he was talking to Dave about changing his uniform. He was just trying to fill up the extra time at halftime. I was hoping he’d have his MVP trophy with him or a jersey for Dave because he’s such a huge Colts fan.

  • schuby | February 15, 2007 at 6:14 pm |

    [quote comment="55435"]Would you prefer fans only have cheap replicas with their own name?

    No, please God NO! Replicas (esp football) look horrible because they nowhere near replicate the look of the jersey on the field. I mean do you really think that LaDainian Tomlinson would play in a piece of crap like this? No, and here’s why 1) it’s made by Reebok, 2) the sleeves and torso are so long and baggy that if he got within 4 ft of a tackler, he might as well give up because he’s as good as grabbed and 3) it looks NOTHING like what his teammates wear!

    So for the sake of all of us, if you’re gonna wear a football jersey, wear it like a football player does, not a rapper. Otherwise, you should just wear a t-shirt or jacket or something. And that goes for all sports. (Hockey and baseball fans catch a break here)[/quote]

    What about the unlucky few of us that don’t have the cash to dish out for an authentic jersey? They cost a ton nowadays.

  • TonyE | February 15, 2007 at 6:19 pm |

    On the topic of names on your jersey, I like the idea of having someone’s name who is no longer on the team. Everyone in Chicago has an Urlacher jersey, but how many people have a Curtis Enis or Rashaan Salaam jersey? It would be super funny to have a jersey like that to wear to games, if for no other reason than the fact that most people take themselves WAY too seriously, and it would make them mad.

    Exactly. I’d love to have a Darryl Strawberry #17 Giants jersey from ‘94.

    When you’re paying $200 a pop for an authentic jersey that costs $13 to make in China, you’d better have some friggin’ long player name in a juicy 3-layer tackle twill on the back.

  • brett | February 15, 2007 at 6:21 pm |

    No photo evidence, but I can remember a year or two ago, when Paul Lo Duca was a Marlin, he had the team pull up their socks, so everyone was showing a little sock. They were in the midst of a long losing streak, but after that won maybe 5 in a row?

  • ACC (the Brain) | February 15, 2007 at 6:36 pm |

    [quote comment="55440"][quote comment="55427"]In the mid-90′s, I had one of those T-shirts with the SF Giants lettering on the front and #6 and the name ‘Thompson’ (for second baseman Robby Thompson) on the back. He was my favorite player and I didn’t have the dough for a real jersey. Kind of lame, I know.

    After JT Snow came to the Giants and started wearing #6 and the Giants moved into U-Name-It Park, I continued to wear that T-Shirt to games in honor of my now-departed favorite player. I got quite a few comments from the lame-o ‘new’ Giants fans like “Who’s Thompson? JT Snow wears #6″.

    My question to you all: Is it OK to wear something like that, or a jersey with the player’s name/number after said player has left the team?[/quote]

    That’s the frustrating thing about buying jerseys with names is that the name rarely sticks around. That’s why Dodgers, Yankees, and many college jerseys are wonderful, they never get out of date.

    I don’t know if there’s really anything you can do about that though. Maybe make sure he is an iconic player regardless of team (for exapmle Reggie Jackson or Nolan Ryan).

    And about wearing other teams stuff to the park when neither team is the one you’re wearing, that’s kinda dumb. Like wearing Cincinnati garb to a Dodgers-Padres game (I’ve seen it happen). Just wear something neutral. Otherwise, I’m thinkin’ why are you here if you want to see some other team play?[/quote]

    No the problem is not the jersey or the player – it’s the fans who don’t know history. Wearing a retired legend’s or even a fan favorite’s jersey is cool especially with the name on the back.

  • john | February 15, 2007 at 6:39 pm |

    Freshman year of high school I had the Nike Air Money 96′s in black/white. I thought they were fucking badass……because I was 15 and a retard.

    I proudly wear my jerseys of former Islanders Tommy Salo (home white) and Dave Scatchard (orange third). I don’t care if they sucked as Isles, they were my favorite players on my favorite team and I’ll defend them to the end.

  • Billy B. | February 15, 2007 at 7:24 pm |

    [quote comment="55405"][quote comment="55396"]Since I was thinking of how much the Blackhawks uniforms reminded me of better players while watching them last night, I didn’t see this until it was too late to post.

    Metsfan AZ said:

    …”Authtentic” stuff is realtively new for fans to wear. I love looking at the pre 60′s pics and seeing everyone wearing jackets and ties with fedoras. As opposed to today with more “artistic” interpretations of the home teams unis that you ever thought existed. Nothing is more lame though than wearing an authentic jersey that you had personalized with your name. I mean, do you think you might be mistaken for a former player with your 42 inch chest and 48 inch waist? Or maybe they might ask you to pinch hit for one of the Mets that tears a calf muscle? I also hate when someone wears a jersey of a team that’s not playing. Phew, I feel much better now.

    Jackets and ties are before my time, but I certainly remember when people didn’t wear team jerseys to games, in large part because they weren’t easily available. Obviously, times have changed, which is fine, but you do raise a couple of questions.

    -How is wearing a jersey with a player’s name on it better than wearing one with your name on it? Is showing your love for the player an improvement over showing your love for the team?

    -Is wearing a cap of a team that’s not playing OK? What if it’s a team from a different sport?[/quote]
    I guess my point is that the player has an obvious connection to a team whereas your name does not. He plays for them – you don’t. I think we all have our favorite players and that’s why we buy & wear their jerseys. I assume part of your point is that “I’m a fan of this team and since the players come and go I’m putting my name on the jersey”
    I don’t mind the different sport cap I guess. Same for college teams at a pro game or vice versa. But a Jets jersey at Shea is kind of lame, even if they used to play there.[/quote]
    I hate it when I’m at a Cubs/Sox game and someone is wearing a Bears jersey. Just wear normal clothes if you don’t care who wins, but don’t wear a football jersey.

  • Lou | February 15, 2007 at 7:46 pm |

    padon me if someone else pointed this out already, but I do not have time to read all of the comments.

    Joe Montana actually wore the same jersey in Super Bowls XVI and XXIV. His wife packed the old jersey in his suitcase for good luck. I never heard about about him doing it in XIX and XXIII. So perhaps we are both correct, or perhaps Paul has his Super Bowls confused.

  • S Bennett | February 15, 2007 at 7:50 pm |

    I proudly wear my jerseys of former Islanders Tommy Salo (home white) and Dave Scatchard (orange third). I don’t care if they sucked as Isles, they were my favorite players on my favorite team and I’ll defend them to the end.[/quote]

    You’ll defend Tommy Salo? That IS hardcore. Just don’t make him cry.

  • DRob8785 | February 15, 2007 at 8:15 pm |

    [quote comment="55432"]
    This person is correct. Simply thanking a great city for being a great host. You’ll never see these unis again.
    [/quote]

    Just a few more games before the Hornets return to their rightful home.

  • Ron | February 15, 2007 at 8:35 pm |

    Actually, I think you have the Super Bowls mixed up, Joe Montana wore the same red jersey in SB 19 vs. the Dolphins and SB 23 vs. the Bengals.

    [quote comment="55507"]padon me if someone else pointed this out already, but I do not have time to read all of the comments.

    Joe Montana actually wore the same jersey in Super Bowls XVI and XXIV. His wife packed the old jersey in his suitcase for good luck. I never heard about about him doing it in XIX and XXIII. So perhaps we are both correct, or perhaps Paul has his Super Bowls confused.[/quote]

  • Daniel | February 15, 2007 at 9:01 pm |

    On a side note, one of my most prized baseball possesions is a Dock Ellis signed ball where he wrote the date of his LSD no-no on it. It’s incredible.

  • john | February 15, 2007 at 9:06 pm |

    [quote comment="55508"]I proudly wear my jerseys of former Islanders Tommy Salo (home white) and Dave Scatchard (orange third). I don’t care if they sucked as Isles, they were my favorite players on my favorite team and I’ll defend them to the end.[/quote]

    You’ll defend Tommy Salo? That IS hardcore. Just don’t make him cry.[/quote]

    Mike Milbury’s Mardi Gras float-sized head makes me cry.

    (why is everything italicized?)

  • Andy from KC | February 15, 2007 at 9:10 pm |

    76ers’ red unis = good.

    Hornets’ red unis = good … GOD!

  • dgc | February 15, 2007 at 9:28 pm |

    During the 2nd intermission of the Caps’ game, they had a feature on which jerseys the Caps thought were ugly. There was a wide range of views, but some major hate for the mustard Nashville alternate.

  • Robert | February 15, 2007 at 9:40 pm |

    [quote comment="55426"][quote comment="55385"][quote comment="55383"]Why does the Rangers jersey have red striping in this picture of Jose Canseco? And you can see the giant reebok logo on the wristband. Large logo creeping in ’94.[/quote]

    Because that’s how they were in 94…

    Dressed to the Nines: A History of the Baseball Uniform

    It’s a free and great resource….and well known to UW readers.[/quote]

    Thanks, i forgot about that site. But why was the main color blue since ’72 and then make the switch to red for no reason, and then switch back again. Seems strange.[/quote]

    The Rangers changed their colors and uniform style in 1994 to coincide with their move into a new ballpark. Out with the old, losing ways, and in with the new. It worked, since they make their only playoff appearances in those uniforms.

    I don’t recall why they switched back to blue. I do know, however, that their winning ways (relatively speaking) ceased as soon as they began wearing blue again. Also, the majority of the Rangers fans (all thirteen of them) preferred the red-trimmed uniforms.

  • Allison | February 15, 2007 at 9:53 pm |

    Sorry if it’s been mentioned…

    Is that a Dominican flag on Pujols’ tongue flap?

  • Matt B | February 15, 2007 at 9:58 pm |

    I hate it when I’m at a Cubs/Sox game and someone is wearing a Bears jersey.

    Even worse: Packers gear at a Badger game. When the vast majority of the crowd is sporting red or white (maybe neutral black if it’s cold) there are always the idiots sticking out in green and yellow. Makes me want to pull my hair out. I’ll even give the blaze orange knuckleheads a pass, but not the Packers stuff…uggh.

  • S Bennett | February 15, 2007 at 9:59 pm |

    You’ll defend Tommy Salo? That IS hardcore. Just don’t make him cry.[/quote]

    Mike Milbury’s Mardi Gras float-sized head makes me cry.

    (why is everything italicized?)[/quote]

    As soon as you mention the GM for life, everything gets skewed.

  • My Name is Not Earl | February 15, 2007 at 10:13 pm |

    Didn’t Elgin Baylor retire just before the Lakers went on their 33-game winning streak?

  • J at The Dundies | February 15, 2007 at 11:07 pm |

    [quote comment="55531"]I hate it when I’m at a Cubs/Sox game and someone is wearing a Bears jersey.

    Even worse: Packers gear at a Badger game. When the vast majority of the crowd is sporting red or white (maybe neutral black if it’s cold) there are always the idiots sticking out in green and yellow. Makes me want to pull my hair out. I’ll even give the blaze orange knuckleheads a pass, but not the Packers stuff…uggh.[/quote]

    At Michigan football games, I often see people sporting gear from colleges other than Michigan and their opponent. That one always confuses me.

  • =bg= | February 15, 2007 at 11:18 pm |

    Anyone seen new Giants Zito 75 shirts?

  • Jeff | February 15, 2007 at 11:30 pm |

    [quote comment="55152"]that third Ovie stick looks like he drew some naughty bits between the legs.

    Third leg indeed.[/quote]

    Speaking of naughty bits and players, uh, equipment …

    Way back in the stone age, (it was 1983, I think) Brewers pitcher Pete Vuckovich drew the finger, the bird, what have you, on the back side of his glove (in the HoldSter area if it was Rawlings).

    We never noticed it on the slide when we chose that photo to run big in the paper. We sure noticed once the press started running and the paper came up to the newsroom.

    Only time I ever got to say “Stop the presses” while we etched out the hilarious/potentially offensive drawing. ‘Twas no Photoshop at the time.

  • Lake | February 15, 2007 at 11:31 pm |

    If I ever owned a baseball team, I would sell authentic personalized jerseys, all with the number 10 and the fan’s name on the back. Obviously, no player would be allowed to wear 10.

    Players change teams all the time, but the fans stay loyal to the team. They should be able to have a jersey that will never go out of style (considering the expense of an authentic jersey), and their name should be as important as the players’ names.

  • gak | February 15, 2007 at 11:36 pm |

    NY Times has an article about Scott Schoeneweis’ holding a Mets jersey with a number other than 60, which then changes back to 60 as it covers the history of his number over his entire career.

  • TonyE | February 15, 2007 at 11:57 pm |

    Didn’t Elgin Baylor retire just before the Lakers went on their 33-game winning streak?

    In fact he retired thee game before the Lakers went on to snap off 33 in a row… Nice catch. Maybe that’s the superstition, ask Elgin to retire and get ready for a 33-game streak…Clippers?

    Baylor finally retired nine games into the 1971-72 season because of his nagging knee problems. His retirement resulted in two great ironies. First, the Lakers’ next game after his retirement was the first of an NBA record of 33 consecutive wins. Second, the Lakers went on to win the NBA Championship that season, something that Baylor never achieved. He finished his career with 23,149 points, 3,650 assists and 11,463 rebounds over 846 games.

  • Buckeye Mike | February 16, 2007 at 12:23 am |

    one more bad luck, not overly uni related but in Nascar and any raceing for that matter, green is a bad luck color. A lot of drivers will not drive or wear green to save their lives. But when Bobby Labonte (sp?) won the title in 2000, i guess that proves it wrong.

  • Kel | February 16, 2007 at 9:10 am |

    [quote comment="55401"][quote comment="55396"]Nothing is more lame though than wearing an authentic jersey that you had personalized with your name. I mean, do you think you might be mistaken for a former player with your 42 inch chest and 48 inch waist? Or maybe they might ask you to pinch hit for one of the Mets that tears a calf muscle?[/quote]

    This is the first I’m seeing of this comment, and it is just terrible. Most guys I know grew up dreaming of being a major league player. Getting a game jersey with your name on it is just a little part of that dream…if I can’t play where they play, at least I can wear what they wear sort of thing. Would you prefer fans only have cheap replicas with their own name?

    So I am standing up and saying that if you think that there is nothing more lame than wearing an authentic jersey that you had personalized with your name, then I am now CAPTAIN LAME! I have about 10 of them, and I will defend my fellow lame-o’s.[/quote]

    I agree, Joe. My son’s hero is Eddie Pope, who plays for RSL. I bought him a jersey for his birthday and am working on finding where I can get the jersey personalized with my son’s last name and number.

    Lame? I don’t think so. More of an adoring fan with respect and love for the game, and a hope to one day play as a pro.

  • Mark in Shiga | February 16, 2007 at 9:11 am |

    [quote comment="55389"]First view of the new BP jersey at O’s spring training…hate the white sides![/quote]

    Why do the Orioles’ BP jerseys, which don’t have names on them, have the numbers shifted so far down? It’s like the makers of the jersey leave space for a name even if the shirt doesn’t actually have one. (See the Dock Ellis #17 photo at the top of the page for a jersey with correct positioning.)

    [quote comment="55559"]If I ever owned a baseball team, I would sell authentic personalized jerseys, all with the number 10 and the fan’s name on the back. Obviously, no player would be allowed to wear 10.[/quote]

    The Rakuten Golden Eagles in Japan do this — the fan is the “10th player” and the number 10 is a retired number. You’d think that with the Pacific League using the DH, the fan would be the [b]eleventh[/b] man, but…

    And many soccer teams do this with #12. Personally I think it’s silly; players who might want the number can’t have it! Let the fans wear their favorite players’ numbers instead of “assigning” them all the same number.

  • Joey Guns | February 16, 2007 at 10:29 am |

    My friend always buy his jerseys (NY Mets or NY Rangers) with no names on the back, so he never has to worry about his favorite player getting traded.

    I don’t think it’s a big deal to wear a former player’s jersey at a game. In August 2006, I wore my Mike Piazza Mets jersey to the Mets-Padres game that was his first game back at Shea. It’s funny when you see people with Gregg Jeffries, Lenny Dykstra, Bob Ojeda, Ron Darling, Nolan Ryan, Tom Seaver, etc retro Mets jerseys.

  • Andy from OKC | February 16, 2007 at 2:15 pm |

    [quote comment="55524"]
    76ers’ red unis = good.

    Hornets’ red unis = good … GOD![/quote]

    Note to Andy fom KC — the Hornets’ one-time jerseys may not look the best…but they were on display in Oklahoma City before 17000 wild fans. How many NBA games you boys in KC seen lately?

  • Doug B | February 20, 2007 at 3:41 pm |

    The Broncos are superstitious about alternate uniforms. They introduced an alternate orange jersey in 2002. It was game worn for one game in ’02 vs. the Colts. The Colts kicked a 51 yard field goal (remember VanderJagt) to win that game. The orange alt was worn again in ’04 when the Broncos blew an 11 point lead with 4 minutes to go against an awful Raiders team. Although the orange alternate is a popular fan purchase, I doubt the Broncos will wear it again.

    They did wear the throwback orange on Thanksgiving ’01, however.