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Answer Key

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Okay, the entries have been graded, checked, and double-checked, the points have been tabulated, and the bribes have been accepted. With all that out of the way, here are the results of the Distant Replays $200 gift card quiz:

The top contestants were Jerry Wolper and Marc Malfara, both of whom correctly answered 23 of the 25 questions. Rounding out the top ten: Timothy Fesmire (22 correct answers), Jeff Scott (22), Derek Traini (22), Jack White (22), Adam Strohm (21), Ethan Rowley (21), David Ribar (21), and Dan Donello (21). These ten readers will all be in the final drawing.

There were 117 other entrants. To choose the wild card finalist, I listed these readers according to their scores. Then I went to Random.org and had the site select a random integer from 1 to 117. This turned out to be 34, which corresponded with Christopher Marcinko‘s spot on the list (he had 18 correct answers), so he gets our wild card berth. His name, along with the names of the top ten scorers, will go into my Green Bay Packers helmet for the final drawing, which I’ll conduct on Thursday. Then I’ll announce the winner on Friday.

Big thanks to all who entered, and bigger thanks to Uni Watch intern Vince Grzegorek, who sacrificed his own chance to enter the contest so he could handle the scoring and tabulation duties instead (how about that for devotion).

Answers to all the questions, along with scoring methodology and the percentage of correct responses to each question, are as follows:

1) Who was the last MLB player not to wear an earflap while batting?

Answer: My pre-calc teacher used to refer to a math problem’s “right wrong answer” — in other words, the somewhat predictable incorrect response. The right wrong answer to this question is Gary Gaetti, who appeared to be the last unflapped batter when he retired in April of 2000. But then Tim Raines came out of retirement and played in 2001 and 2002. He’s the right right answer. (Correct response rate: 69%)

2) In Jim Bouton’s seminal 1970 book, Ball Four, he refers to a player who would “smooth his uniform carefully, adjust his cap, tighten his belt, and say, ‘I can add 20 points to my average if I know I look ______ out there.’ ” Who was the player, and what’s the missing word in that sentence?

Answer: It was Dick Stuart who uttered the immortal line, “I can add 20 points to my average if I know I look bitchin’ out there.” You had to have his name and the missing word in order to get credit for this answer. (Correct responses: 53%)

3) The NHL required all teams to wear player names on the backs of jerseys in 1977. But Maple Leafs owner Harold Ballward, who was opposed to the new rule, found a creative way to get around it. What did he do?

Answer: He put white names on the white jerseys and blue names on the blue jerseys. This question had the highest rate of correct answers. (Correct responses: 87%)

4) Only two NFL players have worn the controversial ProCap anti-concussion attachment during regular-season games. Who were they?

Answer: Steve Wallace and Mark Kelso. (Correct responses: 65%)

5) Name the last NHL player not to wear a helmet and the last NHL goalie not to wear a mask.

Answer: Craig MacTavish and Andy Brown, respectively. You had to have both names to get credit for this one. (Correct responses: 72%)

6) Only two current MLB team captains wear a “C” on their jerseys. Who are they, and what was the last NFL team whose captains wore “C” designations?

Answer: I gave half-credit for the two MLB names, which are Jason Varitek and Mike Sweeney, and another half-credit for the NFL team, which is the Cowboys. (Correct responses: 53% for the first part, 35% for the second, and 23% for both.)

7) Who was the last MLB catcher to wear a conventional mask with a backwards cap (i.e., no helmet, no goalie-style mask)?

Answer: Rick Dempsey, who retired in 1992. This is one of the two questions that Jerry Wolper got wrong. (Correct responses: 17%)

8) Durene was the go-to fabric for football, basketball, and hockey jerseys in the ’40s, ’50s and ’60s. What two fibers make up durene?

Answer: This turned out to be a poorly worded question, because there’s more than one way to make durene. Everyone got credit for this one.

9) Back in the 1920s, Notre Dame’s dominating backfield became known as the Four Horsemen. One of these four players later played a key role in the development of NFL uniforms. Which one of the Four Horsemen was it, and what was his impact on NFL uniform history?

Answer: Elmer Layden later became NFL commissioner. During his tenure, he instituted the rule requiring NFL players to wear high socks. (Correct responses: 52%)

10) Eyeglasses have been fairly common over the years in MLB and the NBA, but not in the worlds of hockey or football. Name at least three NFL and/or NHL players (including at least one from each of the two leagues) who’ve worn glasses — not goggles, mind you, but glasses.

Answer: Another bad question, because the distinction between glasses and goggles isn’t always so clear. Everyone got credit for this one, too.

11) The Milwaukee Brewers came into existence in 1970 wearing blue and gold. This is because:

    a) Blue for Lake Michigan, gold for lager beer.

    b) Blue for Pabst Blue Ribbon and gold for Miller High Life, which were the city’s preeminent breweries at the time.

    c) Blue and gold were the colors of the old minor league Milwaukee Brewers, who played from 1902 through 1952.

    d) The franchise had previously been the Seattle Pilots, whose colors were also blue and gold, and the team’s new Milwaukee owners recycled the old Seattle uniforms because they were too cheap to spring for new ones.

    e) The franchise had previously been the Seattle Pilots, whose colors were also blue and gold, and there wasn’t time to order new uniforms because it wasn’t clear whether the team would be playing in Seattle or Milwaukee until after the end of spring training.

    f) The franchise had previously been the Seattle Pilots, whose colors were also blue and gold, and Topps asked the team not to change its colors because it would cause problems with that season’s edition of baseball cards.

    g) Trick question — none of the above.

Answer: The answer is e. (Correct responses: 77%)

12) True or False: It is against the rules for an NFL player’s hair to obscure his nameplate, but this regulation is never enforced.

Answer: False. (Correct responses: 72%)

13) The little hand-warmer muff worn by many NFL quarterbacks is sometimes referred to by a slang term. What is this term, and what is its derivation?

Answer: This turned out to be the toughest question in the quiz. Only one reader — Dave Frolick — knew that the hand-warmer is sometimes called a Pupello Pouch, after former Buccaneers equipment manager Frank Pupello, who’s widely credited with introducing the hand-warmer to the NFL. In fact, Frolick called it the Pupello Pocket, which isn’t quite correct, but I decided to give him credit for it anyway, especially since I couldn’t bear the thought of my entire readership being unable to answer one of the questions. (Correct responses: less than 1%)

14) Who is the only major-level athlete to have worn his birthday on his jersey?

Answer: Carlos May, who was born on May 17th and wore uniform No. 17, so his nameplate and uni number combined to read “May 17.” (Correct responses: 57%)

15) One of the following facemask designs was worn only in practice, not in an actual NFL game. Which one?

Answer: All of these facemasks were worn in NFL games, so the correct answer is f. Oh, and for the several of you who were certain that this one could never have seen game action because it didn’t provide enough visibility, look here. (Correct responses: 44%)

16) In the 1940s, NFL officials’ stripes were color-coded by position — black and white for the referee, red and white for the head linesman, orange and white for the umpire, green and white for the field judge, and so on. This statement is:

    a) True

    b) False

    c) A trick question — NFL officials didn’t wear stripes until the 1950s.

    d) A trick question — the NFL used two-man officiating crews until the 1950s.

Answer: Incredibly enough, this is true — another Elmer Layden innovation, incidentally. (Correct responses: 63%)

17) When the Expos switched from wool uniforms to polyester double-knits in the 1970s, Mike Jorgensen suffered an allergic reaction to the new polyester fabric, and a special non-poly uniform had to be made for him. This statement is:

    a) True

    b) False

    c) A trick question — Jorgensen actually had an allergy to wool and had to wear a polyester uniform while the rest of the team wore woolens.

    d) A trick question — the player in question was actually Ken Singleton.

    e) A double-trick question — the player in question was actually Ken Singleton, and he was allergic to wool, not poly.

Answer: By the time Ken Singleton joined the Expos in 1972, most other MLB teams had already switched to double-knits. But the ‘Spos were among the last two teams to make the switch — they were still wearing wool, and Singleton developed an allergic reaction to it, so a special polyester uniform had to be made for him. The correct answer is e. (Correct responses: 72%)

18) NFL players aren’t allowed to wear dark-tinted visors unless a doctor certifies that it’s medically necessary. This is because:

    a) You can’t market players as personalities if you can’t even see their faces.

    b) If a player is knocked out cold, the medical staff needs to see his eyes without having to remove the helmet from his head.

    c) The league is concerned that dark visors look gang-related.

    d) Trick question — anyone can wear a dark-tinted visor, but most players prefer a clear visor, because it doesn’t cut down on their vision.

Answer: The answer is b. (Correct responses: 74%)

19) Ricky Williams wore No. 34 for most of his senior year at Texas. But for one game he wore No. 37. Why?

Answer: It was a memorial tribute to Doak Walker. (Correct responses: 84%)

20) The last time MLB managers wore street clothes was in 1950. One of the two skippers wearing civvies that season was, of course, Connie Mack. Who was the other one?

Answer: Burt Shotton. (Correct responses: 68%)

21) Juan Pierre is the only current MLB player to wear his cap under his batting helmet. Who was the last player to do so before Pierre?

Answer: The right wrong answer, which several people gave, is Eddie Murray. But the right right answer is Kurt Abbott. This is one of the two questions that Marc Malfara missed. (Correct responses: 28%)

22) Which one of the following MLB players did not wear a facemask attached to his batting helmet at any point in his big league career?

    a) Charlie Hayes

    b) Ellis Valentine

    c) Warren Cromartie

    d) Dave Parker

    e) Kevin Seitzer

    f) Gary Roenicke

    g) Trick question — they all wore facemasks.

Answer: All of these players wore masks in MLB games except for Warren Cromartie (who may have worn a mask during his stint in Japan, but definitely not during his MLB career), so the answer is c. (Correct responses: 37%)

23) One of the Original Six NHL teams has never used a lace-up jersey collar. Which one?

Answer: The Red Wings. (Correct responses: 66%)

24) Every volleyball team has two players whose uniforms are different from their teammates’. Who are these two players, and what is distinctive about their uniforms?

Answer: This question confused a lot of people, many of whom mistakenly thought I was implying that there were two liberos. What I wanted was this: The libero wears a different-colored jersey, and the captain’s uniform number is underlined. (Correct responses: 9%)

25) The NBA is the only major-level sports league whose uniforms don’t carry a sportswear manufacturer’s logo. This is because:

    a) The sportswear companies have never been willing to meet the NBA’s asking price for uni-borne logo placement.

    b) The league and the players’ union have been unable to agree on how to split the licensing revenue, so the union has blocked a deal between the league and the sportswear companies.

    c) The NBA’s TV partners have insisted on a cut from the licensing revenue, and the league has balked at that demand.

    d) NBA commissioner David Stern strongly believes in the integrity of the league’s team brands, and doesn’t want to clutter up the uniforms with non-NBA logos.

Answer: Let’s hear it for David Stern — the answer is d. (Correct responses: 61%)

————–

So there you have it. Please keep any comments related to the quiz itself. Today’s non-quiz commentary should be posted on the “Flock Market” entry, directly above this one.

 

55 comments to Answer Key

  • nymets1787 | December 6, 2006 at 8:49 am |

    Wow, tough questions.

  • NickNH | December 6, 2006 at 9:06 am |

    I’m just proud that I got the Rick Dempsey question right without looking it up. Not bad for a 25-year-old guy.

    Thanks for the quiz, Paul, it was a pleasant diversion from a normal workday.

  • Jeremy | December 6, 2006 at 9:16 am |

    I got 20 correct! So close. That was tons of fun.

  • TyShula | December 6, 2006 at 9:30 am |

    i think i got 18.5

    lots of fun. thanks!

  • mg12 | December 6, 2006 at 9:32 am |

    I missed Mike Sweeney with the captain’s desgination.

    http://mlb.mlb.com/i...

    I also found an image of the New York Mets John Franco with a Captain’s patch as well. Scroll 3/4 of the way down

    http://www.ganglandn...

    Just curious, when did the Mets eliminate this practice?

  • Paul Lukas | December 6, 2006 at 9:36 am |

    [quote comment=”27129″]I also found an image of the New York Mets John Franco with a Captain’s patch as well. Scroll 3/4 of the way down

    http://www.ganglandn...

    Just curious, when did the Mets eliminate this practice?[/quote]

    The Mets don’t currently have a captain. Prior to Franco, Keith Hernandez and Gary Carter were co-captains. Hernandez wore the “C,” but Carter did not.

  • mg12 | December 6, 2006 at 9:43 am |

    My bad. I thought he still played for the Mets. I had to look at his career stats to see what he is up to. So he played in Houston in 2005, then did he retire? I thought that guy was going to play forever, something to do with the last name. I didn’t think that Julio or John would ever step down.

    Thanks for the quiz Paul, great questions.

  • Ian K | December 6, 2006 at 9:48 am |

    [quote comment=”27122″]I’m just proud that I got the Rick Dempsey question right without looking it up. Not bad for a 25-year-old guy.

    Thanks for the quiz, Paul, it was a pleasant diversion from a normal workday.[/quote]

    20.5 correct! So close! And I missed the Rick Dempsey question. My answer: Jim Sundberg. And for the record, my made-up answer for the handwarmer was “The Montana Muffler”.

  • TyShula | December 6, 2006 at 9:58 am |

    my made up name for the handwarmer was “The Nubbin’ Oven”

    that deserves extra credit right there!

  • RAS | December 6, 2006 at 10:07 am |

    This question:

    12) True or False: It is against the rules for an NFL player’s hair to obscure his nameplate, but this regulation is never enforced.

    is compound. Is it false that there is such a rule or is it false that this rule is never enforced?

  • Tim | December 6, 2006 at 10:13 am |

    Im in! Woo! I seriously thought that the muff was going to have a derogatory name, though. Some part of the female anatomy.

  • AMS | December 6, 2006 at 10:13 am |

    As for #12, I don’t think it’s a rule.

    Also, one source I read indicated that Carlos May
    s brother did the same thing with his birthday and number, though I only found that item in one place…did anyone else come across it?

  • Paul Lukas | December 6, 2006 at 10:20 am |

    [quote comment=”27143″]This question:

    12) True or False: It is against the rules for an NFL player’s hair to obscure his nameplate, but this regulation is never enforced.

    is compound. Is it false that there is such a rule or is it false that this rule is never enforced?[/quote]

    There’s no such rule.

  • Matt | December 6, 2006 at 10:29 am |

    On #14 would Sidney Crosby qualify–wears #87, born on 8-7-87?

  • andrew | December 6, 2006 at 10:33 am |

    while filling out my entry for the quiz (which never was sent into due to my computer crashing while I was trying to find the answer to #25– no bs…) I was pretty sure that I read or saw that Gregg Zaun was the last to just wear a cap and mask when catching, making #7 wrong. I could easily be wrong, however, since I have no pictoral evidence.

  • GoTerriers | December 6, 2006 at 10:34 am |

    [quote comment=”27153″][quote comment=”27143″]This question:

    12) True or False: It is against the rules for an NFL player’s hair to obscure his nameplate, but this regulation is never enforced.

    is compound. Is it false that there is such a rule or is it false that this rule is never enforced?[/quote]

    There’s no such rule.[/quote]

    But with the mass proliferation of guys’ hair hanging down (I’m not picking on your binky, Minna), and NFL players’ propensity for trying to do something to stand out in a league where conformity is mandated, is there any doubt that a change has been scribbled onto the legal pad of SOMEONE on the Rules Committee?

  • Dan D. | December 6, 2006 at 10:36 am |

    Wow, I didn’t think I would make the cut. Paul, thanks for putting together the quiz. It was a lot of fun.

  • Monkeysandwich | December 6, 2006 at 10:47 am |

    Scored 20/25
    Comments:
    –I, too, believed the lie that Jim Sundberg was the last to wear the soft cap in 1987. (FYI: Soft Cap banned 11.23.87)
    –How in the name of John Wilkes Booth was “The Gladiator” ever allowed into NFL competition?
    –We called the muff the “Penis Pocket” (coaches did too). Maybe a little toooooo slang.
    Thanks Paul for a magnificent diversion during a weekend board meeting.

  • The Gov'Nah | December 6, 2006 at 11:22 am |

    I was unable to enter. but the one question i knew was Rick Dempsey. i am so surprised so few got that right.

  • John from KY | December 6, 2006 at 11:22 am |

    [quote comment=”27169″]Scored 20/25
    Comments:
    –How in the name of John Wilkes Booth was “The Gladiator” ever allowed into NFL competition?[/quote]

    Without trying to find the citation on this on Helmet Hut, I believe the Rams equipment manager threw that together because the player (Jackie Slater maybe?) had been poked in the eye and would have risked further injury without extra protection that season. Of course, this was long before they came up with the current plastic visors.

  • John from KY | December 6, 2006 at 11:25 am |

    Oops – also, those Dungard facemasks were increadibly lightweight – I remember picking one up in a sporting goods store back in the 70s and the larger 2-bar that wrapped to the top of the helmet (like Jim Zorn and Steve Largent wore) were about half the weight of the regular Schutt OPO of the day. That contraption of two masks probably weighed as much as a regular Schutt lineman’s cage.

  • Steven | December 6, 2006 at 11:35 am |

    Wow. 20.5/25. Just missed out and I made a terrible mistake that would have given me 21.5. After working that hard to complete it I can’t believe I fucked it up…

  • Lou | December 6, 2006 at 11:52 am |

    Damn, 19.5. And I meant to put Kurt Abbott but I confused him with Walt Weiss. Also misread the NFL helmet visor choices. Should have had a 21.5. And I knew the deal with the Brewers and Pilots, but I still maintain that they could have picked different colors, Bud Selig was just too cheap to pay for new uniforms!

    I knew Tim Raines, Rick Dempsey and the Volleyball Uni answers!

  • Paul Lukas | December 6, 2006 at 11:53 am |

    [quote comment=”27159″]while filling out my entry for the quiz (which never was sent into due to my computer crashing while I was trying to find the answer to #25– no bs…) I was pretty sure that I read or saw that Gregg Zaun was the last to just wear a cap and mask when catching, making #7 wrong.[/quote]

    Not possible. Rulebook section 1.16(d), which states, “All catchers shall wear a catcher’s protective helmet, while fielding their position,” was enacted in 1987 (active catchers like Rick Dempsey were grandfathered), while Zaun didn’t make his MLB debut until 1995.

  • Jay B Palmer | December 6, 2006 at 12:18 pm |

    Paul, this was mean and sadistic.

    Can we do it again please?

  • Josh | December 6, 2006 at 12:28 pm |

    I am proud of myself. I got 20 right.
    I just missed the cut.

    If only I got Kurt Abbott right…I put Mark Lemke. Damn.

  • Matthew Peters | December 6, 2006 at 12:35 pm |

    So, can we dispute a “correct” answer? I answered false to #16, re the color-coded 1940’s NFL officials’ uniforms. The quote from the book “Last Team Standing” indicated that the umpires wore red/white and the linesmen wore orange/white. The question mixed those two colors up. As this site is dedicated to nit-picky details, I feel comfortable calling “foul”. My score is “officially” 20.5, I claim 21.5.

  • Matthew Peters | December 6, 2006 at 12:48 pm |

    [quote comment=”27201″]Paul, this was mean and sadistic.

    Can we do it again please?[/quote]

    Re my previous post: I didn’t want to come across as po’d. I did have a great time

    [quote comment=”27207″]So, can we dispute a “correct” answer? I answered false to #16, re the color-coded 1940’s NFL officials’ uniforms. The quote from the book “Last Team Standing” indicated that the umpires wore red/white and the linesmen wore orange/white. The question mixed those two colors up. As this site is dedicated to nit-picky details, I feel comfortable calling “foul”. My score is “officially” 20.5, I claim 21.5.[/quote]

  • BDH | December 6, 2006 at 1:21 pm |

    Hockey fan here wondering if we can get some names of NHL players that wore glasses (not goggles)?

  • GoTerriers | December 6, 2006 at 1:30 pm |

    [quote comment=”27221″]Hockey fan here wondering if we can get some names of NHL players that wore glasses (not goggles)?[/quote]

    Two answers I came up with were Al Arbour and Roy Mosgrove (sorry, no visual evidence . . excuse the pun).

  • Ian K | December 6, 2006 at 1:36 pm |

    The names I came up with were Al Arbour and Clint Albright.

    I included the photos I found in my quiz entry to justify the answers. I’m not a big hockey fan and had never heard of either player, so I wanted to validate it.

  • Mark | December 6, 2006 at 1:46 pm |

    I have the exact same comment/dispute/question as Matthew Peters regarding question 16, regarding the color of the umpire and linesman’s stripes being switched around. I don’t mean to come off as disgruntled, but it seems like it’s worth mentioning for a, shall we say, detail-oriented site such as this.

    Like Matthew, my score would have been at 21.5 if what was in “Last Team Standing” is to be believed. Also like Matthew, I had a great time researching the answers and thought the quiz was fantastic. I’m not going to lie, I only knew two right off the bat so there was a lot of googling involved and even consulting some actual books at the local library over the weekend.

    Paul, are the Uni-watch magnets available yet? There’s a prime spot on my fridge waiting for one.

  • Paul Lukas | December 6, 2006 at 1:46 pm |

    [quote comment=”27207″]So, can we dispute a “correct” answer? I answered false to #16, re the color-coded 1940’s NFL officials’ uniforms. The quote from the book “Last Team Standing” indicated that the umpires wore red/white and the linesmen wore orange/white. The question mixed those two colors up. As this site is dedicated to nit-picky details, I feel comfortable calling “foul”. My score is “officially” 20.5, I claim 21.5.[/quote]

    I’ve now written to Matthew directly to resolve this. If anyone else has issues with their score, please write to me directly. Thanks.

  • Paul Lukas | December 6, 2006 at 1:47 pm |

    [quote comment=”27229″]Paul, are the Uni-watch magnets available yet?[/quote]

    Yes.

  • Cork | December 6, 2006 at 1:57 pm |

    Did i learn nothing in grade school!?!!??

    20.5 and i messed up the Ken Singleton question (17) because i never read the final answer (e)

    I will now proceed to bang my head on my desk

  • Matthew P | December 6, 2006 at 2:07 pm |

    I got Russ Blinco as a glasses-wearing NHLer

  • Ray | December 6, 2006 at 2:28 pm |

    This explains why Google was so slow over the weekend

  • Mark in Shiga | December 6, 2006 at 2:45 pm |

    I noticed one of you schmucks trying to get people on Yahoo Answers to help you!

    (Should’ve tried that myself, since I got less than half correct…)

  • tedkerwin | December 6, 2006 at 2:47 pm |

    Just curious, were all the answers in the Uniblog Archives if you looked closely enough? I was too busy to enter.

  • Ian K | December 6, 2006 at 3:02 pm |

    [quote comment=”27260″]Just curious, were all the answers in the Uniblog Archives if you looked closely enough? I was too busy to enter.[/quote]

    I found the Kurt Abbott answer on an old Uni Watch blog entry. I also found the Tim Raines answer there in a Uni Watch article on the Village Voice website. In my answer, I also included that Rafael Furcal wore a earflap-less helmet on 4/8/04 in honor of Hank Aaron (date of his 715th HR), but the umpire made him remove it and he finished the AB with a normal helmet.

    A lot of the other answers were found with some intense Googling. Lucky for me the quiz came out last Thursday during icy, snowy weather and the office was almost empty.

  • Jay B Palmer | December 6, 2006 at 3:44 pm |

    [quote comment=”27259″]I noticed one of you schmucks trying to get people on Yahoo Answers to help you!

    (Should’ve tried that myself, since I got less than half correct…)[/quote]

    Yup, that was me…didn’t help though. And why the name calling? Were you not hugged enough as a child? :)

  • Shane | December 6, 2006 at 4:05 pm |

    Why does the libero wear a different colored jersey, anyway?

  • Jay B Palmer | December 6, 2006 at 4:16 pm |

    [quote comment=”27289″]Why does the libero wear a different colored jersey, anyway?[/quote]

    The libero is a player specialized in defensive skills: the libero must wear a contrasting jersey color from his or her teammates and cannot block or attack the ball when it is entirely above net height. When the ball is not in play, the libero can replace any back-row player, without prior notice to the officials. This replacement does not count against the substitution limit each team is allowed per set, although the libero may be replaced only by the player whom they replaced.

  • smcs | December 6, 2006 at 4:17 pm |

    The Libero is a defensive player and is not allowed to volley the ball over the net, and I am also pretty sure they are not allowed to set up a spike. It is just to distinguish the players, like a goalie in soccer.

  • Jerry Wolper | December 6, 2006 at 4:19 pm |

    Just curious, were all the answers in the Uniblog Archives if you looked closely enough? I was too busy to enter.

    No, although my incorrect Jim Sundberg answer was from a blog comment. Many answers could be found in old Uni Watch columns (Slate and Village Voice included), and a few were from elsewhere. I think Paul wrote up the Pupello Pouch, but it must be behind ESPN’s subscription wall; Google’s never heard of it.

    Congratulations to everybody, especially Marc.

  • Monkeysandwich | December 6, 2006 at 4:21 pm |

    Since the libero is only in the game as a defensive specialist and can only play the back row, it is to call attention to him/her so they cannot “accidentally” serve or rotate into the front row.

  • Monkeysandwich | December 6, 2006 at 4:26 pm |

    My “Glasses” answer was:
    –Bob Griese (Miami Dolphins)

    –Clint Albright (NY Rangers)

    –Al Arbour (Maple Leafs)

  • CU Tigers Fan | December 6, 2006 at 5:16 pm |

    [quote comment=”27230″][quote comment=”27207″]So, can we dispute a “correct” answer? I answered false to #16, re the color-coded 1940’s NFL officials’ uniforms. The quote from the book “Last Team Standing” indicated that the umpires wore red/white and the linesmen wore orange/white. The question mixed those two colors up. As this site is dedicated to nit-picky details, I feel comfortable calling “foul”. My score is “officially” 20.5, I claim 21.5.[/quote]

    I’ve now written to Matthew directly to resolve this. If anyone else has issues with their score, please write to me directly. Thanks.[/quote]

    I have issues with my score. But I blame only myself.

  • Marc M. | December 6, 2006 at 6:22 pm |

    [quote comment=”27297″]Just curious, were all the answers in the Uniblog Archives if you looked closely enough? I was too busy to enter.

    No, although my incorrect Jim Sundberg answer was from a blog comment. Many answers could be found in old Uni Watch columns (Slate and Village Voice included), and a few were from elsewhere. I think Paul wrote up the Pupello Pouch, but it must be behind ESPN’s subscription wall; Google’s never heard of it.

    Congratulations to everybody, especially Marc.[/quote]

    Thanks Jerry. Congrats to you too.

    My glasses guys were Al Arbor, Bob Greise and Chuck Muncie.

  • P Diddy | December 6, 2006 at 6:25 pm |

    [quote comment=”27226″]The names I came up with were Al Arbour and Clint Albright.

    I included the photos I found in my quiz entry to justify the answers. I’m not a big hockey fan and had never heard of either player, so I wanted to validate it.[/quote]

    Why is Al Arbour wearing jersey number 18, but the number on his glove is 62?

  • P Diddy | December 6, 2006 at 6:27 pm |

    [quote comment=”27222″][quote comment=”27221″]Hockey fan here wondering if we can get some names of NHL players that wore glasses (not goggles)?[/quote]

    Two answers I came up with were Al Arbour and Roy Mosgrove (sorry, no visual evidence . . excuse the pun).[/quote]

    sorry, wrong quote before. again, I ask the same question; why is Al Arbour wearing jersey number 18, but has 62 on his glove?

  • Mike | December 6, 2006 at 6:34 pm |

    I try to take a break from studying, and what does Paul do… put a big picture of a scantron card, from my school even at the top of his post. I get the message… back to the books

  • GoTerriers | December 6, 2006 at 8:51 pm |

    [quote comment=”27325″][quote comment=”27222″][quote comment=”27221″]Hockey fan here wondering if we can get some names of NHL players that wore glasses (not goggles)?[/quote]

    Two answers I came up with were Al Arbour and Roy Mosgrove (sorry, no visual evidence . . excuse the pun).[/quote]

    sorry, wrong quote before. again, I ask the same question; why is Al Arbour wearing jersey number 18, but has 62 on his glove?[/quote]

    To make it worse (or better?) it lookslike his other glove has the number 18 on it . . .

  • Larry | December 6, 2006 at 8:58 pm |

    Elmer Layden later became NFL commissioner. During his tenure, he ALSO instituted the rule requiring NFL players to wear helmets.

  • Minna H | December 7, 2006 at 12:19 am |

    [quote comment=”27160″][quote comment=”27153″][quote comment=”27143″]This question:

    12) True or False: It is against the rules for an NFL player’s hair to obscure his nameplate, but this regulation is never enforced.

    is compound. Is it false that there is such a rule or is it false that this rule is never enforced?[/quote]

    There’s no such rule.[/quote]

    But with the mass proliferation of guys’ hair hanging down (I’m not picking on your binky, Minna), and NFL players’ propensity for trying to do something to stand out in a league where conformity is mandated, is there any doubt that a change has been scribbled onto the legal pad of SOMEONE on the Rules Committee?[/quote]

    Man, did I suck at this quiz. Good thing I didn’t do this poorly in school. GoTerriers, he’s my boo not my binky.

    I called the handwarmer thing a Kangaroo Pouch (because Roo manufactures the one Favre wears), so I should get half a point for that.