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Insert Obligatory Jiminy Cricket Reference Here

cricket.jpg

There are a few jillion sports out there that I know exactly zero about, each with its own uniform protocols and history. So from time to time I want to let a knowledgeable reader fill us in on one of these lesser-known games — think of it as the Uni Watch Underappreciated Sports Program (even though, let’s face it, most of them are probably underappreciated for good reason). Kicking us off is Steve Jarvis, who has this to say on the subject of cricket:

Cricket is played over various formats. The first is test match cricket, or simply test cricket, which is played over five days and is traditionally played in “whites,” consisting of white trousers and a white shirt. Uniforms for test cricket have evolved slightly over the years, going from a standard dress clothes to performance apparel like this and this.

The first cricket world cup was played in 1975, and this is when a newer format, called one-day cricket, went mainstream at the highest level. During that world cup, uniforms were essentially the same as in test cricket. But throughout the late 1980s and 1990s, one-day cricket became a huge hit with fans due to its faster more exciting pace. In an effort to give cricket a “cool” makeover, coloured clothing was introduced, and the traditional red ball was replaced with a white ball. (As an aside, here’s an article on how cricket balls are made.)

As the popularity of one-day cricket has increased, various spin-offs have been invented, the most recent of which is Twenty20 (pronounced “twenty-twenty”), a short, fast-paced game with a finish inside of three hours.

Twenty20 cricket was first introduced in England in 2003. Entrance music for players, fireworks, and other things are being used, which has resulted in record crowds attending matches and increased sponsorship and TV coverage — along with lots of logo creep, sponsorship all over clothing and bats, and lots of very bad uniforms.

Here’s a rundown of the worst offenders for uniform design, in no particular order:

1. Australia, 2005: Check out the KFC patch on the leg!

2. New Zealand, 2004/2005: This was a retro throwback effort for the first international Twenty20 match.

3. Surrey Lions, 2006: What’s with the one brown sleeve?

4. India, 2002: Speaks for itself.

5. New Zealand, 1999: What do you call that colour?

6. South Africa: That’s the Standard Bank logo — surely one of the the biggest sponsor logos ever.

Cricket helmet protection has come a long way, too. Before the mid-1980s, playere were helmet-free. By the late 1980s and early 1990s, helmets became more widely used but generally had no protection for the face. The modern-day helmet has facial protection, and stronger and lighter materials are being used, such as titanium.

Okay, this is Paul again. While the preceding is a good start, it also leaves a lot of ground uncovered. Like, what’s up with those leg pads? What about these cool gloves? And what, pray tell, is the story behind the officials’ hats? If anyone wants to do a follow-up, feel free to send it in.

Uni Watch News Ticker: Several readers have written in with news of a particularly insidious example of logo creep: When the players exchanged jerseys after the France/Portugal World Cup semifinal match two days ago, several French players turned the Portugal jerseys inside-out and then put them on — and guess which Oregon-based company had anticipated this moment by putting its logo on the inside of the Portuguese shirts? (Hint: not this one.) No photo yet, but several image sleuths are working on it. … Here‘s my latest vintage uniform catalog find. Lots of great stuff here, including the hosiery page (duh) and the brilliant Lady Champion line. But the real prize is the amazing “Design Your Own Football Jerseys” spread — here’s the left page, and here’s the right. Check out all those striping options! … Footnote to yesterday’s ESPN column about messages written on cap underbrims: I called the Royals to ask about this photo, which appears to show something taped to Ambiorix Burgos’s underbrim, and maybe something written under there too. A team spokeswoman confirmed that Burgos definitely has something taped there (i.e., it’s not the “MLB Authentic” holograph decal, as dozens of you were no doubt about to tell me). But after checking with Burgos, she declined to give any details because “that is personal to Burgos and he wants to keep it to himself.” Dang. … Anyone else find it disturbing that you could Photoshop this face onto this body (and vice-versa) and nobody would be able to tell? … SI.com’s Stewart Mandel just wrote an article outlining the 10 things he’d do if he were the commissioner of college football. Check out item No. 7 on his list (with thanks to Marc Beck). … Good article here about the possible biological basis for tracking team colors (with thanks to longtime Uni Watch pal Dean Chadwin). … Pedro Fund Tote Board: Our collection to help Pedro “Poor House” Martinez pay his pant-leg fine is off and running — okay, off and walking — with current revenues of $4. Only $33.74 to go! Don’t delay — PayPal a buck or two (using paul_lukas@earthlink.net as the payee) today! … And don’t put away your wallet just yet — looks like we may also have to take up a collection for David Ortiz.

 

53 comments to Insert Obligatory Jiminy Cricket Reference Here

  • Brandon T. | July 7, 2006 at 9:19 am |

    I knew I liked Stewart Mandel for some reason…

    Also, did you know Nike purchased the right for the Indian cricket uniforms for something like $135.6 million…
    http://en.wikipedia.....
    Read the corporate influence section. So…logo creep knows no geographical (or sport) boundaries. I wonder if I can get Nike to sponsor my business casual uniforms here at work.

    BT

  • Matt UK | July 7, 2006 at 9:23 am |

    Nice cricket bit there, including some of the comical clothing that has been worn in one day cricket. Now to answer your questions Paul
    1) The lag pads (or leg guards as they’re properly known) – in cricket the aim is to stop the ball hitting the wicket (the 3 sticks in the middle of the pitch) whilst also scoring runs. Furthermore, the bowler is allowed to try and hit the batsman, although the ball has to bounce first. The ball is obviously hard, and so the pads are worn to protect the legs obviously! If the ball hits the pad and it would have gone on to hit the wicket, then the batsman is out leg before wicket.
    2) Similarly, the gloves are also worn as protection. The main reason is that in cricket the ball has to bounce when it is delivered, and obviously as the pitches are natural surfaces the bounce is variable. So sometimes the ball bounces higher than you’d think, and if it wasn’t for the gloves you’d get lots of broken hands and fingers. Some gloves, including my own, have plastic on the bottom two fingers to provide extra protection.
    3) The officials hats are just standard white sun hats, I don’t think there’s a required hat they have to wear like MLB umps, it’s up to them. Most teams will have a baseball style cap with the club/team logo on (this hat is usually blue, green or maroon), and a white sun hat style hat for sunnier days when you need to keep the sun off your face and neck, as sometimes you are fielding for 3 or more hours without a break.

  • Brett Donohue | July 7, 2006 at 9:43 am |

    I love the KFC logos, not only on the uniforms, but on those stick things, whatever they are called.

  • Lee | July 7, 2006 at 9:43 am |

    For the France v Portugal match, nike didnt put their swoosh on the inside of the jersey. it is on both side because it is embroidered. Usually the club and/or nation’s crest will also be embroidered so it appears on both sides, but for the world cup, nike went with larger crests that are patches rather than embroidery; thus, it is only on 1 side. its that way on all of the nike soccer jerseys that I own.

  • Matt UK | July 7, 2006 at 9:50 am |

    [quote comment=”2178″]I love the KFC logos, not only on the uniforms, but on those stick things, whatever they are called.[/quote]
    The sticks are called stumps, and 3 stumps, along with the two bails that rest in grooves on top of them, make up a wicket

  • Matt | July 7, 2006 at 10:01 am |

    I always crack up thinking that a cricket match can last days and that a “short” match lasts 3 hours.

    I WISH I had that kind of free time to play.

    Looks like a real cool sport.

  • Blaine | July 7, 2006 at 10:11 am |

    A little off today’s topic, but uni-related, nonetheless–Gary Bennett’s batting helmet didn’t have the Cardinals logo when he came in to pinch run for Yadier Molina last night after Molina was hit in the head. I can’t find a photo…any help?

  • Mayer | July 7, 2006 at 10:19 am |

    [quote comment=”2179″]For the France v Portugal match, nike didnt put their swoosh on the inside of the jersey. it is on both side because it is embroidered.[/quote]
    You could tell that that was the case because the swoosh on the inside-out jersey was backwards.

  • Brett Donohue | July 7, 2006 at 10:46 am |

    [quote comment=”2182″]I always crack up thinking that a cricket match can last days and that a “short” match lasts 3 hours.

    I WISH I had that kind of free time to play.

    Looks like a real cool sport.[/quote]
    I always crack up that you can play a cricket match for days and still end in a tie

  • Lars | July 7, 2006 at 11:09 am |

    If Madel’s suggestion went through what would we have to talk about? The largest thread so far was about the University of Nike in Oregon’s new unis. Plus we all know UNO would be stuck with those hideous costumes for 10 years if his idea were law, and nobody wants that!

    I also have a uni column request for Paul. How about a feature on college football “pride stickers” on player helmets. How do they earn them? Is there a set number for an achievement or is it the coach’s decision on how many to give?

    Of course no one can top the Buckeyes in this catagory, but it would be interesting to see a rundown of who gives them, what they give, and how they are given. I have always been curious.

  • Austin Gray | July 7, 2006 at 11:12 am |

    I might be alone, but I love the idea of a sport that lets both teams wear white. There seems to be something classy about it. I resent the notion, however, that the New Zealand beige uniforms are ugly. If anyone is interested in knowing, the beige uniforms have been adopted by a New Zealand supporters group called the Beige Brigade. Official Beige Brigade merchandise can be found at BeigeBrigade. It will also give you some information on the background of the beige uniforms, and it somehow makes them seem not quite so ugly.

    Also, it might be interesting to know that on most of the authentic Nike player shirts, they aren’t wearing sewn-on badges at all. They opted instead to essentially screen on the image of badges for the player versions to make the shirt lighter (by what, a gram?) and to cut down on the always painful “nipple rub.” Fear not, though. On any versions you can buy, the badges are fully sewn on, and much better looking.

  • todd krevanchi (krvanch) | July 7, 2006 at 11:16 am |

    as far as cricket goes.
    what is the dress protocol for the cable knit sweaters/jumpers? are they the alternate jersey of the sport?
    i assume that the v-neck colors also discriminate teams or clubs.

    the india team’s uni,
    http://www.worldcric...

    reminds me of the old spurs warm up with this brush stroke logo
    http://cache.gettyim...

    at least it wasnt as obnoxious as this
    http://cache.gettyim...

  • JTH | July 7, 2006 at 11:35 am |

    [quote comment=”2191″]I also have a uni column request for Paul. How about a feature on college football “pride stickers” on player helmets. How do they earn them? Is there a set number for an achievement or is it the coach’s decision on how many to give?
    [/quote]
    I’m fairly certain that he’s already written that column. I have no idea how long ago it was, but I’m thinking it wasn’t all that long ago. Check the archives.

  • jonas | July 7, 2006 at 11:43 am |

    anyone else notice that on the left page of the uni catalog, the buyer is asked to multiply by ‘quality’ rather than ‘quantity,’ which i imagine was intended…

  • Paul Lukas | July 7, 2006 at 11:52 am |

    Regarding the request in comment #10: I wrote about college pride stickers last fall. Here‘s the link.

  • John Cropp | July 7, 2006 at 11:57 am |

    In addition to dressing strangely, it appears that cricketers congratulate each other strangely as well!

    (see photo accompaning the blog).

    Ouch!

  • Matt | July 7, 2006 at 12:03 pm |

    Nike has already taken over buisness casual day here in Memphis. Everyone wears their swoosh polo strait from here to the golf course. I’ve got logocreep from the cubicle next to mine. There is no escape.

  • Matt | July 7, 2006 at 12:18 pm |

    [quote comment=”2198″]In addition to dressing strangely, it appears that cricketers congratulate each other strangely as well!

    (see photo accompaning the blog).

    Ouch![/quote]
    “Cup Check!”

  • Sam | July 7, 2006 at 12:34 pm |

    Anyone else notice that Pedro is now on the 15-day DL? If Nike derails the Mets first legimate playoff chance in 6 years, they’ll have hell to pay!

  • Brandon T. | July 7, 2006 at 12:54 pm |

    [quote comment=”2199″]Nike has already taken over buisness casual day here in Memphis. Everyone wears their swoosh polo strait from here to the golf course. I’ve got logocreep from the cubicle next to mine. There is no escape.[/quote]

    Ha! Matt, that’s hilarious! I’m going to start a uniform brand called “Logo Creep”, so when people wear my uniforms/shirts/etc., and they see the logo creep logo, it will help bring awareness to the prevalent virus of this day and age.

    BT

  • John Cropp | July 7, 2006 at 1:06 pm |

    I think I’ll start an athletic apparel company called “SWOOSH!”

    The Nike logo will be my product placement!

    (“THREE STRIPES” and “WHATEVER THE HELL THAT REEBOK THING IS” are still available”

  • Mark | July 7, 2006 at 1:16 pm |

    Reebok calls their logo the “vector.”

  • Jack H. | July 7, 2006 at 1:23 pm |

    I like their (the cricket players’) sweaters.

  • Paul Lukas | July 7, 2006 at 1:23 pm |

    It is vitally important that the word “vector” NEVER be used to describe the Reebok logo, at least on this site. The swoosh is, y’know, a swoosh, so the term is appropriate. But “vector” is just a bogus newspeak branding term. By invoking it, you play into Reebok’s hands (and wallet).

    Here’s a good term for the Reebok logo: “the Reebok logo.”

  • Jared | July 7, 2006 at 1:27 pm |

    In regards to this photo http://static.flickr... Ambiorix is using a Nike glove and wearing Reebok cleats. Major faux pax!

  • Jared | July 7, 2006 at 1:28 pm |

    [quote comment=”2207″]It is vitally important that the word “vector” NEVER be used to describe the Reebok logo, at least on this site. The swoosh is, y’know, a swoosh, so the term is appropriate. But “vector” is just a bogus newspeak branding term. By invoking it, you play into Reebok’s hands (and wallet).

    Here’s a good term for the Reebok logo: “the Reebok logo.”[/quote]

    A good term to use for the Reebok Logo is “Shit” just like their product.

  • Christopher Gilchrist | July 7, 2006 at 1:42 pm |

    Talk about logo creep, Uga (Georgia mascot) even wears a Nike swoosh on his jersey!

    Uga

  • Mark in Shiga | July 7, 2006 at 1:44 pm |

    Is it just me or are corporate logos like the one for Standard Bank on the South African cricket uniforms much more palatable than those that contain actual letters and words?

    My brain can block out symbols like the Nike logo if it’s small enough, but letters and words (which are completely unrelated to the sport or team) in advertising, such as that KFC nonsense are thoroughly distracting and make me want to boycott those companies.

    Don’t even get me started on full-fledged imperative sentences like “FLY EMIRATES”!

  • Jim | July 7, 2006 at 1:45 pm |

    I like how Albany is next to Harvard in the Champion catalog.

  • Micah | July 7, 2006 at 2:09 pm |

    [quote comment=”2208″]In regards to this photo http://static.flickr... Ambiorix is using a Nike glove and wearing Reebok cleats. Major faux pax![/quote]

    Man, you beat me to it!! :)

  • Brandon T. | July 7, 2006 at 2:27 pm |

    [quote comment=”2207″]It is vitally important that the word “vector” NEVER be used to describe the Reebok logo, at least on this site. The swoosh is, y’know, a swoosh, so the term is appropriate. But “vector” is just a bogus newspeak branding term. By invoking it, you play into Reebok’s hands (and wallet).

    Here’s a good term for the Reebok logo: “the Reebok logo.”[/quote]

    Agreed.

    Perhaps from now on we could refer to Reebok, Adidas, and Nike as Larry, Moe, and Curly. I think Nike has dibs on Curly.

    BT

  • JTH | July 7, 2006 at 2:34 pm |

    [quote comment=”2207″]The swoosh is, y’know, a swoosh, so the term is appropriate.[/quote]
    The swirlie?

  • Mark F. | July 7, 2006 at 3:08 pm |

    [quote comment=”2212″]Is it just me or are corporate logos like the one for Standard Bank on the South African cricket uniforms much more palatable than those that contain actual letters and words?

    My brain can block out symbols like the Nike logo if it’s small enough, but letters and words (which are completely unrelated to the sport or team) in advertising, such as that KFC nonsense are thoroughly distracting and make me want to boycott those companies.

    Don’t even get me started on full-fledged imperative sentences like “FLY EMIRATES”![/quote]
    I agree completely. I find the Standard Bank logo far less offensive than others. Of course, am I being hypocritical by saying this and still cringing every time I see logo creep?

  • Matt | July 7, 2006 at 3:16 pm |

    Proboally been posted before

    Came across while at work today

    The adidas logo story
    http://www.adidas-gr...

  • StevenWyder | July 7, 2006 at 3:40 pm |

    Nice references to Craft Beer today. First Redhook and Rogue. Don’t forget Deschutes in the Oregon Craft Beer list.

  • Bryan S | July 7, 2006 at 6:32 pm |

    Oops on that last post… I hadn’t finished reading all the comments.

  • Frank | July 7, 2006 at 7:50 pm |

    Concerning the color of the New Zealand jerseys it is electirc blue. This color reared it bright head in the 80’s when neon wasa fashioonable color. It is now only seen in gentlemans clubs as it does look good under a strobe light. Or so I’ve heard

  • Ryan | July 8, 2006 at 1:41 am |

    [quote comment=”2212″]Is it just me or are corporate logos like the one for Standard Bank on the South African cricket uniforms much more palatable than those that contain actual letters and words?

    My brain can block out symbols like the Nike logo if it’s small enough, but letters and words (which are completely unrelated to the sport or team) in advertising, such as that KFC nonsense are thoroughly distracting and make me want to boycott those companies.

    Don’t even get me started on full-fledged imperative sentences like “FLY EMIRATES”![/quote]

    Of course stuff like this is most apparent on Soccer kits, but to me they just become part of the uniform and not even an advertisement. For instance many years went by with Man U having “Sharp” on the front of their shirts, but I never went and bought a TV. When it is always there its just there, like the English D on the Tigers uniform. That said give me more English D and less Vodaphone.

  • mark campbell | July 8, 2006 at 7:29 am |

    Cricket umpires can wear whatever headgear they wish but normally wear flapcaps, panamas or what are known as cricket panamas which is pitured in the article. The broad brimmed cricket panama is very practile for fielders and umpires as they spend up to 6 hours a day in the sun with no shade which is pretty dangerous!

  • PFGuay | July 8, 2006 at 8:27 pm |

    Sorry if this has been brought up already (and for being off topic). There has been wind of a new Raptors jersey with “less purple”. Anyone heard anything about this?

  • Joe | July 8, 2006 at 9:30 pm |

    Paul, you must be running out of things to talk about if you’re talking about cricket :D What’s next? Aussie Rules? Rugby? Netball?

  • Mark Gottlieb | July 9, 2006 at 12:31 pm |

    And what would be so wrong about talking about Aussie rules, rugby or netball?

  • nybatt | July 9, 2006 at 4:50 pm |

    just tuned in to the tiger/pilot, um mariner, game… why do some players insist on wearing their pajamas when throwbacks are the gloriously on display??

    takes away from the total package… by the way, those tiger unis would be complete with the orange striped stirrups worn at another time in their history…

    nice job by the mariners with the pilot unis!!

  • Jack H. | July 9, 2006 at 4:54 pm |

    At least virtually all the Pilots-err, Mariners-are wearing the awesome socks. So is Magglio Ordonez for the Tiges, who normally wears pajamas. I’m pleased.

  • Zach | July 9, 2006 at 5:08 pm |

    Mariners are also wearing Pilots batting helmets, which is a completely awesome touch I think. Don’t teams usually wear their regular batting helmets with throwbacks?

  • Greg | July 9, 2006 at 6:33 pm |

    I don’t think it’s been brought up yet, but did anyone notice that Italy’s shoulder Puma logos are in different spots? Other Puma teams have them in the same part of the shoulder. What gives?

  • Chip | July 9, 2006 at 8:23 pm |

    Greg, I think it could be like what someone mentioned earlier about Germany (I think it was either Paul or the guy that wrote the World Cup article for him), in that Italy is most likely the “flagship” team for Puma, so they might be trying something different with them than the other teams…I could be totally wrong, that was just my thought.

  • Lee | July 9, 2006 at 10:29 pm |

    Italy, although they are puma’s big name team, have completely different kits than all other puma teams. when italy switched from kappa from puma before the euro 2004s, italy at first used the puma template, http://images.sports... , but then changed. Italy’s jerseys are designed by Neil Barrett, former design directer for prada and senior men’s designer for gucci. his first work for italy was for the euro 2004 tourney, http://www.u-soccer.... , and he continues to give italy a different look from the other puma teams. italy’s home kits, the blue one, are based off the regular puma template, but have the added black “wings” around the arms. it still has the arch around the neck and down the sides of the black of the back as every other puma kit. Italy’s white kit is completely different, http://www.kitbag.co... .

    well thats my best paul lukas impression.

  • Tom O'Grady | July 9, 2006 at 11:42 pm |

    http://static.flickr...

    The 1971 Champion Sports Products catalog looks a lot like the Stall and Dean Catalog from this year. Champion was retro cool even then but didn’t know it.

    Kudos to Italy for winning the World Cup even in those reidiculous royal blue and gold lettered outfits…

    T.

  • Chris | July 10, 2006 at 7:59 am |

    I noticed while reading the history of the Adidas logo that they show the 3 stripes as one of their logos on the right hand side of the page. Wouldn’t this go against their claims that the stripes on there tennis shirts are not a logo and can be any size without violating the logo size rules during tennis tournaments?

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  • Pete | July 11, 2007 at 4:34 pm |

    Hi, I was pleasantly surprised to come across this site and a little surprised to see a cricket category, I was amused by the selection of dodgy uniforms here, but as the main article seems to have been written by an Aussie he missed a few things.

    THe Surrey strip has a brown sleeve ‘cos that is their traditional cap and helmet colour, god knows why but that’s Surrey for you.

    It was traditional for teams to be diferentiated by their caps and sweaters, and the county or national cap is very important (as it is in many other sports of english origin) in england appearences for the national team are known as “caps” so a player with 20 appearences will be said to have “20 caps”. In Cricket debutants are often presented with their cap on the field before the start of their first Test. In county cricket is is traditional for a player to have to earn his “county cap” by services to the club (typically a couple of solid seasons), some counties still make “uncapped” players wear a different cap – Yorkshire has a special cap with an un-opened white rose on it for youth and second team players, while “capped” members of the first team (which automatically includes any non-English “overseas” players) have the fully open white rose on their caps. Some of the details of cricket wear have been broken down by the advent of new materials which have replaced wool sweaters for many teams (I have only found one comapny that will produce trims other than a handful of standard ones for modern fleece sweaters). No international team has yet adopted this style of sweater for whites.

    If you think the Australian Twenty20 Greys are bad, you should see their domestic (State) teams one-day kits, they all bear the same sponsorships and since the deal is negotiated with Cricket Australia they encourage teams to make them as big as possible.

    Someone commented on the stump Branding and I must say it is a pain – when I have played in matches with stickers on the stumps the colour transfers to the ball, so you get marks on the ball, which will probably affect the aerodynamics of it (the science of the way a cricket ball moves through the air is massively complicated due to the seam and the wear on a ball)

    I’ll also comment on Logo-Creep in Cricket – the Iinternational Cricket Council has put official limits on the placement and dimension of branding on equipment and uniforms used in international cricket. Most manufacturers don’t adhere to these when they produce equipment so you see many international players with pieces of white tape attached to their equipment: Leg Guards can only show one logo, but patterned straps are permitted – all the major manufacturers have a pattern by which you can recognise the gear – Grey-Nicolls’ Checkered bands – different colours denote different models – are probably most recognisable, as can be seen on the gloves linked to above which I, as a gear-nerd, recognise to be the “Powerbow Test” model, worn here by England’s Alistair Cook. Bat-branding is one thing which has caused some controversy – while bat makers have been putting their names on bats for at least 70 years, which now includes some pretty good graphics, although some companies have gone over the top with it. (Beast) In addition, players are now allowed to put stickers from personal sponsors on the back of the bat.

    Traditionally Players have held their bats aloft to aknowledge applause from the crowd when passign certain milestone stores, sadly the marketing men have persuaded a number of players to start to hold their bats up in such a way that the sponsors’ logos are foremost in the news photos of the event, Sadly one of the worlds best players is first among them.

    I’ve just realised that I’ve jsut started a treatise which could go on for several pages, but I won’t write one unless someone particularly wants it.

  • Pete | July 11, 2007 at 5:08 pm |

    That was meant to be Milestone scores… that typo will confuse people.